Our Veterans and Soldiers

                     

          

"We often take for granted the very things that most deserve our gratitude" - Cynthia Ozick

 


 

        We are looking for photos of people and/or places from around Kinmundy & Alma.  Can you help?

Or maybe you have stories or memories from the "Good Old Days"?  What do YOU remember?

        The Kinmundy Historical Society would be honored to preserve your memories and stories.  We also have the

equipment to scan (or copy) your photos so that they may be enjoyed now as well as for generations yet to come!

        We would love to hear from you!  For more information, please contact: 

       

   Dolores (Ford) Mobley – Dolores@ford-mobley.com

                       208 Joan Dr.; Divernon, IL  62530; (217) 625-7527

            or

           

            Gladys (Corrie) See – gsee49@yahoo.com

                                         408 S. Washington St.; Kinmundy, IL 62854; (618) 547-7731

 

 

                                           Click to return to  Previous Page

 

 


 

Alma Illinois serviceman

(V-2) Alma WWII soldier.  Three stars hang in the window of his home, which meant the parents had three sons who were in the service during WWII.

 


 

Archie R. Albert

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 6, 1961 - “Army Pvt. Archie R. ALBERT, son of Mr. and Mrs. Loren O. Albert, Alma, recently arrived on Okinawa and is now a member of the 30th Artillery Brigade at Fort Buckner.  Albert, a personnel specialist in the brigade’s Headquarters Battery, entered the army last November and completed basic training at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo.  The 18 year old soldier attended Kinmundy High School.  Before entering the Army, he was employed by the C.A. Glore Lumber Co. at Alma.”

 


 

Leland Alderson

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 28, 1945 – “Here’s one from PFC Leland ALDERSON dated 1 June, Leige, Belgium.  He says: My time over here has passed very rapid, that I can be thankful for.  I have received the Kinmundy Express and I wished to let you know that it is arriving.  I made my entrance in this area just about 30 days after the excitement, and only about a week after the buzz bombs ceased.  This was the city that seemed to be the main objective in the ‘bulge’, it is also the city that Hitler stated he would blow off the map, he did attempt to do just that with some 2,000 buzz bombs.  The personnel of this hospital and the surrounding General Hospitals located in this vicinity, have certainly recovered splendidly from those buzz bombs and strafing attacks, which they were compelled to sweat out.  Today we were notified we were to move.  This will be this unit’s third time to move, it will be my first with them.  It is a tremendous task to prepare a General Hospital to move, and be moved in we might say less than 10 days.  Many of the patients that I have had the opportunity to talk with, well remember this section, in fact, so well that they can even point out the houses and hedge rows that they used as what little protection they might give them.  About 2 weeks ago I had the opportunity to visit Aachen, Cologne, and Ulich, Germany.  The poppy flowers were in bloom, but the beautiful fields of blossoms did not hide the battle scars.  The German 88's were still resting where they were suddenly left by the rapidly retreating Nazi, rusting in the weather, tanks were still along the roads, the bombed out bridges on the roads were gaping holes, what had been concrete reinforced steel pill boxes.  At one place we observed a bombed out underground factory.  All of this was in the rolling agricultural land of the Ruhr valley, with the oxen in the field driven by a Kraut, not yet out of uniform.  We visited Aachea first, then Duren, Cologne, and last Ulich.  My vocabulary is far limited to express on paper the complete destruction of the cities I saw.  The people of Germany in these areas will not be able to forget for a long time, but how about the areas that were more fortunate.  In Cologne we visited the Cathedral which took some 400 years to build, it is ruined on the inside from the vibration of high explosives in the surrounding area, but from the outside stands as erect as ever.  My equipment must be in order, so this will be all for now.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 11, 1945 – “Mr. and Mrs. C.R. ALDERSON left Tuesday for Chicago to spend a few days with their son, PFC Leland ALDERSON and wife.  PFC Leland is enjoying a 30 day furlough after serving in France the past 7 months.  After his furlough has expired, he will report for duty in Birmingham, Ala.”

 


 

James Alexander

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 11, 1957 – “Pvt. Dwight James ALEXANDER of Ft. Lewis, Washington arrived home Saturday evening to spend a few days furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.J. ALEXANDER, and other relatives and friends.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 20, 1958 – “Cpl. Jimmie ALEXANDER of Fort Lewis, Wash., arrived Sunday night to spend a few days furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.J. ALEXANDER and other relatives.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Apr. 2, 1959 – “Jim ALEXANDER received his discharge from the army at Fort Lewis, Wash., March 24, and arrived home Monday.

 


 

Xon Alexander - “The Kinmundy Express” – March 29, 1945  -“Here’s a nice letter from Tec 3 Xon L. ALEXANDER, who is somewhere in India, Province of Assam.  He says: Dumfounded, I suppose hearing from me.  But for the first time since starting the long trip over here, I have found some time to catch up on my writing.  While in the states I received your paper regularly and enjoyed it every line.  Many of the fellows here have read it and also enjoyed it.  Especially Zatso.  It is the only column of its kind I have run across in any paper.  So if for nothing else, you should be commended for your originality.  I also enjoyed the letters from men in service.  I read Rex GAMMON’s description of India, while I was still in training; never dreaming, was to wind up here.  If Rex is still here could you send me his address.  I will sure try to contact him.  I have never run across any of the boys from home, but I’m still looking for someone.  All for now and thanks very much for the paper.”

 


 

Lee Roy Allen

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 10, 1965 –“Lee Roy ALLEN and Lester LOGUE have been inducted into the U.S. Army and left Monday from Centralia for Fort Leonard Wood, Mo.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 25, 1965 –“Pvt. Vernon LeeRoy ALLEN is now stationed in Germany.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 26, 1966 – “PFC LeeRoy ALLEN arrived Wednesday from Germany, where he had been stationed for the past 8 months.  He will enjoy a 20 day leave here with his wife and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Allen and other relatives.  Upon completion of his leave, he will report to Ft. Eustic, Va., for his next assignment.”

 


 

Vernon L. Allen

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 8, 1966 – “Pfc Vernon L. ALLEN left the states Aug. 9th for Okinawa, where he is receiving training.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 12, 1967 – “SP/4 Vernon L. ALLEN, son of Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Allen of Salem, is now stationed near Siagon, Vietnam.”

 


 

      

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-60) Harvey Alphine

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 9, 1957 – “Army Privates Harvey D. ALLPHIN, 18, and Farrol E. ARMSTRONG, 17, of Kinmundy, recently began 6 months of active military training under the Reserve Forces Act program at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo.  They are receiving 8 weeks of basic combat training.  After completion of the 6 months tour of active duty, they will spend the remainder of their military service in a local Army Reserve of the National Guard unit.  ALLPHIN, son of Mrs. Inez Nelie HANKS, Kinmundy, is a former employee of the International Shoe Co. in Flora.  ARMSTRONG, a former student at Kinmundy-Alma High School is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth ARMSTRONG of Kinmundy.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Darrel E. Anderson

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 30, 1961 - “Darrel E. ANDERSON, 19, son of Mrs. Forrest P. Anderson, Kinmundy, recently was promoted to specialist 4 in Germany where he is a member of Headquarters Detachment, U.S. Army Ammunition Depot.  Specialist Anderson, a clerk in the detachment in Miesau, entered the Army in Oct. 1959 and received basic training at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo.  He arrived overseas in Aug. 1960.  He is a 1959 graduate of Kinmundy Public High School.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  George Herman Anna

 

"Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – July 18, 1918;

 Co. A  54 Inf.  Reg. No. 418, 377   A.E.F.

 Dear Folks,

            I think by now you may be wondering why I don’t write but all the rest of the people I write to are just as bad off as you in that respect for this is the first letter I have written since we landed over here.  I have started to write several times and really sent one letter at the port where we landed to you folks but it was returned as I had too much on the outside of the envelope.  I am wiser now, though so I think this will pass the censor all right.

            I have seen a large part of northern France and I am pleased in some ways with it and in other ways I am slightly disappointed.  It is a beautiful country and seems to be pretty rich soil but the fields are not much larger than our new orchard and many of them smaller.  The methods of farming seem very crude to me but the crops seem to grow good in spite of that.  I saw some of the finest rye here I believe I ever saw and the clover grows very nice but I sure miss the fields of corn.  I haven’t seen a stalk of corn since I have been here and only two hogs and they appeared to be the old hazel splitter variety; big, high-backed animals with hair on them like a curry brush.  There are some fine cattle.

            We have been in several different towns so far and each looks pretty much like the other.  You may write to me at the same company and regiment but add American E.F. via New York.  All the towns have the same narrow streets, the same plaster and brick houses, the same bunch of jabbering people.  I suppose though if we could get their opinion of our talk, it would be the same that I have of theirs.  I can’t talk to the people any yet except to ask for a few things such as milk, bread, butter, water, wine and cigarettes.  I can speak a few works and understand more than I can say but not enough to carry on an intelligent conversation with any of the people here.

            Well I must close for this time hoping to hear from you soon, and I will try to write more next time.

                 Yours as ever - George H. ANNA

 

 

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois – Feb. 27, 1919            

The following letter was received by Miss Clara SEE in answer to a letter of inquiry concerning her nephew, Herman ANNA, who has at various times been reported dead.  While this letter in itself does not throw much light on this question, a previous letter from a nurse in one of the hospitals in France told of his death and burial.  Relatives here have virtually giving up hope of ever seeing him again, and thus it seems that we shall be compelled to place another golden star on our service flag, a star changed from the blue by the transforming power of man’s greatest service to mankind, his life for his fellow man. 

           That Herman ANNA gave an excellent account of himself, is very apparent from the words of his Major in the following letter.  Truly, as he has said, his relatives and friends may be proud of him.

 

Mostroff, Luxemborg, Jan. 24, 1919

Miss Clara SEE – Kinmundy, Ill.

Dear Madam – Your letter of January 3rd, regarding your nephew, Herman ANNA, received and noted.  To the best of my knowledge, he was injured on Nov. 10th in the battle of Marchville and taken to the hospital in a serious condition.  I have been able to get but one report concerning him and that was that one of the members of his company had seen him in the hospital.  However this was very uncertain as it came to me from other parties.

           Whether dead or alive, you and his friends and relatives can well be proud of him, as he fought like a demon on the day he was injured.  He was attacked by three Germans who concentrated their fire on him.  He got two of them, but the third one got him.  The boys all say his fighting was wonderful.

           I trust by this time you will have received some good news concerning him.

 

Yours truly,

Albert H. Gravenhorst – Major 130th Infantry

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-125) Farrol Armstrong

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 25, 1957 – “Pvt. Farrol E. ARMSTRONG, son of Mr. and Mrs. William K. ARMSTRONG of Kinmundy recently began the second phase of 6 months of active duty under the Reserve Forces Act at Fort Leonard Wood.  The 17 year old soldier attended Kinmundy High School.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


(V-387) Donna Bernice (Arnold) Jacobson - WWII

(Daughter of Ora & Lora (Garrett) Arnold)

 


 

(V-383) Daniel A. Arnold

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Dec. 28, 1944

"Sgt. D.A. ARNOLD Wounded in Germany: Staff Sergeant Daniel A. ARNOLD, 32, of this city, wounded by a German mine while serving with his armored infantry division in Germany, is now recovering at the 159th General Hospital, in England. He has been awarded the Purple Heart. "We were expecting a counter attack", Sgt. ARNOLD, a mortar squad leader, related, "and I was placing my squad in position at an outpost. Only spasmodic artillery fire was coming over at the time. I stepped on a mine on an embankment near a road. I was stunned for a few moments, and when I came to I was lying in the road. I was wounded in the right ankle, in both thighs, and in both legs. First aid was administered immediately and I was later flown to England." His ward surgeon, First Lieutenant Marvin S. SIEGEL of Brooklyn, N.Y., said, "Sgt. ARNOLD is showing steady improvement, and will be able to return to duty within a few weeks." Sgt. ARNOLD’s mother, Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD, resides in this city. A sister, Second Lieutenant Grace M. ARNOLD, is a nurse in a general hospital in France. A brother, Seaman Third Class Frank G. ARNOLD, is with the Seabees in the South Pacific area."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 28, 1945 – “S. Sgt. Daniel ARNOLD, Wounded in Holland, Now Enjoying Furlough With Home Folks: S. Sgt. Daniel A. ARNOLD arrived here June 18th to spend a 30 day furlough with his mother, Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD and other relatives.  He entered the service June 18, 1941, but was not shipped overseas until June 6, 1944, landing in England.  From there he went to France, then to Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany and Holland.  On Nov. 1, 1944, near Venlo, Holland, he was wounded by a land mine, injuring both legs.  He was taken to the hospital at Leige, Belgium, then to Paris, France, and then to England.  He started back to the states of May 8th landing May 20th.  After reaching the states, he was assigned to the Fitzsimmon German Hospital, Denver, Colo., as a patient.  Needless to say that he is enjoying his furlough here with relatives and friends very much.  He has a brother, Frank, in the navy, who recently returned from overseas and is now stationed at Camp Wescott, Davisville, R.I.  He also has a sister, 1st Lt. Grace, an army nurse, who recently returned from oversea duty and is now a patient in the Fitzsimmon General Hospital, Denver, Colo.  D.A. reports her, as being much improved but not able to make a visit home for 2 or 3 months yet.  Sgt. D.A. was a member of the 7th Armored Division and wears the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Good Conduct Ribbon, the Pre-Pearl Harbor Ribbon, the Purple Heart and the European Theater of Operations Ribbon with 3 stars, representing the battles of France, German and Belgium-Holland.”

 

 

 


 

Donna Arnold

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 27, 1945 – “PFC Donna ARNOLD, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ora ARNOLD of the Arnold Chapel neighborhood, arrived home Dec. 4, after receiving her discharge at Ft. Sheridan the day previous.  Donna enlisted in the WAC April 7, 1944 and was sent to Palm Springs, Calif., for 16 months, after which she was stationed at Stockton Field, Calif.  She was assigned to the Training Aids Dept., as a draftsman.  PFC ARNOLD wears the Good Conduct Medal, the American Defense Ribbon, and the Victory Medal.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 3, 1946 –“A picture was printed of PFC Donna ARNOLD, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Orie ARNOLD, who arrived home Dec. 4 after receiving her discharge the day previous.  She was stationed in California.”

 


 

Frank Arnold

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 24, 1945 – “Frank ARNOLD, SSMB2 c, arrived Saturday for a leave with his mother, Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD and Miss Ruby.  Enroute he visited with his sister, Lt. Grace ARNOLD, in his mother, Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD and Miss Ruby.  Enroute he visited with his sister, Lt. Grace ARNOLD, in the Fitzsimmons Hospital in Denver, Colo.  Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD received word Sunday from her son, S. Sgt. D.A. ARNOLD, that he has arrived in the States from Europe.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 31, 1945 – “Frank ARNOLD, SSMB2c, arrived here on May 18th after spending the past year in the Marshall Islands.  Needless to say that he was mighty glad to get home and see his mother, Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD and family as well as his many friends.  Frank enlisted in the C.B.s on Nov. 24, 1942.  And after training at various stations, shipped overseas on May 6, 1944, landing in the Marshall Islands.  The island on which he was stationed consisted of nothing but rock, no vegetation, no flies, no mosquitoes, and the best all, no fighting.  They were just there guarding the island.  Consequently, life was pretty dull.  Frank developed a little trouble in one limb and was sent back to the states, landing on April 16th.  He was sent to the hospital at San Diego for a few days and then dismissed and given a 30 day leave.  Enroute here, he stopped in Denver, Colo., and visited a short time with his sister, Lt. Grace ARNOLD, who is a patient in the Fitzsimmons General Hospital there.  Frank will report back to duty in Detroit, Mich., on June 11, and then will be reassigned from there.  He has one brother, Sgt. Daniel A. ARNOLD, who is in the service and has just recently returned to the states from the Western Front where he was wounded.  Saturday the mother received word that he was now a patient in the Fitzsimmons General Hospital, Denver, Colo., the same hospital in which his sister, Lt. Grace, is a patient. Frank wears the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon.”

 

 


 

George D. Arnold

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 26, 1962 - “George D. ARNOLD, son of Mr. and Mrs. George W. Arnold, Kinmundy, recently was promoted to Private first class in Germany where he is a member of the 26th Artillery.  Arnold, assigned to the artillery’s Battery A, entered the Army in Oct. 1959, completed basic training at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo., and arrived overseas in April 1960.  The 20 year old soldier attended Kinmundy High School.”

 


 

 

(V-306) Grace Arnold

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 5, 1945  - “Lt. Grace ARNOLD Lands Back in States: Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD received word that her daughter, Lt. Grace ARNOLD, landed back in the States after serving overseas.  Naturally, they are expecting her home in the near future.  Lt. ARNOLD was among the first nurses to be sent to the Western Front.  She was returned to the states on account of ill health, and was in South Carolina when she notified her mother of her arrival.  We are all very anxious to see Lt. Grace home again.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 7, 1946 –“1st Lt. Grace ARNOLD, daughter of Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD, of this city, who was discharged Dec. 31st and is now a patient in the Dunham Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio.  Lt. ARNOLD entered the service as a nurse in Aug. 1942 and shipped overseas in Dec. 1943.  Her work was mostly in a Field Hospital in Belgium.  She was returned to the states in April 1945 and sent to the Fitzsimmons General Hospital, Denver, Colo., as a patient.  She is reported as being some improved in health but it will be some time yet before she is completely well again.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 20, 1946 –“Miss Grace ARNOLD, daughter of Mrs. Agnes ARNOLD, arrived home last week, and we are very happy to report, has regained her health to such an extent that she really looks hale and hearty, but realizes she must go slow for awhile.  Miss ARNOLD entered the service as a nurse and was given the commission of Lieutenant in Aug. 1942.  She went overseas in Dec. 1943 and served with a Field Hospital Unit in Belgium.  The untiring service she gave our wounded lads, and the exposure to the elements of the weather proved too much for her health.  She returned to the states in April 1945 and was sent to the Fitzsimmons General Hospital, Denver, Colo., as a patient.  Here she remained until she was discharged on Dec. 31st last.  After her discharge, she entered the Dunham Hospital, Cincinatti, Ohio as a patient.   She had trained in this hospital and had great faith in it and the doctors.  She remained there until her return home.  And it looks as though her faith was well founded.  We sincerely hope that Grace will soon be strong enough to soon carry on with her chosen profession.”

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 2, 1963 - “Airman Third Class Merle L. ARNOLD of Kinmundy is being reassigned to Schilling AFB, Kans for training and duty as an air policeman.  Airman Arnold recently completed U.S. Air Force basic military at Lackland AFB, Texas.  The airman, son of Mr. and Mrs. D.A. Arnold of Kinmundy, attended Kinmundy-Alma High School”  (A photo was included with this article.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-365) Merle L. Arnold

 


 

Stanley D. Arnold   and   Steven L. Arnold

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 14, 1967 – “Two Sons Wounded in Action” – Mr. and Mrs. Dean Arnold, formerly of the Arnold Chapel community received word that 2 of their sons were wounded in Vietnam, Capt. Stanley D. ARNOLD, a helicopter pilot, was shot down and wounded in the arm as a bullet came thru the windshield.  His gunner was killed.

            Capt. Steven L. ARNOLD received injuries of the face and eyes after a mortar shell was dropped in a group, killing one and injuring fifteen.  They are nephews of Mr. and Mrs. Dale Ballance of this city.”

 


 

R. Raymond Atkins

"The Kinmundy Express" - Sept. 14, 1944 - "First Lieutenant Richard R. ATKINS of this city has been awarded the Bronze Star for heroic achievement in action on the Fifty Army front in Italy. Presentation of the award was made by Major General William G. LIVESAY, commander of the 91st Infantry Division at a ceremony held near the front lines. While directing fire from an artillery battery during the drive to the Arno River, an enemy shell landed 10 yards from ATKINS and set ammunition afire. Ignoring the enemy shelling and the exploding ammunition behind him, ATKINS cooly continued to direct fire at the enemy. He also directed the extinguishing of the burning ammunition and administering of first aid to his men. The 35 year old officer entered the army June 23, 1942 and was commissioned at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, Jan. 14, 1943."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 2, 1945 – “Mrs. Elizabeth ATKINS received a telegram yesterday morning stating that her son, Capt. Raymond ATKINS, had landed safely back in the U.S.A. from Italy where he had been stationed.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 9, 1945 – “1st Lt. Raymond ATKINS arrived here Saturday night to spend a 30 day furlough with his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth ATKINS, after spending the past 16 months in sunny Italy.  Lt. ATKINS entered the service June 23, 1942, and was commissioned Jan. 14, 1943.  The following June, he was advanced to the rank of 1st Lieut.  He shipped overseas in March 1944, landing in Oran, Africa.  From there he went to Italy where he remained until Aug. 1, when he sailed for home.  He was a member of the 361st Combat Team, a part of the 91st Division.   He wears the Middle European and Eastern Theater Ribbon, with 3 stars, representing the battles of Rome-Arno, Northern Appenines and Po Valley.  After his leave has expired, he will report to Ft. Sills, Okla. for further instructions.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 13, 1945 – “Lt. Raymond ATKINS, son of Mrs. Elizabeth ATKINS, arrived home Dec. 11 after receiving his discharge at Fort Sills, Okla., on Dec. 9th.  Lt. ATKINS entered the service June 23, 1942, and was commissioned Jan. 14, 1943.   The following June, he was advanced to the rank of 1st Lieut.  He shipped overseas in March 1944, landing in Oran, Africa.  From there, he went to Italy where he was stationed until August 1st, when he sailed for home.  Upon his arrival in the states, he was granted a 30 day leave which was spent here with his mother.  After his leave expired, he reported for duty at Ft. Sills, Okla., where he was stationed until receiving his discharge.  Lt. ATKINS was a member of the 361st Combat Team, a part of the 91st Division.  He wears the Middle European and Eastern Theater Ribbon with 3 stars representing the Rome-Arno, Northern Apennines and Po Valley Campaigns, the American Theater Ribbon, and the Victory Ribbon.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 7, 1946 –“1st Lt. Raymond ATKINS, who is on terminal leave, received word a few days ago that he had been promoted to the rank of Captain.  His leave will expire in about a month, after which, he says he will be a civilian again.”

 


 

Lewis Atterbury - “The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 25, 1945 – “Shriver School: A family gathering was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Edd ATTERBURY.  Their son, Lewis, has recently returned from overseas.”

 


 

Edward Aumiller

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois - Jan. 16, 1919     

Private Edward AUMILLER of Co. E, 320th Inf. American E.F. writes the following letter from France:

 

Dear Friend: I will try once more to write you a few lines.  I am all ok.  Hope these few lines will and you the same.  I am in France yet still drilling quails right and left.  We are practicing for Parade Work over here and I expect in the U.S.A.  But I don’t know when it will be.  I don’t know where Ernest Black of Odin is.  I haven’t heard from him since our division was divided up.  I haven’t heard from any of the boys since then I would like to know where they are.  I was up at the lines once since I have been here.  I never got hurt at all it wasn’t as safe a time as I have seen and I never saw the worst of it.  Telf, the other girls I haven’t time to write to them.  Will write soon.  I haven’t been where I could write or I would have written before.  Don’t think I have forgotten you or didn’t want to write it was because I was where I couldn’t write.  I haven’t received any letters from anyone since October.  Sometimes I think my friends have lost me and don’t know where I am.  I must close with Best Wishes for a Merry Xmas and A Happy New Year.

Private AUMILLER was in training at Camp Taylor later Camp Sherman and then Camp Mills.  At this time he was a member of Co. I 335 Infantry 84th Division but has been transferred to the Co. given above.

 


 

Joseph Bargh

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 10, 1949 – “Recruit Joseph BARGH, son of Mrs. Mildred R. BARGH of Kinmundy, has completed a course of study for Army Clerks with the 47th Specialist Training Regiment of the 9th Infantry Division, Fort Dix, N.J”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 30, 1951 – “Sgt. Joe BARGH, son of Mrs. Mildred BARGH, arrived home Friday night after a year in Japan and Korea.  He is on furlough and will be discharged upon his return to camp.”

 


 

Gene Baker

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 3, 1949 – “Omega: Eugene BAKER enlisted in the army and left for Camp Breckinridge Monday.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 2, 1949 – “Omega: Mr. and Mrs. J.R. BAKER received word Saturday that their son, Eugene, who is in the army in Alabama, had been injured in an auto accident and was in the hospital in Chattanooga, Tenn.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 26, 1952 – “Omega: Gene BAKER, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.R. BAKER received his discharge from the army and is now at home.”

 


 

Bernie Bailey

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – July 18, 1918;

 Camp Mills, N.Y.;  June 30, 1918

   Dear Folks,

            I arrived here yesterday about 4 o’clock and it is sure a fine camp what I have seen of it.  We were 52 hours on the road from Camp Wadsworth.  We came through Philadelphia.  The Red Cross was there and gave us lunch, iced tea, and cigarettes.  The Red Cross sure treats us fine at all the stops we have made.  We were in Washington D.C. two hours, and were served to lunch by President Wilson’s wife.

            She also gave each soldier a checkerboard and dominoes.  We went from there to Baltimore, Md., and then to New York City where we took a boat to Brooklyn.  We were on the boat three hours and then took a Pennsylania train for camp which is 20 miles from New York.  This is a fine looking country.  We had a fine bed on the train Pullman sleeper; we were on there two nights.  I haven’t heard from anyone except Lewis ROBB and Walter MILLER.  Walter is at Camp Sherman in Ohio.  Our mail will be sent from Camp Wadworth to here.  We haven’t had any pay yet and haven’t drilled any for three weeks but won’t drill any here.  I think we will stay here about two weeks and then xxxxx.  Air ___ are making so much noise I can’t think of any thing to write.  I saw the largest building in the U.S.A. and Wall Street and other things.  How is everything and everybody?  I am fine and dandy.  There were 45,000 ___ this camp last week going across the water.  We were not allowed to tell anything about where we were going while we were on the train.  Good bye.    

          Bernie BAILEY

 

 

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois - Jan. 9, 1919  

 Nov. 28, 1918 

Dear Folks,

I will now try and write a few lines as today is Thanksgiving and a little bit chilly, but Private BAILEY is fine and dandy.  I have not received any mail for nearly two months.  I left my Co. the first of Nov. and went to the hospital.  I had that disease you call Spanish Influenza.  I was well by the time they got me to the hospital.  I was there about a week and have been all the rest of the time getting back to my Co. and I am not back yet and might not get back but I hope I will for I know I have lots of mail there.  I don’t know when we will get back to the States, but I hope we get there before long.  I was on the Verdun front when I left the Co.  I am close to Bordeaux, that is a large city in France.   I was in the hospital when the Armistice was signed; the boys liked to tore down that place.  We made the Huns say enough and I was one of the guys and I am still one of the guys.  I wish all the boys could say that but of course there never was a war but what there was some one killed.  We are waiting for them to say “Gang Plank Formation” which means All aboard for U.S.A. and when we see that Statue of Liberty in N.Y. we will be a happy bunch.  We sure have some frost here.  We slept on the ground for a few nights.  We would wake up in the moe frost all over our blankets and sometimes our heads would stick out and catch a little of it.  Don’t write to me any more for I won’t get your mail.

With Love,   Bernie BAILEY

 

 

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois – Feb. 6, 1919

“Somewhere in France”; Dec. 26

 

Dear Father and all,

Received a letter today dated October 17.  You was saying you had not been getting letters from me.  Of course I can’t write as often as you can but I write when I get an opportunity and of course that is not every day and you might say not every week, but I do my best and of course, you know that is good.

Christmas is over and I guess I was thought of by homefolks, but listen, don’t worry about Private BAILEY, for when I do get back we will sit down and have a good chat all about the war.  We were treated fine Christmas and had the best of eats, pie, cake roast pork, candy and everything and I am sure capable of doing justice to anything like that.  I got a letter from Bert and also Frank, the latter was wounded, but I guess Bert never got to the front.  I wish you all a Merry Xmas and a Happy New Year and when you think of me, think that I am in a palace of gold and protected by the best of artillery.  I believe I told you not to write when I was in the hospital but now I am with the Co., so keep on writing.

     Bernie BAILEY

 

 

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois – March 13, 1919         

France, Jan. 13, 1919

Dear Sister, Brother, Father and Mother,

           Just received a letter from you dated Nov. 29 so you see I was a long time in getting it although it was good when it did come.  Just think this is the first mail I have had in a month, but don’t worry about me for I am fine and dandy.

           I was called over to the Orderly room the other day and to my surprise there was a letter to the Company Commander from home, saying you were not receiving any mail from me.  I sure wrote so don’t put the blame on me.  We are billeted in a French town and drill 5 hours a day.  We have football games the rest of the day.  The weather at the present is very good only we have lots of rain.  Frank wrote and told me he wounded, but not so bad.  I don’t know when we will sail for the U.S.A. but I think before long.  When I do get there, we will have a big old time, so just wait patiently and I will land all O.K.

          Love to all,   Bernie BAILEY

 


 

Bert Bailey

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois - Jan. 9, 1919

Somewhere in France – Dec. 1, 1918

Dear Folks,

It has been some time since I have written you, but I have scarcely had time to write or do anything else but work.  I have been pretty busy night and day but we are getting things pretty well cleaned up now.  Today is the first Sunday I have had off in France.  I am willing to put in double working if it will only help to get us home sooner.  There was some talk of getting us home by Christmas but we will be in luck if we get to go that soon, considering the time we have been over here.  They have put our company in the First Army and if they do not change it, we can expect to be on our way before many more weeks.

I have not had any letters from any of you except Hazel.  There were a few letters forwarded from the states but none direct.  I wrote Bernie but did not hear from him.  I hope he did not get in that last drive.  If I only knew what division he was in, I would know about where he is.  I know he was in Co. A, 54 Infantry, but he never said what division. Some of the boys of my Company have ran across relatives and friends but I have never seen a familiar face among the thousands of soldiers I’ve seen.  We spent some Thanksgiving over here.  It rained all day long.  We celebrated by working.

I was glad to get off today as it gave me a change to get out and explore some of the country.  My pal and I took about a fifteen mile hike.  This part of the country is not so pretty as where we were before.  They are still censoring our mail so we can’t write what we want to, but I don’t think it will be long until I can tell it all personally.  I guess Hazel expected I would come home as soon as she heard the war was over.  I hope she does not have to wait much longer.  It sure has seemed a long time to me but it has been an experience worth the time.  I must close now hoping to see you all soon.

Your son,  Bert BAILEY

 

 

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois – Feb. 6, 1919 

Coblenz, Germany; Jan. 12, 1919

 Dear Folks,

Well today is Sunday and a work day for us too, but I managed to slip away and will write a letter.  I have had no chance to write the past week as we have been on the road all the time.  We have been placed in the Third army and were sent up here to occupy this portion of Germany.  We have no idea when we will be home.  There is plenty of work here at Coblenz for us for quite a awhile, and unless the Second Army relieves us this spring, we will not get home for some time yet.  We have charge of the clothing ware houses for the Third Army.  We have been doing this same kind of work in France, and hoped to be sent home when we finished there, but no such luck.  I like it fine here though, it is sure a pretty country.  We have not had any cold weather so far.  We have good quarters and plenty to eat and wear so I suppose if we have plenty of patience they will send us they will send us home in due time.  You know it kinda hurts when some of the boys are going home and you can’t go.  They are giving us a chance to see a little of the world anyway, but they don’t forget to mix quite a little work along with it.

Coblenz is quite a large place and is on the Rhine river.  We get quite a lot of freedom and have a chance to get out and see some of the city.  I guess it will be some time before I get any mail, as a move always means a wait for mail.  I left Florery, France, just a week ago today.  George MILLER was down to see me as we were getting on the train to leave.  I think they will be kept there for some time.  I outfitted him with boots, shoes, and a leather coat before I left.  His company had not been able to get the many new clothes.  I have not heard any more about the 6th Division so I don’t know whether Bernie has arrived home yet.  I suppose most all the drafted men have returned from the camps by this time.  As it is getting close to supper time will have to close.  Write often and address me the same as usual.  Love to all.

Your son,    Bert Bailey

 

 

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois – March 13, 1919         

Goblenz, Germany – Feb. 9, 1919

Dear Folks,

Well I have received a letter from you at last, it was written Dec. 2, over two months old, but welcome at that.  There is not much to write from here.  We never hear anything about going home and that is the news I wish I could write.  It is the same old thing day after day and it gets tired some.  I consider myself lucky tho as long as can keep well.  There is an awful lot of sickness and many of them are dying.  I have not had a sick day since I have been here.  I am anxious to hear from Bernie again.  He is with the 6th Division and I wondered if they were scheduled to return anyways soon.  I was reading in the paper not long ago that they were drilling down in France.  They always drill the troops before sending them home.  I am still working at the same old job.  The soldiers have it fine here, they all have to work but the conditions are much better than they had it in France.  Today is Sunday and we had to work a half day but we got the afternoon off.  We don’t have to go work till 8 o’clock in the morning and quit at 1:15 for dinner, and 4:15 at night.

           We have been having some real winter the past few days but we have plenty of warm clothes.  I went to the Red Cross last week and got sox and a new sweater.  We have five blankets to sleep under so there is no use for us to get cold.

           There is sure a lot of soldiers in Germany now, more Americans than anyone else.  They seem to get along pretty well with the Dutch for some of the fellows even have Dutch girls.  I hope to hear from you soon.

                Love to all,  Bert BAILEY

 


 

Gene Bailey

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 18, 1954 – “Gene BAILEY arrived at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas, last week for basic training.” 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 20, 1954 – “Pfc. Gene BAILEY of Scott Field spent the weekend with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C.E. BAILEY.” 

 


 

 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 3, 1945 – “S. Sgt. Lloyd BAILEY arrived here Saturday from Washington, D.C. to spend a 30 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Cecil BAILEY and family.  It was a happy reunion of this good family, especially the following day when all the children were home again, a day looked forward to for the past 2 years.   Sgt. BAILEY entered the service Dec. 1, 1942.  After training in various camps in the United States, he shipped overseas in May 1943, as a paratrooper.  He landed in England where he received further training.  His outfit crossed into France on D-Day.  Near St. Lo, France on July 31, 1944, he was wounded by machine gun battles piercing his leg.  He was then sent back to a hospital in England where he recovered.  The monotony of this hospital was too much for him after he was well again.  And on Aug. 29, he “went over the hill”, hitch-hiked a ride across the Channel into France and joined his old outfit in Belgium.  On Sept. 25, near Aachean, Germany, he was wounded again by a machine gun bullet entering his right wrist, rendering his army useless.  He was again returned to a hospital in England where he received treatment.  He landed back in the States Feb. 2, and entered the Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C., Feb. 5, where he remained until coming home.  We are happy to report Sgt. BAILEY thinks that in time, with the great medical skill in the army, he will regain the use of his hand.  And we sure wish him the best of luck with it.  He wears the following decorations: Good Conduct Ribbon, Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster, and the European Theater of Operations Badge with 3 stars, representing the Battles of Normandy, Southern France and Germany.  Sgt. BAILEY says he did not receive our paper regularly after crossing into France as he was on the move too much.  But he did receive several, mostly in bunches, which sure looked mighty good to him.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 5, 1945 – “S. Sgt. Lloyd BAILEY, son of Mr. and Mrs. Cecil BAILEY, arrived here Thursday evening after spending a few days in Kankakee with this sister, Miss Juanita BAILEY.  He received his discharge papers from the Walter Reed General Hospital in Washington, D.C., on June 19th on account of disability.  Sgt. BAILEY entered the service on Dec. 1942, and shipped overseas in May 1943 as a paratrooper.  Near St. Lo, France, on July 31, 1944, he was wounded by machine gun bullets piercing his leg.  After recuperating from these wounds, he was again in the front line.  On Sept. 25, 1944, near Aschen, Germany, he again was wounded by machine gun fire, the bullets penetrating his right wrist, rendering his hand useless.  He landed back in the States on Feb. 2, and was sent to the Walter Reed Hospital, where he has since been a patient.  In May, he was permitted to spend a 30 day furlough here with homefolks.  Lloyd wears the Good Conduct Ribbon, the Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster, and the European Theater of Operation with 3 stars, representing the battles of Normandy, Southern France and Germany.”

 

(V-226b) Lloyd Bailey

 


 

 

(V-349) Ray Bailey

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - July 13, 1944 - "Here’s one from Cpl. Ray BAILEY, who doesn’t say just where he is located at the present time. However, we do know that he is overseas some where. He says: Just a few lines to let you know my new address and to thank you for the paper. I have been receiving the paper regularly up until a few weeks ago. I guess the mail will get straightened out soon. The paper really means a lot to us boys away from home. A lot of the boys from other parts of the country enjoy reading our hometown paper, too. I know mine is passed around to a lot of the boys. I wish it was possible to find some of the boys from home, who are in the same are as I, but it is rather difficult. We are not allowed to tell where we are, but I like it very much. In closing I wish to thank you again for the paper, and I hope all the boys are home soon to thank you personally."

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Nov. 2, 1944 - "Here’s a short note from Cpl. Ray BAILEY, who is now in Belgium. He says: I have only time to write a few lines tonight. I received 5 papers in the past week, the first since I left England. I wish to thank you very much, as the hometown paper really means a lot to us over here. I like it better here in Belgium than I did in France. It is much colder here, but not so damp as in France. There are a lot of things I would like to tell you about, but I cannot, as yet. My time and paper are nearly gone so I will close for this time."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 31, 1946 –“Cpl. Ray BAILEY, son of Bert BAILEY, of Kankakee, spent the first of last week here with his grandmother, Mrs. Victoria BAILEY.  He was discharged at Camp Grant, Jan. 17.  Cpl. BAILEY entered the service in Sept. 1943 and shipped overseas in June 1944, landing in England.  From there he went to France, Belgium, Holland and Germany with the First Army.  He sailed from Marseilles, France for home, Jan. 1, landing in New York, Jan. 1th.  Cpl. BAILEY wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon, and the European Theater Ribbon with 4 stars, representing the campaigns of Normandy, Northern France, Ardennes and the Rhineland.  As to his future, Ray says he is undecided at the present.”

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

(V-140) Dale Baker

 


 

Frank Baker - “The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 24, 1946 –“Omega: Frank BAKER, who was recently discharged from the army, spent a few days of last week with his mother, Mrs. Maye BAKER.”

 


 

 

 

(V-141 & V-406)) Curt Ballance

 


   

 

 

 

 

 (V-307) Calvin L. Barbee

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 10, 1946 –“Calvin L. BARBEE, QM3c, son of Mr. and Mrs. Guy BARBEE, arrived home last Monday to spend a leave with relatives and friends.  Calvin entered service in Nov. 1944.  He took his boot training at Great Lakes.  From there he was dispatched to Schomaker, Calif., where he was assigned to the USS Wm. C. Miller, a destroyer escort.  Calvin did quite a bit of globe trotting with a special task force of the Third Fleet, during the 8 months he was overseas.  This group led the attacks of the Gilbert and Marshall Islands, Guam, Saipan, and Tokyo Bay.  This unit was one of the first to enter Tokyo Bay.  Calvin is authorized to wear the American Theater Ribbon and the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with 1 Bronze Star for the Third Fleet’s participation in the operations against Japan.  Calvin arrived back in the States Oct. 17 at the Kaiser Ship Yards, where his ship was decommissioned.  After his leave is up, he reports back to St Louis for reassignment.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 4, 1946 –“Calvin L. BARBEE, QM 3c, son of Mr. and Mrs. Guy BARBEE, who received his discharge at Great Lakes, June 19th.  Calvin was a recent visitor to Pearl Harbor, Marshall Islands, Carolina Islands, Guam, Saipan and Tokyo, aboard the Destroyer Escort 59.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


        

 

 

 

(V-227b) Lyle E. Barbee

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 28, 1945 – “With the 32nd Division in Northern Luzon, P.I. - Staff Sergeant, Lyle E. BARBEE of Kinmundy, Ill. has been promoted to his present rank from that of Corporal.  Entering the army in Jan. 1943, he has been in the SWPA for 24 months.  He saw his first combat with the 126th Infantry of the famed (Red Arrow) Division at Saidor, after which he fought at Aitape, Morotai and Leyte.  Recently he completed 119 consecutive days of action in the mountainous Lilla Verde-Santa Fe area in northern Luzon.  His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Guy BARBEE and wife, Sarah Olipe, lived in Kinmundy.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 9, 1945 – “With the 32nd Division in Northern Luzon, P.I. - Staff Sergeant Lyle E. BARBEE, who lives in Kinmundy, Ill., has been awarded the Combat Infantry Badge for exemplary conduct under enemy fire.  Entering the army in Jan. 1945, he has been with the 126th Infantry of the famed 32nd (Red Arrow) Division in the SWPA for 25 months.  He is a veteran of Saidor, Aitape, Morotai, and Leyte operations, and saw action in the Villa Verde-Santa Fe area in northern Luzon, where the 32 killed more than 9,000 Japanese during it’s 119 day drive up the tortuous Villa Verde Trail in the Caraballo Mountains.  His wife, Sarah Olive, lives in Kinmundy.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 25, 1945 – “S. Sgt. Lyle E. BARBEE arrived home on Oct. 17th with his discharge from the army.  His wife, Sarah, and 2 children and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Guy BARBEE reside in Kinmundy.   Lyle entered the army on Jan. 12, 1943, and shipped overseas on May 15, 1943 landing in Australia.  He was then in the beach landing on Saidor, and was also in the Aitap, Morati, Leyte, and Luzon campaigns.  He wears the Good Conduct Medal, Asia-Pacific Theater Campaign Ribbon, Philippine Liberation Ribbon, awarded 3 bronze stars for the New Guinea, Leyte, and Luzon Campaigns, and 5 overseas bars.  Lyle arrived in Seattle, Wash. on Oct. 7, and was sent to Jefferson Barracks where he received his discharge.  His plans for the future are undecided, as he wants to catch up on visiting with his daughter, as this was their first meeting.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 1, 1945 – “A picture was printed of S. Sgt. Lyle BARBEE, who arrived home Oct. 17th after receiving his discharge.  He is a veteran of the Asiatic-Pacific Theater.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

(V-228b)William J. Barbee

"The Kinmundy Express" - Jan. 27, 1944 - "Here’s one from Bill BARBEE, S2 c, who is sailing the seven seas. He says: Just a few lines to thank you for the paper. I am getting it almost every week now and enjoy it very much, even the other boys read it and ask who is this and did you know them. They read the letters from some of the boys and laugh and say I wish I could write him a letter. I believe they would stop talking about being on maneuvers and how rugged is was. Maneuvers are just a small part of what most of them will probably go thru with before it is over, but let’s hope not. It is good to know what a soldier goes thru before he goes overseas. But as for sleeping on rocks. I believe they usually can find a smooth place to lay. My address has changed a little as you will see from the last one. I can’t write much as you would like to know, but maybe some day I can write more freely and give you the low down on things. Thanks again for the paper and tell everyone I said ‘hello’."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 1, 1945 – “William J. BARBEE, Coxswain, son of Mrs. Maude BARBEE, arrived home Oct. 25, after receiving his discharge from the Navy at Great Lakes, Ill., the day previous.  William entered the service July 17, 1942, and received his boot training at Great Lakes, Ill.  After boot training, he reported to Pensacola, Fla., and from there to Seattle, Wash.  He left Seattle July 22, 1943 for the Aleutian Islands where he saw some action and was stationed there until his return to the states, January 5, 1945.  At that time, he was granted a 30 day leave, which was spent here with his mother.  After his leave expired he reported for duty at Jacksonville, Fla., where he remained until being sent to Great Lakes for his discharge.  William wears the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 8, 1945 – “A picture was printed of William J. BARBEE, Coxswain, son of Mrs. Maude BARBEE, who received his discharge from the Navy, Oct. 24th.  He spent 18 months in the Aleutian Islands.”

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

George H. Bargh, Jr.

"The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 24, 1946 –“PFC George Junior BARGH has returned to Kearns, Utah after enjoying a furlough here with his mother, Mrs. Mildred BARGH, and brother, Jo.”

 

"The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 5, 1946 –“Sgt. George BARGH returned home last Friday after serving 16 months in the army.  Sgt. BARGH was stationed in Kearns, Utah.  After his discharge, Sept. 9, he will return to his studies at the U. of I., Champaign.”

 


(V-407) John "Jack" Barksdale, Jr.

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 9, 1954 – “Pfc. Jackson BARKSDALE, whose wife, Paula, lives on Rt. 2, Alma, is now serving in Korea with the 3rd Infantry Division.  The “Rock of Marne” division which saw bitter fighting in the Iron Triangle and at Outpost Harry, is now training as part of the U.S. security force on the peninsula.  He is son of H.J. BARKSDALE, Salem, and is a member of Battery B of the 3rd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion.  He entered the army in Apr. 1953, and has been in Korea since last November.” 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 7, 1955 – “Mr. and Mrs. H.J. BARKSDALE were hosts Sunday at a dinner honoring their son, Cpl. Jack BARKSDALE, who was home for the weekend before reporting to Ft. Sheridan for separation from the Armed Forces.  Cpl. BARKSDALE has just finished 18 months service in Korea.  The dinner was also a delayed birthday celebration for Cpl. BARKSDALE and his sister, Janet.  Five generations were represented.  Guests included: Mr. and Mrs. Clarence BARKSDALE, Mr. Will COX, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. LONG, Mrs. Etta BARKSDALE, Cpl. and Mrs. Jack BARKSDALE, and daughter, Judy.” 

 


 

(V-479) Lester Basom and his wife, Marie (Embser) Basom

 


 

BASS family

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 27, 1945 – “The family of Mr. and Mrs. Joe BASS, formerly of this city, enjoyed the gathering of their family at their home in Rock Falls, Ill. on Dec. 16.  All were present except 2, who were unable to come, their son, Edwin BASS, and family of Centralia, and daughter and family, Mrs. Malcolm RICE of Hot Springs, Ark.  The day was spent visiting and taking pictures.  Mr. and Mrs. BASS have enjoyed having their 4 sons with them, who saw action overseas, 3 of whom are discharged.  Their son, Pearl E., is at Schicks General Hospital in Clinton, Iowa, and expects to be discharged in about 4 months.  Also, as a special guest was the fiancé of their son, Everett, Miss Roberta RAYMOND.  This was the first time in 4 years that their 4 soldier sons were together.”

 


 

Everett Bass

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 5, 1945  - “Here’s one from Pvt. Everett BASS, now Somewhere in Germany.  Everett is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe BASS, former residents of this city.  He says: Just a few lines to let you know that I am receiving the paper O.K.  I look forward for each issue.  I have been in combat several months and I have been in some tough spots.  I met one of the boys from near Kinmundy.  His name is S. Sgt. Hillard MORRIS.  I just had time to talk with him for a few minutes, but we enjoyed our visit very much.  He has a mortar squad.  I had word from my brother, who was slightly wounded in Manila.  He was hit by a sniper’s bullet in the arm, but is still going strong.  It will be nice when all of us can come home to our loved ones.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 19, 1945 – “Here’s one from Pvt. Everett BASS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe BASS, former residents of this city.  His letter is dated 4 April in Germany, and says: Just a few lines to let you know that I am still receiving the Kinmundy Express and enjoy it very much.  I am Somewhere in Germany.  We are forbidden to fraternize with the civilians, but otherwise conditions are not so bad.  The scenery is certainly beautiful.  The rolling hills, green grass, trees budding, etc.  They have small patches of soil plowed here and there and it makes a pattern like quiltwork.  Easter has come and gone and I hope by next Easter that all of us can be home with our loved ones.  I met Sgt. Hillard MORRIS a few days ago and had a short talk with him.  He is looking fine and healthy.  It looks as though this war may be over and it sure can’t be too soon.  Well, I must say Cheerio to everyone.

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 16, 1945 – “With the 28th Infantry Division in Assembly Area Command - PFC Everett D. BASS is enroute home from the European Theater of Operations with the veteran “Bloody Division”, which in 8 months saw vicious combat action from Normandy’s hedge rows to the heart of the Reich.  The 28th quits its occupational duties in Germany July 5th and moved to Camp Pittsburgh, one of Assembly Area Command’s 17 redeployment camps near Reims.  Entering action July 30, 1944, at St. Lo, the “Bloody Bucket” men battled across Normandy, paraded through Paris, proceeded east through Belgium and Luxembourg, and smashed into the Sigfried Line Sept. 11th - the first troops to enter Germany in strength.  After its November fight in Hurtgen Forest, the 28th moved to the “quiet” Luxembourg sector.  On Dec. 16, it caught full force of Von Rundstedt’s Ardnesses offensive.  Quickly recuperating, the 28th moved south to help liberate Colmar in Alsace and drive to the Rhine.  Within a month, it was again at the Rhine near Coblenz.  PFC BASS is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe BASS, R.R. 2, Rock Falls, Ill., formerly of this city.”

 


 

Pearl E. Bass

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 23, 1945 – “Mr. and Mrs. Joe BASS of Rock Falls, former residents of Kinmundy, have received word from their son, Sgt. Pearl E. BASS, telling them he has been suffering with a broken leg.  He was injured by a falling coconut tree.  Another son of theirs, Everett D., is home after serving 22 months in the E.T.O.  He served in Normandy, Northern France, Germany and Central Europe.  He is authorized to wear 5 bronze campaign stars.  He will report Sept. 7 at Camp Grant for reassignment.”

 


 

Robert Bass

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 5, 1945 – “Here’s a nice letter from T4 Robert BASS, dated 10 June, Eisloben, Germany.  He says: Just a few lines to let you know how much I am enjoying the Kinmundy paper.  I like best to read the nice letters you print in it from the boys of Kinmundy.  I sure wish I could meet some of them.  I am now at Eisloben, Germany.  It sure has been a long road from Normandy Beach.  I am sure a lot of the Kinmundy boys have traveled through the same country I have.  I say traveled, because you see, I wasn’t exactly in the front lines, being in the medics and with an Engineer Battalion Aid Station.  A lot of the boys ere in the front lines building bridges under enemy fire.  I consider myself lucky as I have never heard a bullet sing past my head, but have heard plenty of 88 shells coming and have had several close calls from bombs at the beaches of St. Lo, and in Germany.  I sure wish I could of visited with Lt. Grace ARNOLD.  You see, we used to live neighbors with them when they lived on the George REESE place, west of town.  I never was able to find out what hospital she worked at.  I was sure glad to hear she was back in the states again.  I sure hope when some of the boys I know write to you again they are able to say what town they are in and what outfit, so I can be on the lookout for them.  Well, Mr. VALLOW, this is about all I can think of this time, and I thank you again for the paper and so long for this time.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 27, 1945 – “Here’s a nice letter from T4 Robert BASS, who is now on his way home from France.  He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe BASS of Rock Falls, Ill., and former residents of this community.  He says: Just a few lines this time to say Hello and let you know that I will be on my road home in the near future.   So if my subscription runs out, just stop sending the paper.  I will try to renew it when I get home.  The last paper I received was dated Aug. 23rd and I want you to know, that I have enjoyed your paper very much.  I was hoping to see Lt. ATKINS, but of course, he was in Italy.  There has been several boys from Kinmundy over here but I wasn’t lucky enough to see them.  I was sorry that I missed D.A. ARNOLD and his sister, Lt. Grace.  But was sure glad they got home safe.  As I understand it, Lt. Grace is in the hospital in Denver, Colo.  I hope she gets well soon, and while she is there she should try to visit the Garden of the Gods and Seven Falls.  There are a lot of other places there that are very interesting too.  These places are at Colorado Springs, Colo., which is about 30 or 40 miles south of Denver.  You see, I spent about a year at Camp Carson, which is located about 6 miles south of Colorado Springs.  It is about the most beautiful spot I have ever visited.  Well, Mr. VALLOW, news is short so I will close for this time.  Give my best regards to the old-timers around Kinmundy and I hope to make Kinmundy a visit when I get home.  I want to thank you again for the paper.  I have enjoyed it very much.”

 


 

Florence (Doolen) Bassett

 

"The Salem Republican" - Salem, IL - Jan. 26, 1943 - "County's First WAAC, Miss Florence Doolen Writes of Training"

 

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Aug. 30, 1945 - "Cpl. Florence Doolen Receives Discharge"

 

 

Florence (Doolen) Bassett in WAC uniform - WWII

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-23) Florence (Doolen) Bassett in WAAC uniform

 


 

 

 

 

 

( V-229b) - James A. Bassett

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - May 18, 1944 - "Here’s one from Sgt. James A. BASSETT, who is now in the South Pacific. He says: I have been intending to write, but I just haven’t done it. I hope you will be kind enough to excuse me for not writing before. But you know how easy it is to put off writing. I hope this finds everyone around the old home town is in good health, especially around the editorial mansion. I still get the paper and I want you to know how much I appreciate it. I don’t get them as often or as soon as I would like to, but I get them and that is the main thing. There are a lot of things in the paper that I wouldn’t know if I didn’t read it there. Maybe you knew, or perhaps you didn’t that Harold was a buddy of mine. He and I were inducted at the same time and had always been in the same company until he was sent home. You probably heard Guin speak of him. I hear from him about once a month. As you know I have been in the South and Southwest Pacific for the past 2 years and I am getting enough of it. Did I say getting? I have gotten enough of it a long time ago. I used to think it would be nice to be where it never snows, but I don’t think so anymore. I think it would be nice to wallow in a nice deep snow drift. But things could be a lot worse. We have a movie every other night. So you see we have some recreation. I will bring this to a close before I bore you with this nonsense."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 12, 1945 – “Mr. and Mrs. Ernest BASSETT were made extremely happy last Saturday morning to see their son, Sgt. James A. BASSETT, come home after spending 41 months overseas.  They knew that he was back in the states but they didn’t know just when he would arrive home.  This happy couple feel like they are sitting on top of the world now as this was the second son to return home from overseas.  Sgt. BASSETT entered the service March 20, 1941, and shipped overseas Jan. 23, 1942 landing in Australia.  From there he went to new Caledonia, then to Guadacanal, the Fiji Islands, Bougainville, and then the Philippines.  He landed back here in the states on June 28.  Upon his arrival at Ft. Sheridan, they found that he had 105 points and so they handed him his discharge papers rather than a furlough.  Sgt. BASSETT wears the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Good Conduct Medal, the Pre-Pearl Harbor Ribbon, the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with 3 stars representing the battles of Guadacanal, Bougainville, and the Philippines.  He also wears the Philippine Liberation Ribbon with 1 star, presented by the Philippine Government.  He was a member of the 132d Infantry Battalion.  Sgt. BASSETT has a brother, PFC Lawrence, in the service who is now stationed at Camp McCoy, Wis., after spending 32 months in the Southwest Pacific Theater.  Sgt. BASSETT says all he wants to do now is just lie around home and get caught up on his loafing as well as eating his fill of mother’s fried chicken.”

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-194)  J. Marvin Bassett & Nellie Fern (Belcher) Bassett

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 20, 1945 – “S. Sgt. Marvin BASSETT is spending a 30 day furlough with his family in Patoka and with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James BASSETT of the Zion neighborhood, after spending the past 6 months abroad.  Sgt. BASSETT entered the service Jan. 14, 1942, and shipped overseas Feb. 10, 1945 landing in France.  From there he went to Germany with an Ordnance Depot Company of the 15th Army.  He started for the Southwest Pacific on Aug. 11th, but the course was changed while on high seas and his ship docked at Boston on Aug. 20th.  He arrived home on Aug. 27th.  After spending his furlough here, he will be sent to Fort Bliss, Texas.  Sgt. BASSETT wears the Good Conduct Medal and the European Theater of Operations Ribbon with one star, representing the battle of the Rhineland.  On May 4, 1944, Sgt. BASSETT and Miss Nellie Fern BELCHER, of Patoka, were married.  They now have a 4 months old daughter, Donna Marlene.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 18, 1945 – “East Zion: S. Sgt. James Marvin BASSETT left Saturday night for Camp Grant after spending a 45 day furlough here with his wife and daughter and parents and sister.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-398) James Marvin Bassett

 


 

 

 

 

(V-230b) - Lawrence Bassett

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Aug.10, 1944 -

"Here’s a nice letter from PFC Lawrence H. BASSETT, who has been in the South West Pacific for quite sometime. He says: The usual thing as usual, I have been intending to write but just put it off. That is very easy to do as you cannot write everything you would like to. Some things if you wrote about, they would only be cut out so what is the use of writing in the first place. Your letter would have looked like the mice got ahold of it. As I have been getting the paper for some time and have put off writing, hope you will excuse me this time. Hope this finds everyone in good health, especially around the mansion. The papers you have been sending have been coming along alright so far. Only when I was in New Guinea, they were slightly slow, but they came and that was what counted. There is plenty of news in the home town paper that I wouldn’t know about if it wasn’t for your thoughtfulness in sending me and the other boys the home town news. As you know by now, I also have a brother over here on this side of the Pacific. I have been over here about the same length of time he has. Been hoping to run into him some time, but that hasn’t happened yet. I have seen all the Islands of the Pacific I care to see. It will do me for a mighty long time. It may be nice to some people where it never snows, but for myself, I would rather see some snow once in a while. Long as I have been over here, I have only seen ice twice. Still in all, it could have been lots worse. I have been gone from my old outfit for some time now. Sure would like to run into some of the boys from there and also some from home. I have seen the TROUT boy twice since I came over. He is the only one. There are plenty of others over here, as I get letters from home telling me or see it in the home town paper. I will bring this bit of chatter to a stop. Good luck to you all."

 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 28, 1945 – “PFC Lawrence BASSETT and wife returned to Camp McCoy, Wis., Monday after spending a 10 day furlough here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E.O. BASSETT.  PFC Lawrence was here for 22 days last fall after spending 29 months overseas.  He entered the service Nov. 25, 1941, and was sent overseas on April 22, 1942, landing in Australia.  He remained there until Jan. 1943 when he was sent to New Guinea and then back to Australia in Oct. 1943.  There he remained until he started back to the states on Sept. 14, 1944.  He arrived in Kinmundy Oct., there he spent a very enjoyable 22 days.  From here he was sent to a rest camp in Florida for 14 days and then shipped to Camp McCoy, Wis., where he has since been stationed.  It was at this camp where he met Miss Leah JOHNSON of Tomah, Wis., and on May 16, they were wed.  This was the bride’s first trip to Southern Illinois and she says that she likes this part of the country fine.  We sincerely hope this good couple will make this community their home after this war is over.  PFC BASSETT wears the Good Conduct Ribbon, the Pre-Pearl Harbor Ribbon, and the Asiatic Pacific Ribbon with 2 stars, representing the battles of Papu and New Guinea.  He has 1 brother in the service, Cpl. James BASSETT, who has been in the Southwest Pacific for 3 years.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 11, 1945 – “PFC and Mrs. Lawrence BASSETT arrived here last Saturday to visit their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest BASSETT.  And it may be that they will make their home in this community as Lawrence received his discharge from the army at Camp McCoy, Wis. on Sept. 27th.  Lawrence spent almost 4 years in the army, 29 months of which was spent in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater.  After his return to the states, he spent a very enjoyable 30 day furlough here with his parents.  He was then sent to Miami, Fla., and then to Camp McCoy, Wis.  On May 16th, he was married to Miss Leah JOHNSON, of Tomah, Wis.  We are truly glad to welcome this lad and his wife and sincerely hope they will see fit to settle down in this community.”

 


 

James O. Bassett

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 7, 1970 – “James O. BASSETT, son of Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Bassett, Alma, was recently promoted to Army specialist four while serving with the 27th Transportation Battalion near Qui Nhon, Vietnam.  Spec. 4 Bassett, a radio operator with the Battalion’s Headquarters Detachment, entered the Army in August, 1969, completed basic training at Ft. Campbell, Ky., and was stationed at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., prior to arriving overseas.  A 1966 graduate of Kinmundy-Alma High School, the 22 year old specialist received his A.S. degree in 1968.  The specialist attended Kaskaskia Junior College Centralia, Ill., and the Southern Ill. University at Carbondale.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 29, 1970 – “James O. BASSETT, son of Mr. and Mrs. James M. Bassett, Alma, recently was promoted to Army Sergeant while serving with the 27th Transportation Battalion in Vietnam.  Sgt. Bassett, a documentation noncommissioned officers with Battalion Headquarters Detachment, entered the U.S. Army in Aug. 1969 and was last stationed at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo.  The 22 year old soldier received his A.S. Degree from the Kaskaskia Junior College at Shattuc, Ill. in1968.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 5, 1971 – “Sgt. James O. BASSETT, Fort Lee, Va., is spending a 10 day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Bassett and family, rural Alma.”

 


 

Larry Bassett - “The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 2, 1969 – “Pvt. Larry BASSETT, Danville, and a former resident of Kinmundy, is receiving his training at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. after entering the armed services on Thanksgiving.”

 


 

 

 

(V-61) Merle Baylis

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Nov. 2, 1944 - "Here’s one from Pvt. Merle BAYLIS, who is still taking in the sights of Italy. He says: Just a few lines to thank you for the paper and I want you to know I am very glad to get it. And by the paper I get a lot of news I would not know about if it were not for the paper. I am over here somewhere in Italy, and so far I am in the same territory from the time I landed here. The place is very attractive for scenery, mountains on 2 sides of us. I would like to mention more about this are, but the censor might begin to frown so I better not tell any more about this place. So far I can say for myself, I have been very luck this far. I have plenty of good food and a good place to sleep and I am working in the officers mess. I have also visited Napels several times and 2 different times I took the Red Cross bus and went to Pompei to see the ruins caused by Mt. Vesuvius which was uncovered around 2000 years ago, that is some of the city was uncovered. And it is very interesting to see how, the people lived in those days, and I went to see Mt. Vesuvius and also I went up to the very top along with some other boys. It was a hard climb, but it was worth it. Sure is a large crater and still smoking and I hope to tell you more about it when I see you. I only hope this war will soon come to a close and I think it will be over with Germany this year. I am sending in this letter 2 pieces of Italian money to you. One lire is Allied currency and the other lire is their original lire. The weather here at present is fine, only hope it continues that way. I suppose this is enough of this kind of writing, so I will close for this time."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 22, 1945 – “PFC Merle BAYLIS is here visiting with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo BAYLIS, after receiving his discharge at Ft. Knox, Kentucky on Nov. 8th.  Merle entered the service Nov. 30, 1942, and shipped overseas July 1, 1944, landing in Italy, where he served with the 7th Replacement Depot Headquarters Co. in Italy, and worked with the 1379th Engineers Pet. Distributing company in France.  Merle wears the Good Conduct Medal, the American Theater of Operations Ribbon, the European-African-Middles Eastern Theater of Operations Ribbon with 2 stars, representing the battles of Appennines and Rhineland.  After Merle has finished with his visiting, he will return to his old job in Sterling, Ill.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 29, 1945 – “PFC Merle BAYLIS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo BAYLIS, who received his discharge Nov. 8th, at Fort Knox, Ky.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arthur M. Beals

 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 25, 1945 – “Mrs. Frank HOYT of Salem, but formerly of this city, received word last week, from the War Dept., announcing her son by a former marriage, Pvt. Arthur M. BEALS, was killed in action in Germany 3 April.  Pvt. BEALS entered the service July 31, 1944, and was sent overseas in February.  He lacked 23 days of attaining his 19th birthday when killed.  He was a gunner with the 5th Tank Battalion.”

 


 

Austin Beard -  “The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 6, 1945 – “Pleasant Grove (from last week): Cpl. Austin BEARD, who has been overseas for several months, arrived here Wednesday at the Fred MULVANEY home for a 30 day furlough with his wife and 22 month old son, whom he has not seen since he was about 1 month old, and his parents and other relatives.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-112) Ronald D. Beard

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 2, 1964 – “Pvt. Ronald BEARD who had spent the holidays with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert BEARD, left St. Louis by plane, Monday morning for South Carolina, from where he will leave for Panama to attend a Communication School in the U.S. Army.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 1, 1964 –“Army PFC Ronald D. BEARD, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Beard, Kinmundy, qualified for expert in firing the M-14 rifle at Fort Clayton, Canal Zone, Sept. 14.  The 23-year-old soldier, a radio operator in the 601st Medical Company at Fort Clayton, entered the Army in Oct. 1963.  He completed basic training at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo.  Beard is a 1963 graduate of Kinmundy-Alma High School.   Before entering the Army, he was employed by the Illinois Central Railroad Co., Chicago.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 30, 1965 –“Sp/4 Ronald BEARD, having spent 2 years with the U.S. Army, arrived home Wednesday, after receiving his discharge in Jackson, S.C."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Charles M. Bee

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 6, 1955 – “Pvt. Charles M. BEE, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles O. BEE, Alma, is a member of the 2nd Infantry Division at Ft. Lewis, Wash.  BEE, a radio operator in the 2nd Signal Company, entered the Army in Jan. 1955, and completed basic training at Camp Chaffee, Ark.  He is a former student at the Univ. of Illinois.” 

 


 

Charles Berry -  “The Kinmundy Express” – June 13, 1946 –“Meadow Branch: Sgt. Charles BERRY returned home from Germany, Friday morning.  He entered the service in June ‘44, and was discharged at Ft. Sheridan, June 6th.  He was sent first to Little Rock, Ark., then to Oklahoma, and Texas and in Feb. ‘46 to Germany, where he remained 5 months.  He and his wife moved up into their own home in Kinmundy, Monday.”

 


 

John C. Beery

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 14, 1956 – “Army Specialist Third Class John C. BEERY, son of Mr. and Mrs. Guy L. BEERY, Kinmundy was recently assigned to the 9th Infantry Division in Germany.  Specialist BEERY, a truck driver in the division, entered the army in June 1953, and completed basic training at Ft. Riley, Kansas.  He arrived in Europe in Nov. of 1953.”

 


 

John R. Black

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 13, 1973 – “Airman John R. BLACK, son of Mr. and Mrs. George J. BLACK, of R.R. 2, Kinmundy, Ill., has been assigned to Sheppard AFB, Tex., after completing Air Force basic training.  The airman has been assigned to the Technical Training Center at Sheppard, for specialized training as a medical services specialist.  Airman Black is a 1972 graduate of Union-Whitten Community High School, Union, Iowa."  (A photo was included with this article.)

 


 

Charles F. Blomberg

“The Kinmundy Express” – Apr. 30, 1953 – “Army Pvt. Charles F. BLOMBERG, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles BLOMBERG of Kinmundy, recently arrived in Korea for duty with the 44th Engineer Construction Group. He attended Illinois University before entering the Army a year ago.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 17, 1953 – “We have been informed that Pfc. Charles BLOMBERG will celebrate his birthday on Sept. 30 in Pusan, Korea. (His address was included.)”

 


 

Donald L. Blomberg

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 22, 1956 – “Army Pvt. Donald L. BLOMBERG, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles BLOMBERG, Kinmundy, recently began six months active duty training at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo., under the Reserve Forces Act.  He is receiving 8 weeks basic combat training, which will be followed by advanced individual and unit training.  Men volunteering for the 6 months tour of active duty are permitted to finish their military obligation in local Army Reserve or National Guard units.  The 18 year old soldier is a 1956 graduate of LaGrove Community H.S.”

 


 

 

(V-308) Thomas A. Boone

"The Kinmundy Express" - June 29, 1944 - "Here’s a V-Mail from Pvt. Thomas BOONE, who is some where in New Guinea. He says: I am setting in my tent listening to it rain. It has rained for the last 48 hours continually. It rains here almost all of the time, but lets up for an hour or so every day. When the sun does shine it is really hot and dries the ground up in a few hours. I have been here a little over 3 weeks. Work almost every day, but the work is not hard. We have a picture show that we can go to free and they give us the news every night. Cigarettes are about 40 cents a carton in American money. We can have all the cocoanuts we want to eat if we want to pick them up. I haven’t received a Kinmundy paper since I have been here. I believe a March issue was the last. I have been on the move since February and haven’t been in one place over 6 weeks so they haven’t had time to catch up with me. I have got to see lots of the world in the last 10 months. But I wouldn’t give one foot of Illinois for it all. I haven’t seen many white women as the only ones here are Red Cross workers and nurses and there are only a few of those. Well it is almost bedtime and the wind has blown my candles out 3 times, so far. So will close for tonight."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 13, 1945 – “Word has been received from PFC Thomas A. BOONE, that he has been promoted to the rank of Corporal.  He is still stationed in New Guinea, where he has been for the past 16 months, and says he is hoping to be home by this time next year.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 24, 1946 –“Cpl. Thomas BOONE, son of Mayor and Mrs. Corral A. BOONE, arrived home last week after receiving his discharge at San Antonio, Jan. 9th, and is now at home with his wife and daughter in Vandalia.  Thomas entered the service Sept. 7, 1943, and spent 18 months in Australia, New Guinea, and the Philippines.  He wears the Good Conduct Medal, the American Theater Ribbon, the Victory Ribbon and the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with 3 stars representing the campaigns of New Guinea, Luzon and Manila.  Thomas will return to his old position as a guard at the State Penal Farm at Vandalia, the first of the month.”

 

 

 

 


 

William Booth - "The Kinmundy Express” – April 6, 1961 - “Mrs. William BOOTH was happy to be able to talk to her husband in Seoul, Korea, March 30th.  SFC Booth is stationed in Korea for a year.  Mrs. Booth, the former Peggy Jackson, and her children are making their home with her mother, Mrs. A.J. Jackson, at the present time."

 


 

James Boston - “The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 20, 1945 – “Miletus: PFC James BOSTON arrived home last week with an honorable discharge, having served over 3 years with the U.S. Army.  He had been stationed at Ft. Lewis, Wash., and served as a cook."

 


 

(V-408) Art Boyd

“Cpl. Arthur BOYD, son of Mr. and Mrs. Melvin BOYD, arrived home, Dec. 31, after receiving his discharge the same day at Camp Grant.  Cpl. BOYD entered the service Feb. 13, 1942, and shipped overseas Oct. 21, 1943, landing in Scotland.  From there he went to England and then to France and Germany.  He started home Dec. 13, landing at Norfolk, Va., Dec. 24.  He wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon, the American Theater Ribbon, and the European Theater Ribbon.  He was attached to the 44th Air Depot Group with the 9th Air Force.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

(V-233b)  T. Frank Boyd

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 16, 1945 – “By direction of the president, the award of the Silver Star was made to Thomas F. BOYD, for gallantry in action on 24 April, in the city of Burgau, Germany.  When the patrol of which he was as member was ambushed, by the enemy, T4 BOYD remaining fully exposed to small arms fire and hand grenades, distracted the enemy’s attention from the other members of the patrol until they were in position to withstand the attack.  Still under heavy fire, he and his patrol leader defused two 500 lbs. bombs which were prepared to blow the bridge.  By his courageous action T4 BOYD saved the patrol from many casualties and failure in it’s mission.  His action was an inspiration to the men, resulted in the capture of the bridge, and opened a route vital to the advance of friendly elements.  Thomas Frank BOYD, son of Mr. and Mrs. Melvin BOYD, entered the service June 17, 1941.  He had his basic training in Louisiana.  Soon after he was sent to Kentucky for training as a radio operator, and on to Texas for further training.  He arrived in England and soon after in France, and on into Germany where the award was presented.  Frank is with the 92nd “Charley” Division at the present time.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 13, 1945 – “T4 Frank BOYD, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mel BOYD, arrived home Dec. 10 after receiving his discharge at at Camp Grant the day previous.  Frank entered the service June 18, 1941 and shipped overseas Sept. 20, 1944, landing in England.  From there he went to France, then to Alsace, and then into Germany.  He started home Nov. 21, and landed in New York, Dec. 1.  Cpl. Frank wears the American Defense Ribbon, the American Theater Ribbon, the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon, the European Theater Ribbon with 2 stars representing the campaigns of Central Europe and the Rhineland, and the Silver Star, awarded for meritorious service.  We are all happy to have Frank back with us and he says he is happy to be back and is very thankful that he reached home in time for the last day of quail season.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 20, 1945 – “T4 Frank BOYD, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mel BOYD, who was discharged Dec. 9.  He served in the European Theater and served 14 months overseas.  He received the Silver Star for meritorious service.”

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-234b)  Fred Boyd

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 13, 1945 – “PFC Fred BOYD arrived home Saturday to again be with his family and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Mel BOYD.  He received his discharge at Camp Grant the day previous.  PFC Fred entered the service April 17, 1944, and was assigned to the Enlisted Transport Command with headquarters at New York.  He made 3 round trips to Europe and back.  PFC Fred wears the Good Conduct Medal, the American Theater Ribbon, the Victory Ribbon, the European Theater Ribbon, and the Unit Citation.  Mr. and Mrs. BOYD have 4 boys: Jack, 10; Bill, 8; Richard, 6; and Tom, 3.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 20, 1945 – “PFC Fred BOYD, local rural mail carrier, who was discharged Dec. 7th.  PFC Boyd was in the Enlisted Transport Command and made 3 round trips to Europe.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Jack Boyd

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 5, 1955 – “A 3C Jack BOYD arrived home Saturday from Lackland Air Base, San Antonio, Texas, on a 10 day leave before reporting to Amarillo Air Base, Amarillo, Texas.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 23, 1958 – “A 2c Jack BOYD recently received his discharge from the Air Force and arrived in Kinmundy on Oct. 17 to visit his father, Fred BOYD and family.”

 


 

William A. "Bill" Boyd

 “The Kinmundy Express” – May 23, 1968 – “Sp/4 Bill BOYD, Ft. Sills, Okla. is spending an 18 day furlough at home, after which he will leave for Ft. Lewis, Wash., enroute to Vietnam.  He was met in Joplin, Mo. by his mother, Mrs. Marge Boyd and fiancée, Miss Anne Lacey.

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 4, 1968 – “Army Specialist Four William A. BOYD, 20, son of Mrs. Marjorie Boyd, Kinmundy was assigned as an artillery surveyor in Howitzer Battery, 1st Squadron of the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment in Vietnam, June 15.”

 

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 6, 1969 – “Mrs. Marge BOYD received word from her son, William A. BOYD that he had been promoted from SP/4 to SP/5 the latter part of January.  SP/5 William A. Boyd is stationed in Vietnam.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 12, 1969 – “SP/5 Bill BOYD returned home Sunday evening after spending a year in Vietnam.  He will report for duty at Fort Sill, Okla.”

 


 

William D. Boyd

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 29, 1955 – “A 3C William D. BOYD, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred BOYD, Kinmundy, has entered the United States Air Force Technical Training School at Sheppard Air Force Base, located near Wichita Falls, Texas.  Upon completion of the course, along with the majority of graduates in his class, he will be assigned to one of the major Air Force Commands for on-the-job experience, or will enter a course of advanced training.  He entered the Air Force on June 6, 1955.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 5, 1956 – “A 3C Bill BOYD left Saturday for Wichita Falls, Texas after spending furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred BOYD.  He accompanied A 2C Don SAPP, who had been visiting his aunt, Mrs. Marge CORRELL to Texarkana, Texas enroute to Waco, Texas.”  

 


 

(V-142) Joe Bradley

 


 

Arlie C. Branson  - “The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 24, 1955 – “S. Sgt. Arlie C. BRANSON of Kinmundy and in the 2nd Marine Aircraft wing in Cherry Point, N.C., is taking part in major amphibious exercises.” 

 


 

Oggie Branson - “The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 18, 1945 – “Omega: Oggie BRANSON, who has been discharged from the army, was here Saturday.  A dinner was held at his mother’s home in Salem in his honor.”

 


 

Richard Branson - “The Kinmundy Express” – March 7, 1946 –“Word has been received by his wife that Lt. Richard BRANSON was one of the 18 survivors of a C-47 transport plane which crashed on Casiguron Sound off the East coast of Luzon.  The survivors were rescued and taken to a hospital in Manila for treatment.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Allen Brasel

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Oct. 26, 1944 - "PFC Allen BRASEL, Alma Lad, Loses Life in Action in Holland on Oct. 5th: Our neighboring village of Alma received more bad news yesterday when a telegram from the War Dept., addressed to Mr. and Mrs. Paul B. BRASEL stating their son PFC Allen Lawrence BRASEL, had been killed in action on Oct. 5, in Holland. This lad was well known in Meacham twp., also being the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas NEAL. The family also lived in Meacham twp. quite some time before moving to Alma. Allen, the eldest of 6 children, son of Paul B. and Sylvia NEAL BRASEL, was born in Taylorville on Feb. 29, 1924. He entered the service on Dec. 8, 1943, and received most of his training in South Carolina. He shipped overseas in June, 1944, landing in England and then on to France. His last furlough home was on May 5th, being granted 15 days before shipping overseas. The last letter received by the parents was dated Sept. 27. He was a member of the Co. E, 120th Infantry Battalion. PFC Allen was a good boy and no one has never heard naught about him. He was an ardent church worker and was a member of the Christian Church in Alma. Our hearts go out to this good family in their bereavement."

 

(V-185) Allen Brasel

 

 

(V-185b)  Allen Brasel funeral in Alma, Illinois

"The Kinmundy Express" - December 4, 1947 -  "A Soldier Boy Comes Back to His Home in Alma: As one passed through our neighboring village of Alma this week, you noticed the flag dancing in the breeze at half-mast. This was a tribute to Alma’s first returned War Dead. Seeing Old Glory floating at half-mast caused the passerby to stop for a moment and bow his head in silent prayer. This boy has come home - a hero. After having been away from his loved ones since May 5, 1944, Private First Class Allen L. BRASEL is home. As Train 123 came to stop in Kinmundy Monday morning, a tear came to the eye as the baggage door was opened and the flag-draped casket of PFC BRASEL was placed in the awaiting hearse. The honor guard of uniformed men stood at attention and gave a hand salute. One heard the soft cries from the broken hearts of the family. Then you stopped and thought that this is what our hero waited and hoped for - to come home. Hardly a day passed in his army life that he didn’t think about home and of all the swell things that went with it. He had dreams of what home would be like as he lay in the mud of Holland with the hell of war around him. On Oct. 5, 1944, in a battle near Kerkrade, Holland, PFC BRASEL met the Supreme Commander. The war and the hard road of life was over for him. Only 20 years of age - too young we may think, but this was God’s means of calling him to his Heavenly Home. Yes, PFC BRASEL gave his all for us so that we could go on with our way of life as free men and enjoy the fruits of our way of life. We hope that this boy, along with the thousands of other fallen heros, did not die in vain. We also hope that the leaders of the world powers will remember the golden rule and will carry it out to the fullest measure. PFC BRASEL entered the service of his country on Dec. 8, 1943 and received most of his training in South Carolina. He shipped overseas in June, 1944, landing in England and then on to France. He was a member of Company E, 120th Infantry Battalion. The mortal remains of PFC BRASEL were accompanied here from Chicago by Cpl. George M. DUNCAN, a veteran of World War II. The train was met by members of the family, friends, and a honor guard of uniformed men from Kinmundy Legion Post No. 519. The honor guard accompanied the body to the family home in Alma. Services were held yesterday from the Christian Church in Alma with Rev. WILSON officiating and Rev. HARD assisting. Interment was made in Alma cemetery under the auspices of Kinmundy Post No. 519, American Legend. PFC BRASEL was the eldest child of Mr. and Mrs. Paul BRASEL."


(V-409) Benny D. Brasel

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 25, 1951 – “Bennie D. BRASEL, seaman recruit, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. B.G. BRASEL of Rt. 1, Kinmundy, is undergoing recruit training at the Naval Training Center in Great Lakes, Ill.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 30, 1953 – “Benny D. BRASEL on Training Cruise: Ships of the 1953 Midshipman Practice Squadron now on their last 4 weeks of training operations will return to Norfolk, Va. in Aug. Aboard the small aircraft carrier USS Saipan is Benny D. BRASEL, radarman second class, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. B.G. BRASEL. Before returning, the ships will have visited ports in South America and the West Indies during the 2 months training cruise.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 1, 1954 – “Benny D. BRASEL, Radarman second class, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. B.G. BRASEL, Kinmundy, and husband of the former Miss Betty L. MITCHELL of Farina, is serving aboard the light aircraft carrier, USS Saipan here.  The Saipan is participating in exercise “Flag Hoist” conducted at Iwo Jima during the latter part of March.  She is supplying close air support to amphibious units of the Pacific Fleet during the simulated attack on the strategic island.  The Saipan is on a tour of duty in the far east with UN forces and is attached to the Blockading and Escort Task Force 95.” 

 

 “The Kinmundy Express” – July 15, 1954 – “Benny D. BRASEL to return to States: The USS Saipan is scheduled to return here July 20th completing a round the world cruise and a tour of duty off Korea.  Serving aboard the light aircraft carrier is Benny D. BRASEL, radarman, second class, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. B.G. BRASEL of Kinmundy, and husband of Mrs. Betty L. BRASEL of Effingham.” (A list of all of the places that this ship had been was included.) 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 7, 1957 – “Benny Dean BRASEL, Rt. 1 Kinmundy reenlisted in the U.S. Navy for 4 years, Oct. 30, 1957.  He will be transferred to Washington, D.C. for further transfer.  He was enlisted as a Radarman 3rd class.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 20, 1961 - “Benny D. BRASEL, radarman second class, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. B.G. Brasel of Rt. 1 Kinmundy, is serving aboard the attack aircraft carrier USS Franklin D. Roosevelt operating with the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean.  The Roosevelt is scheduled to visit several Mediterranean countries during the 7 month cruise, and conduct training exercises to maintain its high level of readiness and efficiency.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 11, 1965 –“Word has been received that Benny D. BRASEL, son of Mr. and Mrs. B.G. Brasel has been promoted from R.D.1 to R.D.C.A., Chief Radarman U.S.N., effective Jan. 16th.  Chief Petty Officer is the highest enlisted rank in the Navy.  He has had 14 years service, including Atlantic and Pacific Fleet Aircraft carriers, submarines and command ships, and various naval schools.  He also is a Korean and Indo-China veteran.  His last station was the Command Ship, U.S.S. Greenwich Bay out of Norfolk, Va.  He is now attached to the Recruit Training Command, U.S.N.T.C., Great Lakes.  His promotion was the result of a Fleet wide competitive examination.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 27, 1968 – “Benny BRASEL, son of Mr. and Mrs. B.G. Brasel, Kinmundy, has been promoted, effective June 1st, to Warrant Officer, Operations Technician, U.S. Navy, from his enlisted rate of Chief Radarman.  He has been assigned for the past 3½ years as Company Commander and as Special Services Division Officer at Recruit Training Command, N.T.C., Great Lakes and is presently assigned as a Battalion Commander at Recruit Training Command while awaiting further orders.”

 


(V-410) Dale W. Brasel (served in the Navy during World War II in the Pacific Theater)

 


 

Denton G. Brasel

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 25, 1955 – “T S Denton BRASEL arrived here Friday with all of his belongings to visit a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Glen BRASEL, before leaving for Greenland where he will be stationed for the next year.  He sent his wife and children back to her native country, Costa Rica, where she will remain during his absence.  She will teach school there this year.” 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 13, 1959 – “T. Sgt. Denton BRASEL and daughters, Rosemary and Millie, of Stead Air Base, Nev., arrived Monday for a short visit with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Glen BRASEL and other relatives.  Denton will leave soon for Camp Perry, Ohio, where he will still be shooting with the Air Force Training Command Rifle Team.  His daughters will remain here until his return.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 31, 1959 – “Mr. and Mrs. Glen BRASEL are in receipt of a clipping from the “Flight Times” published at Sparks, Nevada, giving the picture of their son, T. Sgt. Denton G. BRASEL being awarded the bronze USAF Excellence in Competition badge for his aptitude with a 45 cal. pistol.  The award was for his record in the 1959 ATC pistol match.  Sgt. BRASEL is stationed at Stead Air Force Base near Reno, Nevada.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 17, 1951 – “Cpl. and Mrs. Denton BRASEL left Monday for Florida where they will make their home.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 4, 1968 – “The U.S. Air Force has announced the coming retirement of Master Sergeant Denton G. BRASEL, son of Mr. and Mrs. Glen B. Brasel of Kinmundy.  Sergeant Brasel, who is scheduled to retire in September after more than 20 years service, is an instructor at the USAF Marksmanship School at Lackland AFB, Tex.  He is a member of the Air Training Command.  A graduate of Kinmundy High School, the sergeant attended the Univ. of Illinois.  His wife is the former Nelly Suarez from Central America.  Mr. and Mrs. Brasel and 5 children spent last week here with their parents.  They were enroute to Reno, Nevada, where Mr. Brasel will enter the University and complete his education.  Mrs. Brasel is a school teacher by profession and will teach in Reno.  The eldest daughter will also enter the university.”

 


 

Harry Brasel

 “The Kinmundy Express” – June 21, 1956 – “Harry BRASEL, CT2, arrived home Monday for a 30 day leave after spending the past 2 years in Japan.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 12, 1956 – “CT 2 Harry BRASEL, son of Mr. and Mrs. Burdette BRASEL, and Miss Alice FRIMEL, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Al FRIMEL, of Odin, were married at the Baptist parsonage in Centralia on July 8, Rev. Forrest WEEMS officiating.  The attendants were Mr. and Mrs. Bud DYER of Odin.  CT 2 BRASEL was a graduate of the K.C.H.S. in 1950, and Mrs. BRASEL from the Odin H.S. in 1952.  He will return to his duties July 15.  Mrs. BRASEL will continue to work as bookkeeper at Montgomery Ward in Centralia.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 20, 1956 – “CT 2 Harry BRASEL spent the past week with Mr. and Mrs. Burdette BRASEL and other relatives.  He left Monday evening to report back for duty at Chettenham, Md.  He was accompanied by his wife.”

 


 

John J. Brasel

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – July 4, 1918;

 Camp Sherman, Chillicothe, Ohio; June 23

      Dear Folks at Home,

            I received your letter Saturday night at 9 o’clock.  Just got back from a hike at that time , although was not tired as we rode in trucks.  The distance was 18 miles east of Chillicothe out in some of the worst hills I ever saw.  The place we were camped at was at an old Artillery Range.  We had 2 bigguns while out there.  Nothing killed but snakes and rattlers at that.  A fellow killed one with 11 rattles.  I killed one with 6 rattles, a black diamond too.

            I have been promoted to a signalman and am going to school all the time.  We have all kinds of signals, hand flags, flash light, wigwag, telegraph, telephone, wireless and a ton more and I am trying to learn all of them.  We also had two aeroplanes with us.  They were up all day, going back and forth over us and signaling to us and we would answer by wireless.

            Say, did you ever see a wireless station?  Well I have put them up.  The kind we use can be put up in ten minutes and we sure can hear that station in New York and Arlington, I think it is very plain.  I have not tried the wireless yet, don’t know the code well enough to receive.

            Well, how are you folks at home?  I am all right.  I do not have to drill near as hard as I did.  Only get one hour of Infantry drill each day now and less than that some days.

            I am going to try for a pass to come home about the Fourth, but am afraid I will not get it.  One can never tell what he will get in the Army.  The P.B.I. (Poor Bloody Infantry) is getting it good and hard these days and all of us for that matter.  We don’t get any more holidays except Sunday and then we are sometimes on a hike.  We began to wear gas masks last Monday one hour each day.  Talk about torture, I do not believe there could be any worse.  It does not make any difference what we are doing if a soldier in Camp Sherman – we must wear our gas mask one hour each day.  It looks funny to see cooks and kitchen police wearing their masks at work but let me tell you it don’t feel funny.  The officers wear them just the same as we privates.

            Am at the Y – must close – don’t look for me as it is hard to get off.

            P.S. Say Ma.  I don’t suppose you thought when you was a girl in Ohio that your son would go over the same ground as a soldier.  But one never can tell.  I never thought of it before myself until it really happened, but mother, you can be assured that I will not dishonor the old stomping grounds of your girlhood.   Well Dad, how are you?  I hope all right.  Don’t worry about me.  Just think of the thousands of other fathers that have two, three, and four boys in the service.  And I think if a fellow is of the right kind of stuff he will learn something –how to appreciate a home for Camp is a long way from home.

            There are thousands of boys at this minute wishing for home.  But we have a duty to perform and we are going to do it, with all the man we have in us.

                     John J. BRASEL; Co. I  335 Infantry

 


 

 

(V-144) Neal Brasel

 

 “The Kinmundy Express” – July 14, 1955 – “RMSM Neil BRASEL, who has been stationed in Bainbridge, Md., arrived home Saturday for a 10 day leave before reporting to USS Hyman in New Port, R.I., where he will attend radio school.” 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 22, 1955 – “Neil BRASEL, R.M. left Saturday for his ship in Newport, R.I. after spending a 30 day furlough leave here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Burdette BRASEL and wife, Wanda.” 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Apr 26, 1956 – “The Navy Department announced the promotion on Apr. 16 of N.R. BRASEL, son of Mr. and Mrs. B.G. BRASEL of Kinmundy, to radioman, third class, USN, while serving aboard the destroyer USS Hyman with the Atlantic Fleet.”

 

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 11, 1956 – “RM3 and Mrs. Neil BRASEL of Newport, R.I. came last Wednesday for a few days leave and visited their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bert GARRETT and Mr. and Mrs. Burdette BRASEL, Neil returned aboard ship Tuesday, while Mrs. BRASEL remained here.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 11, 1958 – “R2c and Mrs. Neil BRASEL and sons, of Corpus Christi, Texas came Saturday to spend their vacation with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Burdette BRASEL and Mr. and Mrs. Bert GARRETT.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 20, 1968 – “EM-1 and Mrs. Neil BRASEL and family, Miami, Fla., returned Miss Betty Brasel, who had been visiting with them for a week.  They arrived here Friday night.  Neil is a member of the Coast Guard and is enroute to Guam, and will leave his family here for some time.  Neil had his car, a 1966 Chevelle, parked in the yard of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Burdette Brasel and on Saturday night, it was stolen.  After reporting it to the sheriff, it was reported found by the state police in the rest area south of Alma.  The back seat had been slashed, the hub caps strewn about the area, and a part of the engine missing.  An attaché case containing sealed orders as well as traveling instructions, had been broken into but none of the papers were missing.  Neil will leave this week end for San Francisco and then to Guam.”

 

 


(V-411) Rich Brasel

 


 

 

(V-235b) Cecil Brim

 

"The Kinmundy Express - Jan. 6, 1944 - "Here’s a V-Mail from PFC Cecil BRIM, who is now in Italy. It sure gives us great pleasure in knowing that this paper is getting to the boys in these remote places. His letter was written Dec. 20th. Here is what he says: I have received the Kinmundy Express in England, Africa, Sicily, and now in Italy, and it is the only way that I learn the news that is happening around home. I received 3 of them today and read the letters from the boys and girls in the service and I sure like to read things like that. The Zatso is what interests me the most, why don’t you tell the g.m. to do her own housework and then you go join the army before she declares war on you. Give my regards to all the folks back at Kinmundy. I still remember them for I was one of the first 3 to leave there and have never been back."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 18, 1945 – “PFC Cecil BRIM arrived here Oct. 9th to spend sometime with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James BRIM and family.  He was discharged from Camp McCoy, Wis., the day previous.  Cecil entered the service Feb. 11, 1941, and shipped overseas Aug. 18, 1942, landing in England.  From there he went to Africa, then to Sicily, Italy, France and Austria.  He landed back to the states at New York, on Sept. 30th.  He wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Pre-Pearl Harbor Ribbon and the European Theater of Operations Ribbon with 4 stars, representing the campaigns of Africa, Sicily, Naples and Rome-Arno.  Cecil hasn’t said just hat he intends to do now except get caught up on his loafing and sleeping.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 21, 1956 – “Army Sgt. Cecil A. BRIM, son of Mr. and Mrs. James A. BRIM, Kinmundy, recently was graduated from the Non-Commissioned Officer Academy at Fort Riley, Kansas.  BRIM, a section leader in the 1st Infantry Division’s 1st Quartermaster Co., entered the Army in 1941.  Sgt. BRIM’s wife, Jeanne, lives in Junction City, Kan.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 31, 1962 - “Army Specialist 5 Cecil A. BRIM, son of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Brim, Kinmundy, recently participated in Grand Salem I, a 5 day Central Army Group exercise in Germany.  Specialist Brim, a light-truck driver in the 29th Transportation Battallion’s 547th Co. in Boblingen, Germany, entered the army in 1941 and arrived overseas on this tour of duty in July 1960.  His wife, Jenne, is with him in Germany.”

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

(V-236b) Charles Brim

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 25, 1945 – “ PFC Charles BRIM, son of Mr. and Mrs. James BRIM, arrived home Oct. 16th after receiving his discharge from the army at Camp Grant the day previous.  Charles entered the service Jan. 30, 1943, and shipped overseas Dec. 25, 1943, landing in Scotland.  From there he went to France then to Belgium, Holland, and Germany.  He started back to the states Sept. 25, landing at New Port News Oct. 3rd.  Charles was with the 573rd Signal Warning Battalion.  He wears the Good Conduct Medal, the European Theater of Operations Ribbon with 3 stars representing the battles of Northern France, Rhineland and Central Germany, and the Belgium Fourragere.  Charles says he doesn’t exactly know what he will do in the future, but for the present, he will just loaf.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

  

(V-118)                                       Garland Brimberry                                          (V-119)

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 10, 1954 – “Pfc. Garland R. BRIMBERRY, whose wife, Edna, and parents, live east of Kinmundy, recently arrived in Korea for duty with the 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class BRIMBERRY, a medical aidman, entered the Army in March 1953 and completed basic training at Camp Stewart, Ga.” 

 


 

(V-36) Joseph Brimberry (1841-1927) , son of John and Margaret Higgins Brimberry

 


 

 

(V-237b) Joe A. Brimberry

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 25, 1945 – “PFC Joe A. BRIMBERRY Awarded Combat Decoration for Heroic Fighting in Italy: With the Fifth Army Italy - PFC Joe A. BRIMBERRY, husband of Mrs. Minnie A. BRIMBERRY, Kinmundy, has been cited by the 88th Mountain Regiment of the 10th “Mountaineer” Division and awarded the Combat Infantryman Badge for actual participation in combat against the enemy of the Fifth Army front in Italy.  Standards for the badge are high.  The decoration is award to the infantry soldier who has proved his fighting ability in combat.  The handsome badge consists of silver rifle set against a background of infantry blue, enclosed in a silver wreath.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 6, 1945 – “Pvt. Joe A. BRIMBERRY arrived here Sunday morning to spend a 30 day furlough with his wife and children and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur BRIMBERRY.  Joe entered the Army May 15, 1944, landing at Naples, Italy on Dec. 23.  He remained in Italy during his sojourn abroad.  He started homeward Aug. 18, and landed in New York Aug. 29.  Pvt. BRIMBERRY wears the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, and the Mediterranean Theater of Operations Ribbon with 2 stars, representing the Battles of the Appinines and Po Valley.  After his furlough has expired, he will be sent to Camp Polk, La.  Pvt. and Mrs. BRIMBERRY have 2 children, Mary 5, and Everett, 4.”

              

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 13, 1945 – “Pvt. Joe A. BRIMBERRY, who arrived home from Italy Sept. 2, to spend a 30 day furlough with his family.”

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

(V-111) Leroy Brimberry

 


 

   

 

                          (V-37) Marion Earl "Buddy" Brimberry on main street in Kinmundy - 1943  & with Japanese flag   (V-38)

 

Marion Earl "Buddy" Brimberry

"The Kinmundy Express - Sept. 7, 1944 - "Here’s one from Cpl. Earl BRIMBERRY, who is in the Southwest Pacific Theater and from the tone of his letter, is seeing plenty of action. He says: We have been in combat for about 2 months now and haven’t had much time to do much of anything. This was our first time to meet the Japs and it was very exciting at times and not very funny at others. I am a radio operator and the only way we could get communications to our forward observers was by putting a radio in the top of a tree which was about 150 feet high and man it 24 hours. At night when the wind blew, it swayed as if it was on a pair of sky hooks. We could see far out into the jungle and at night the tracers would fly like big lightning bugs. In the front lines it is not quite so pleasant. The main thing is that the nights are too dark and too long. Of course, the Japs like to do their damage at those times too, when you can’t see an inch in front of you eyes. Well, if you have ever seen a million black cats on a dark night you will have some idea as to what I mean, and you get scared too, but everyone is scared so nobody is ashamed of it, but scared or not, we have killed plenty of Japs and now they have quit and are headed into the hills either to starve or hook in with the natives. The natives are funny here. They will work for us awhile then go across and work for the Japs, but they are valuable to lead patrols, carry ammo and wounded out of the jungle. They have saved a lot of fellows lives. I had the good fortune of spending a few hours with John McCULLEY and Harold JONES before I came up here and just missed Floyd EAGAN by the skin of my teeth. We chewed the fat for quite a spell. I haven’t received the paper for a long time now, but I guess I’ll get a whole sack full some of these days when things like that get a chance to come up. I was very sorry to hear of Junior HINKLEY’s death I just missed seeing him by a few days before they left. Matter of fact, we were supposed to go on the same task force, but was taken off at the last minute for reasons I can’t discuss. I hope everyone at home are swell. I can assure you that I am in the pink a far as health is concerned and I hope to be home by next Christmas. These Japs are not human though, and our most severe battles are yet to come. It is going to be very costly, but we can do it. I saw Bob HOPE, Frances LANGFORD, Jerry CALONA, and a couple more yesterday after sitting in the sun for 6 hours. Their plane was late. So long."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 31, 1945 – “Here’s a short letter from Cpl. Earl BRIMBERRY, dated 11 May in the Philippines.  He says: Just a line or two to say hello and to let you know of the change of APO.  I’ve had quite a few new ones lately, but now I think we’re settled for quite awhile at least and I hope so.  Our job here in the Philippines is just about done and I hope to be home this year with Germany done for.  I got down to Manila while we were in those parts, but was so badly torn up you could not see it’s real beauty.  Although it was a very beautiful city at one time and I can’t blame the Filipinos and bragging about it so much.  I saw JONES the other day for a few moments.  What a surprise.  Haven’t seen a paper for many a moon, but I will some day.  Say hello to everyone and hold the fort down.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 31, 1946 –“Sgt. Earl BRIMBERRY, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur BRIMBERRY, received his discharge at Jefferson Barracks, Jan. 21, and arrived home the same day.  Sgt. BRIMBERRY entered the service Dec. 2, 1942, and shipped overseas Oct. 27, landing in Australia.  From there he went to Good Nough Island, then to New Guinea, Philippines, Okinaw and then to Japan.  He started home from Japan on Nov. 15, landing at Tacoma, Wash., Dec. 27.  He was held there for 10 days awaiting transportation and after arriving at Jefferson Barracks, spent another 10 days in the hospital with malaria.  Sgt. BRIMBERRY wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon, the Philippine Liberation Ribbon with 2 stars representing the campaigns of the Southern Philippines and Okinaw, and the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with 3 stars representing the campaigns of Southern New Guinea, British New Guinea and Luzon.  After resting a bit, Earl intends to enter a trade school in St. Louis.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 16, 1949 – “Sgt. Marion E. BRIMBERRY Now on Isle of Guam: Sergeant Marion E. BRIMBERRY is now serving with the United States Air Force on Guam.  Assigned to the 4th Rescue Squadron at North Guam Air Force Base, as a radio operator, Sergeant BRIMBERRY participates in search and rescue missions performed by the squadron.  Sergeant BRIMBERRY, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur BRIMBERRY of Kinmundy, graduated from Kinmundy H.S. in 1941.  He entered the service in 1942, and served in Australia, New Guinea, the Phillipines, and Okinawa.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 21, 1950 – “Staff Sergeant Marion E. BRIMBERRY graduated this week from the Air Force Communications School at Scott Air Force Base.  He will serve in the maintenance of the Air Force’s vast network of radio hookups.  S.Sgt. BRIMBERRY, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur BRIMBERRY, Kinmundy, served in the Asiatic Pacific Theater of Operations during and following WWII.  He was awarded 4 bronze stars for his theater ribbon, one Arrowhead, two stars for the Philippine Liberation Ribbon, a Presidential Unit Citation and other decorations.  His nephew, Cpl. Bennie GRAY, is also a student at Scott Field Air Force Base.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 28, 1950 – “S. Sgt. Marion E. BRIMBERRY of Eglin Field, Fla. is spending the holidays here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Art BRIMBERRY.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 23, 1967 – “Chief Master Sergeant Marion E. BRIMBERRY, son of Mrs. Daisy R. Brimberry of Alma, is a member of the 5th Tactical Control Group at Clark AB that has received the coveted U.S. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award.  Sergeant Brimberry, a communications superintendent will wear a distinctive ribbon decoration to identify his affiliation with the Pacific Air Forces organization.  His group was cited for its execution of 17 major deployments and six operations in support of combat exercises, and for improvement of tactical air control systems used throughout the Air Force.  The 5th was also recognized for providing either technical or manning assistance at almost every major location in Southeast Asia.  The sergeant served in the Pacific Theater of Operations during World War II and participated in the Dominican Republic Crisis.  He is a graduate of Kinmundy High School.  Sergeant Brimberry’s wife, Lillian, is the daughter of Mrs. Leota Harris of Alma.”

 


 

(V-99) Walter Brimberry

 


 

   

(V-145) Jack Brinkley  

 


 

(V-146) Jack Brinkley 

 


 

(V-238b) Dale Broom

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - July 20, 1944 - "Here’s a dandy letter written June 28th from S. Sgt. Dale R. BROOM, who is sojourning in China for the present. He says: I have written to you before, but I guess you didn’t receive the letter. I get the Kinmundy Express quite often. Yesterday, I received some March and April issues. I enjoy reading the letters you print in the paper from boys in the Service, also the Zatso column. The letter that James ELLIS wrote to you was interesting. I would write to him if I knew his address. I haven’t run on to any of the boys from around home over here, as yet, although I know there are some boys from around home in India, maybe some in China that I don’t know about. I hear there is a JASPER boy here in China, but I don’t know his address and haven’t seen him yet. I have been overseas since January 1942. I spent 18 months in India and have been in China for the past 10 months. The Monsoon season is on now (rainy season). It doesn’t get as hot here during the rainy season as it did in the jungle where I spent the Monsoon season last year (in the part of China I am in.) There are places in China where it gets plenty hot during summer months. I went to a Rest Camp about a month ago. It is a nice place situated up in the mountains on the banks of a lake. The lake is supplied with water by a spring at the bottom. They have facilities for swimming, boating, and fishing. The water is almost crystal clear. The G.I.’s don’t have much luck catching fish but the Chinese have pretty good luck catching them. The best thing about a rest camp was the good chow. They have all G. I. rations there, while at camps we’ve all ate Chinese rations there, get some fresh fruit and vegetables this time of year, such as tomatoes, beans, and peaches. The peaches are awfully small and don’t have much taste but still they taste like peaches. Boy! How I would like to bite into a Southern Illinois peach right now or some of those Yellow Transparent apples that are ripe about now. We have 3 shows (movies) per week here, most of them are pretty good show. We get most of the popular magazines such as Life, Esquire, Look and Saturday Evening Post and others which are supplied by Special Services. I hope you received that CBI Roundup that I sent you about 2 weeks ago. I hope the Rotation Policy get to working over here soon. I guess we have it easy here compared to some of the other theaters of operation. I will close by saying thanks for sending the paper. It has world wide circulation going the boys wherever they are stationed. In closing I would like to say ‘hello’ to the other boys in the service and the hometown folks around Kinmundy and Alma. I noticed you received a letter from James HAMMER, who is in the Navy. I have wondered if he was still O.K. I saw him in Australia in Feb. 1942. He accompanied us on a war ship."

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Dec. 28, 1944 - "S. Sgt. Dale R. BROOM, son of Mr. and Mrs. John A. BROOM, is leaving today after spending a 28 day furlough at home. He served 34 months overseas, serving in the C.B.I. Theater (China, Burma India). S. Sgt. BROOM was a ground crew member in a Fighter Squadron in General Chenaults’ 14th Air Force, and has 2 Bronze Stars to his Asiatic Pacific Theater Ribbon. After his furlough, he will report to his new assignment station at Santa Ana, Air Base in Santa Ana, Calif., where he will be reassigned to an outfit somewhere in the United States. He has 3 brothers in the Service: John, who was recently promoted to Lt. Col., who is in the Air Force in Italy, and Charles, who is a Lt. in the Navy at Baltimore, Md., and Ernest, an ensign in the navy on sea duty in the Pacific.

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 19, 1945 – “S. Sgt. Dale R. BROOM, son of Mr. and Mrs. John A. BROOM, was honorably discharged from the army at the Separation Center at Ft. Douglas, Utah, on July 9.  Sgt. BROOM was discharged on the point system, having 105 points.  Sgt. BROOM enlisted in the Air Corps at Chanute Field, Ill. on Sept. 20, 1940, and shipped overseas with the Fighter Squadron on Jan. 12, 1942, spending about 15 days in Australia, then continuing to India, serving 24 months overseas in China, Burma, and India.  Sgt. BROOM arrived back in the States on Nov. 22, 1944.  He was granted a 30 day furlough, which was spent with his parents, after which he was assigned to an air base at Kearns, Utah.  He remained there until receiving his discharge.  He is enlisted to wear the Good Conduct Medal, the American Defense Ribbon, and the Asiatic-Pacific Theater Ribbon with 3 bronze stars.  Sgt. BROOM has 3 other brothers still in the service: Charles, who is a Lt. in the Navy, stationed at Baltimore, Md.; John, a Lt. Col., who is Commanding Officer of an Air Base near Florence, Italy; and Ernest, an Ensign in the Navy, on sea duty in the Central Pacific. - “Gosh, it seems good to get back in civilian clothes again.”

 


 

 (V-239b) John A. Broom

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Feb. 10, 1944 - "Here’s another dandy letter from Major John A. BROOM, Jr. who has moved from North Africa into Italy. Just as a souvenir, he sent us a piece of Italian money, which he says is worth 1 cent in our money. Here is what he says: Since writing to you last time many things have taken place. I’ve spent 4 weeks in a Northern African Army Hospital with jaundice, moved to my new address "Somewhere in Italy" changed assignments, and have met new and interesting people. My last letter told you something about the Army Medical Service over here and at that time I had no idea of becoming a patient of such an institution so soon. My first few days in the hospital were some what uncomfortable - no appetite whatsoever; being stuck in the arms and fingers every so often for blood samples; no taste for cigarettes or my pipe; taking an unnecessary amount of foul tasting medicines; listening to the other patients talk about the swell food they were having in the dining hall (I was on a soft diet and couldn’t bear the sight of it); taking an afternoon nap then being forced to go to sleep at 9 o’clock in the evening. After the first week, however, I regained my appetite and was permitted to eat in the officer’s mess. I was hungry all the time. Immediately I started gaining weight. While "resting" in the hospital, and that’s a true story, I learned to play chess - my first exposure to that game which before I had considered ‘sissy’ and played only by wealthy old men - but with hours to wile away we thought nothing of spending 2 or 3 hours on one game. No, none of us were particularly good. I lost my knights and queen with disgusting regularity, though I did manage to defeat the Ward Champion, an English Lieutenant, one time. In addition to playing chess all of the patients spent a great deal of time reading books and magazines furnished by the American Red Cross. We had recent issues of Time, Newsweek, Life, Collier’s Saturday Evening Post, and others. Such books as "Oliver Wiswell", "30 Seconds Over Toyko", "So little time", "Assignment in Brittany, mystery novels and many others were available to us. Right here I would like to say a good word for the American Red Cross. They are doing a most commendable job over here in operating enlisted men’s clubs, Red Cross Officer’s Clubs and other important services. Many times the only decent place for a man to go for a snack, to write letters, or just plain loafing, is the Red Cross Club. At these clubs they have good eats, recreation rooms, writing rooms and lounge rooms. Field service units make rounds to various organizations serving hot coffee and doughnuts. So far in my experience overseas I have heard criticism only a very few times of the Red Cross, but most always one can hear words of praise for their work. This old world is a small place and seems to get smaller and smaller every day. It seems to me the farther I get away from home the more people I meet who are from parts of the country known to me or are former acquaintances or friends. As you probably know, I lived in Columbia, S.C. for sometime and probably know more people intimately there than in any other part of the States. About 2 months ago, I saw a little negro boy (small man I should say) in Navy fatigue uniform. On his left rear pocket he had the name "Dreher" stenciled in white letters. While living in Columbia, I knew several families by the name of "Dreher". I approached this fellow and said "Boy, where are you from?" (The conversation went something like this.) "Ise frum South Carolina, suh". "From Columbia?", I asked. "No suh, not xactly. Ise frum what dey calls West Columbia." "What part of West Columbia?" "Ise frum what dey calls Sugahtown, suh", he drawled. "Oh yes, right over there in the lane by Cayse school?" I asked. "Yassuh." "Does your Dad work at the brickyard (Guignard Brick Works)?" "Yassuh." "Do you know Mr. ALBERT and Mr. George HOUGH?" "Y-a-s S-U-H. Suh, is you all frum Columbia?" he questioned. "Yes, I am from Columbia and I know your old man", replied. When I started to leave him he extended his hand in real friendship and says, "Majuh, Suh, I hopes we meet again soon, and I hopes dats in Columbia." He then saluted and walked away. I am telling you this because this is a typical conversation between 2 fellows overseas, regardless of color. If they know someone mutually, or are familiar with the same part of the country. It’s really and truly a grand reunion. My Illinois acquaintances don’t seem to show up over here, as I haven’t seen a soul from near Marion county except my former Executive Officer, Michael J. KING, who was formerly in the oil business during the oil boom. (He’s from Mt. Vernon.) Censorship regulations prevent me from writing anything in detail about this country, perhaps I’ll be able to do so at a later date. Afterall there is a war being fought over here. I’m sure I can say a few things about it, however. Geographically it is a beautiful country, with mountains (some snowcapped), vegetable gardens, citrus fruits, apples, etc. The general means of transportation for the natives are mule, burro, horse, oxen, or human drawn 2-wheeled carts. There are some enormous cats with wheels about 6 or 8 feet in diameter. These carts are not what we would call factory made, but are hewn by hand from raw timber in shops such as a blacksmith shop in the States. Driving a vehicle on the highways is a most difficult task due to the fact that there are so many of these carts on the road. In addition to this hazard there are always many people walking on the roads. Have you ever been down South and seen a negro carrying a watermelon on his head? I’ve seen that many times and have always marveled at the balance they had, but I think these Italian people have them beat on that score. They carry tremendous loads on their heads, and much of the time the bearer may be barefooted, at the best have a pair of wooden sole shoes with a strap over the top - much the same as a shower shoe. Really, I’ve seen children and some grownups as well walking in cold mud or water on the streets or highways barefooted when the temperature was below freezing. It’s pitiful, especially to see poor innocent children going through such privation. We, of the good old United States, do not know or realize what it means to be poor, nor do we know what it means to have a real war come to our country to tear down our home and our places of business. We can be so thankful and deeply grateful for this. The end of this war will mean much to every civilized person in the world, so we must end it soon. We want to get home to our families, and, no doubt, the people of the invaded countries want to settle down to business again. I’d better leave such talk to the News Correspondents, don’t you think? I received the carton of cigarettes from the Chamber of Commerce and want to thank them for the remembrance. Also, to all the people who have so kindly and thoughtfully remembered me with greetings, I wish to thank them. Your thoughts of us, your prayers for our safe return are always requested and graciously received. S’long until next time."

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Nov. 23, 1944 - "Here’s a short note, a V-Mail from Major J.A. BROOM, Jr., who is somewhere in Italy. He signed this letter, "Johnny BROOM, sometimes known as Whisk". We have often wondered if everything was so straight-laced in the army after the boys reached the other side. But from this remark we take it, they might have a little fun calling one another nicknames. Here is what he says: This morning I am wondering what it would be like to be a civilian! Four years ago this morning I reported for 1 year of active duty with the Air Corps - that’s a long year, don’t you think? This 4 years of duty has been interesting. There have been interesting people, interesting places, and interesting experiences. 18½ months and overseas - riding on ships, seeing interesting places such as Casa Blanca, Oran, Algiers, Tunis, Bizerte, Naples, Foggia, Rome, Touloran, Marseilles, Cannes, Nice, Florence, Casino, Anzio, and other places too numerous to mention. I’ve known and been under the commands of such officers as Lt. General BREHERTON, General WILLIAMS and others. I’ve ridden jeeps, bicycles, GMC 6 x 6s and 40 and 8s. I’ve flown in PT-18s, PT-14s, B-18s, B-25s, C-47s, Cubs, and A-18s. So, as you might assume, I’m like the fellow in Arkansas in the filling station business "The only reason I’m carrying on is to see what the H___ is going to happen next". Best regards to all."

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Dec. 21, 1944 - "We have received many Christmas greetings from the boys but there is a personal one for Lt. Col. John A. BROOM, Jr., who is still somewhere in Italy. He says: As Christmas draws nearer, my thoughts are more than ever with the folks at home. I’m not feeling sorry for myself but so sincerely regret having to be away for another holiday season. Dale, my brother, who has spent almost 3 years in CBI theater, is fortunate in getting home at the time, but he certainly deserves it and I am glad for him. We have so much for which to be thankful for - life, health, and the privilege of serving our country in one way or another, and at this time of year it would benefit all of us to say a few extra prayers for our days to come. My Christmas wish to you is "Merry, Merry Christmas and may you enjoy 365 happy, prosperous, and successful days in 1945. May you continue undaunted in your chosen profession and write many more "Zatso" columns. Our wish to all would add "May we be remembered in your prayers for our safety and eventual safe return home." "Home Alive in ‘45!"

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 23, 1945 – “With the 12th Air Force in Italy, Lt. Col. John A. BROOM, Jr., Decatur, Ill., son of Mr. and Mrs. John A. BROOM, Sr. of Alma, Ill., is now on duty as Executive Officer with the 332nd Air Service Group a unit of the Twelfth Air Force, servicing Air Corps personnel in the vicinity of Florence, Italy.  Colonel BROOM has gained an enviable reputation with the 12th Air Force servicing allied war planes throughout the Mediterrian campaign, and servicing Air Corps personnel in the Florence area.  During his 27 months overseas, he has been awarded 5 bronze stars for services rendered in Naples Foggia, Rome-Arne, Southern France, North Appenines and German Campaigns.  He also wears the American Theater Ribbon.  He is a graduate of the University of Ill. and was a member of the following fraternities: The Pharnax, Alpha Tau Sigma, and Pershing Rifles, graduating with the class of 1932.  Col. BROOM’s wife, Mrs. Wilma H. BROOM, and 2 children, John A. BROOM, III, and Robert Dale BROOM, are now residing in Decatur, Ill.  Col. BROOM was commissioned a 2nd Lieut. in the Infantry Reserves, 8 Sept. 1932, and entered active duty with the Air Corps on 10 Nov. 1940, being promoted to Lt. Colonel on 17 Nov. 1944.  Prior to his military service, he was associated with the Fruehauf Trailer Co., Detroit, Mich., in the sales dept.  Colonel has 2 brothers now serving in the Armed Forces, Lt. Charles M. BROOM, United States Naval Reserve, Baltimore Shipyards, Baltimore, Md.; Ensign Ernest V. BROOM, U.S. Naval Reserve, now serving with a sub-chaser somewhere in the Southwest Pacific; S. Sgt. Dale R. BROOM, was recently discharged after serving with the Air Corps in the India-Burma Theater.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 22, 1945 – “Lt. Col. John A. BROOM, Jr., paid our office a visit this past week and stated that he was enjoying a 45 day leave with his wife and 2 sons, Johnny Roy, 5, and Bobbie, 3, who have been making their home in Decatur with her parents, and with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John A. BROOM, Sr., of Alma.  Col. BROOM received his commission in the reserve army as a 2nd Lieut., Sept. 8, 1932, following his graduation from the University of Illinois the June previous.  He was promoted to 1st Lieut. Feb. 16, 1936; Captain, May 29, 1941; Major Oct. 10, 1942; Lieut. Colonel, Nov. 17, 1944.  His first commissions were in the Infantry but he later transferred to the Air Corps.  Col. BROOM was called to active duty Nov. 10, 1940, and shipped overseas in 1942, landing in Algeria and was stationed in Oran and Constantine later going into Tunisia where he was stationed in Bizerte.  From there he went to Italy and was stationed in Naples, Grossetto, Pisa, and Florence.  His next move was into Southern France where he was stationed near Marseilles.  He was Service Group Executive Officer for the 12th Air Force.  Col. BROOM wears the American Theater Ribbon and the African Middle Eastern Theater Ribbon with 5 stars, representing the Naples Foggia Campaign, the Rome-Arno Campaign, Southern France, Rhineland, and North Apennines.  Col. BROOM will report to Greenboro, N.C. on Dec. 2 for re-assignment.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 3, 1952 – “Word has been received here by Mr. and Mrs. J.A. BROOM that their son, Lt. Col. John A. BROOM Jr. has arrived in England. Col. BROOM was recalled to military service last year, and was troop commander aboard ship. His wife and two sons of Columbia, S.C. will visit here with the BROOMS this month and will join him in England in August.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Wilbur Broom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - March 8, 1945 - Pvt. Wilbur BROOM, husband of Mrs. Jessie BROOM, of Gary, Ind. has been missing in action in Luxembourg since Dec. 20, 1944, according to a war dept. telegram received last week. A member of the 110th Infantry which was one of the hardest hit units during the German drive into Belgium. He entered the service in Oct. 1943 and was originally placed in a railroad battalion transferring later to the infantry unit.

 

May 17, 1945 - Pvt. Wilbur BROOM Killed in Action: Pvt. Wilbur Arthur, son of the late William and Thelia Belle CROWN BROOM, was born in Alma, Ill. on Feb. 9, 1914 and was killed in action in Luxembourg, Dec. 20, 1944. He grew to manhood in Alma and on Nov. 6, 1937, married Miss Jessie DODSON, of this city. Soon after their marriage, they went to Gary, Ind., where he had employment. He entered the armed services on Oct. 13, 1943. He was shipped overseas in Aug. 1944, landing in England. From there he was taken into France, Belgium, Germany, and Luxembourg. A telegram received by the widow on Jan. 19th, stated that he was "Missing in Action 20 December". No more word was received until on April 5th when she received another telegram from the War Dept. stating that he was "Killed in Action, 20 December." Besides his wife and mother, he leaves 2 sisters, Mrs. Carrie BROOM, Alma, and Mrs. Lavina SHUFELDT, Iuka, and 4 brothers, Roy, St. James, Ill.; Paul, Chester, Ill., Frederick, Missouri, and Riley, Gary, Ind. The widow, Mrs. Jessie BROOM, has been visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. DODSON, in this city, for the past 2 weeks. Memorial services will be held sometime in the near future.

 

(V-240b) - Wilbur Broom

 

 

 

 

 

(V-305) - Wilbur Broom

 

Aug. 26, 1948 - Funeral Rites Held Sunday Afternoon for Pvt. Wilbur BROOM: Funeral services were conducted Sunday afternoon from the Alma Methodist Church for the casketed remains of Pvt. Wilbur BROOM, Rev. HAYES, officiating, assisted by Rev. CURTIS.  Interment was made in the Alma Cemetery under the auspices of Kinmundy Post, No. 519, American Legion.  Again we are reminded of the price we pay to enjoy the privileges and blessings of living in our beloved land.  More than a century ago, our forefathers pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor to secure for us these God given blessings.  And in the intervening years when dangers have threatened our peace and security, the strong men of our land have risen in their might and driven from our midst the forces that would destroy our freedom.  But always a price has been paid - many who left their homes have not returned.  They gave their lives to defend their country’s honor.  And this afternoon we have come together with humbled hearts to pay tribute to the memory of one of our boys to whom it fell the lot to make the supreme sacrifice.  Pvt. Wilbur Arthur BROOM entered the armed services Oct. 13, 1943.  He was inducted into the army in Indianapolis, Ind.  After training in camps in the U.S., he shipped overseas in Aug. 1944, landing in England.  From there, he was taken to France, Belgium, Germany, and Luxembourg.  He served in the 110th Infantry, 28th Division.  In the bitter fighting in the “break through” in December of ‘44, the Keystone Division, as it was called, was forced to make many sacrifices to carry out the task assigned to them.  A telegram received by his wife on Jan. 19th, stated that he was “Missing in Action” 20th of December.  No more word was received until April 3rd when she received another message from the War Department stating that he was “Killed in Action 20th of December”.  Wilbur Arthur, son of the late John William and Thelia Belle CROWN BROOM, was born in Alma, Feb. 9, 1914.  He was the youngest of 8 children.  The brothers and sisters surviving him are: Roy of St. James; Paul of Chester; Fred of Cape Girardeau, Mo.; Riley Fernando of Gary, Ind.; Mrs. Lavina SHUFELDT of Iuka; and Mrs. Carrie PURCELL of Alma.  He attended the Alma school and took an active part in the activities of the youth of his community.  The other children establishing homes their own left Wilbur the last one home he shared with his mother, the cares and joys that attend the usual daily living.  On Nov. 6, 1937, he was married to Miss Jessie DODSON of Kinmundy and soon after they moved to Gary, Ind., to make their home.  He was employed by the City Service Co. of East Chicago and was known to be a faithful, industrious workman. A little daughter, Lila Marcella, came in to their home, but only for a fleeting stay for at the age of 13 days, this little flower faded and died.  Into the building of their new home in Gary went the hopes and dreams of a young couple with life before them.  But these dreams were not to be realized for all to soon the war clouds cast a shadow over this home and Wilbur answered his country’s call to duty.  With a smile on his face and a prayer in his heart, he left home and loved ones to go into the thickest of the struggle against our foes.  As had been planned when the new home was built, his mother stayed with them during the cold months of the year.  And after he was called away to service, his wife continued to open her heart and home to Mother BROOM.  These two good women who survive him, found comfort and solace in their companionship.  Today Wilbur will be laid beneath the soil of his native land and near his boyhood home, where his mother still resides.  And to this hallowed spot will come to his dear ones and friends to lay garlands of flowers, that they might in some visible way, express their love and appreciation.  Deep in their hearts will be the fervent hope that never again will youth be asked to pay so dear a price. 

 


 

 (V-200) James Lawson Brown, James T. Brown, and William E. Brown

James Lawson Brown was a Civil War veteran; James T. Brown (likely Spanish American War veteran),

    and William E. Brown, was a Civil War veteran.  

 James Lawson and William E. Brown were brothers.  

 James T Brown is likely the son of their first cousin William Henry Brown, also a Civil War veteran. 

 


 

Harvey Brown

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – April 11, 1918;

 

Fort Riley, Kan.; March 30, 1918

Hello Pearl  - Have received two issues of the Marion County Express and sure does seem good to read the news which I read over and over until it is most worn out, not that I’m homesick, but am afraid I might have overlooked something.  Well as yet, I am still in Ft. Riley, but is very uncertain for how long as there has been quite a number transferred to several different ports, some to Pennsylvania, Georgia, California, and Washington.  Don’t know the meaning, but it sounds favorable of a little trip for them across the water, as these are all seaports to which they have been shipped.  Some of the boys I came here with went away last week, part that went didn’t want to go and part that were left wanted to go.  For me I’m satisfied at the best, orders are orders and what they say goes; if they say ship me I know I’ll go where I am sent.

            The branch I’m in is one of the best branches of the army.  It is the Field Hospital and lots of good things in this branch to know; they all tell me it is the most interesting position in the army.  Our lieutenant was lecturing us this morning, telling us all the good points and telling us to carry our heads high and look like “honest to God soldiers” as they would have to give us our credits when we play our part, as we are to be first Hospital about five miles back from the firing line, next to the Evacuation Hospital, then the Base Hospital.  For that reason we have a lot to learn in regard to nursing and caring for the wounded, so don’t think we will leave here for quite a while.

            We are taking schooling about 3 hours each day, besides in each tent there is a squad leader, of which I happen to be one, and we are requested to hold school in our tents, teaching anatomy and physiology besides First Aid Work.  I am rather a poor teacher, though orders are so one can do things in better shape in the army than elsewhere.  I am having a good school in my tent and will have examinations every three weeks.

            Besides our schooling we are taught the English and French style of drill and take several hikes, our last being this morning.  After our inspection of person and tent quarters by our Lieutenant, we hiked to Funston and the way we went was about eight miles there and back.  On my hike this a.m., I learned something which I should have learned years ago and that was that about one-half mile east of our tents stands an old stone building that was the first capitol of the territory of Kansas and known as Pawnee, where the officers of the Civil War held conference and the first fight of the Civil War took place about one-fourth mile east of Pawnee.

            The coming week we will spend the most of our time learning to pitch our Field Hospital tents, which when all pitched covers 3 acres of ground, and we are to learn to pitch all this within thirty minutes, and take down and roll up and load in fifteen minutes.  Some speed, I guess, but it can be done.  There are nine men to a tent, small or large, in doing the job and so it is, at all the tents at the same time.  Our company were onlookers the other day to learn.  I saw I could be of some help and others and myself raised the largest sized tent in 15 minutes.  They should have all been raised in that time, but most of our officers go by instructions of books to know how to raise them and as I had been instructed by our Lieutenant and had seen one raised and had it down pat, I bossed the job besides driving a few stakes and we had it up before any of the rest.   By doing so I guess they reported me, for some Lieutenant asked me my name and to what company I belonged, which I told him and on returning to our tents my Lieutenant called me in the office and gave me command over a squad to raise the tents this week.  The record on the Field Hospital raising was done by some of Pershings men; they unloaded and raised tents and had water boiling in doctor’s apartments in 14⅓  minutes, also took same down, rolled up, loaded and ready to move in 9 minutes.

            Read Gus SPITZE’s letter in the Express which was quite interesting, although I see there are a difference in camps, for one thing where there are a small number of men who eat at one place like 180 to the side of 2800 who eat here in one hour (more snap).  At the time I read it, I know there were a lot of things quite different from what we have here.  I also saw where John FRENCH and “Bekie” MAHAN, had been made Corporals.  Good for them.  In our Company are to be 4 Lieutenants, 4 Sergeants, 11 truck drivers and the balance, hospital nurses, and the like.  Don’t know what they will make of me, but have as good chance now for Sergeant as anyone in our Company and that is where they come from.  There are several things in army life that would make a good subject to write on but as they are getting more familiar with me each day, I don’t know where to start in or what to talk about.  One of the finest nights I have seen as last Wednesday when 7000 soldiers marched over the parade ground looking their best, for inspection before the Major.  I was with them somewhere, could hardly tell where for looking around, until the band commenced to play which led the whole of us in step, and that was one time when the snap was a little more snappier than usual.  Expect you think I am wound up but this is all interesting to me and I like to tell it. You can tell all I am feeling fine and getting fat.

 

Harvey BROWN; Field Hospital, Co. B.T. 128; Fort Riley, Kan.

 


 

Lendell H. Brown - “The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 18, 1971 – “Army Warrant Officer Lendell H. BROWN, 27, son of Mrs. Ruth E. Sullens, Kinmundy, recently was assigned to the 101st Airborne Division (airmobile) in Vietnam.  WO Brown is an aviator in Company C, 101st Aviation Battalion of the division near Phu Bai.  This wife, Carole, lives in Peoria, Ill.”

 


 

Otis M. Brown - “The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 30, 1954 – “Pvt. Otis M. BROWN, son of Mr. and Mrs. Masel BROWN, Kinmundy, has reported to Brooke Army Medical Center for advanced basic training at the Medical Training Center.  He will train for medical corpsman and combat aidman.  Pvt. BROWN entered the army last May.” 

 


 

Ransom Deloss Brown

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – April 4, 1918;

Houston, Tex., Camp Logan; March 15, 1918

 

Dear Father and Mother,

            There is no man that hath left houses and lands, or father and mother, brothers and sisters, wife and children, for my sake, and the gospels, who will lose his reward, but shall receive an hundredfold, now, even in this world, lands, fathers and mothers, brothers and sisters, and in the world to come eternal life.

            Looking backward over my life’s journey and thinking of the many homes that I have visited, I think of my many friends and the many homes where I can go and be welcome, where I can eat without money or price, and the hundreds of fathers and mothers and brothers and sisters, who would nurse me through sickness, I fell that all these things are mine because I have been brought up by Christian parents who taught me the gospel of liberty which frees me from sin with all its terrors.  I never hated sin more than I do today, nor I never loved the things which make up real manhood better.  I am human and have not yet reached perfection, but for the victories of the present, I am grateful and I am pressing on toward the goal.  I am praying that I may prove worthy of friends and serve God, faithfully.  My business shall ever be to so live as to meet the approval of my best friend, Jesus the Christ, and to command Him to others.  For our highest service lies in this, that others may catch a glimpse of God through our lives.

            I am getting my mail all O.K. now.  I am glad that you all rejoice with me in the sacrifice that I am now making hoping that it, may be the means of giving us all many more blessings.  I continue to be happy that I am able for this service, but we never know what sorrow may come to us.  Let us pray the Father to give us grace to bear up in the midst of adversities.  Let us not try to pull into our todays what we may or may not be our tomorrows.  May our todays be filled with loving service, then our tomorrows will be joyful and beautiful and our dark valleys will be fewer. With all the love my soul possesses, I close with a firm faith in God to whom I commend you until it is ours to meet again.

 

Ransom Deloss BROWN

 


 

Dean Brubaker - “The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 8, 1945 – “PFC Dean BRUBAKER arrived home Oct. 28th after receiving his discharge at Ft. Sheridan the day previous.  He is again with his wife and family in the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wesley JONES in this city.  Dean entered the service Dec. 12, 1943, and shipped overseas May 12, 1944, landing in England.  From there he went to France on D-Day 28, and then into Germany.  He started home Oct. 3, and landed in Boston, Oct. 12th.  He arrived here Oct. 15th for a 9 day furlough.  PFC BRUBAKER wears the Good Conduct Medal and the European Theater of Operations Ribbon with 4 stars representing the battles of Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, and Central Germany.”

 


 

Kenneth D. Bundy

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 27, 1957 – “Kenneth D. BUNDY, son of Mrs. Eunice E. BUNDY, Kinmundy, recently was promoted to specialist third class at Ft. Belvoir, Va., where he is a member of the 79th Engineer Group.  BUNDY, a driver in Company B of the group’s 575th Battalion, entered the Army in Dec. 1955, and completed basic training at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo.  The 21-year-old solider attended Kinmundy-Alma High School.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 12, 1957 – “Kenneth BUNDY recently received his discharge from the army.  He arrived here Saturday night for a visit with his mother, Mrs. Eunice BUNDY and Bobby.”

 


 

William B. Bundy - “The Kinmundy Express” – July 31, 1952 – “T. Sgt. and Mrs. Wm. B. BUNDY and daughter arrived July 27th from Germany. They will spend their furlough at the home of his mother, Mrs. Eunice BUNDY. He has been in Germany 6 years, and is enroute to James Connley Air Base, Texas.”

 


 

Forrest Burkett - "The Kinmundy Express" - Dec. 7, 1944 - "PFC Forrest BURKETT returned to camp in California. Forest is a tail gunner on a B-24."

 


 

Lewis Burkett - “The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 2, 1954 – “Friends and relatives gathered at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis BURKETT for a basket dinner to welcome the return of their son, Bob, who has been stationed in Korea.  He returned home Tuesday.”  (A list of those attending was included.) 

 


 

Virgil Burkett

"The Kinmundy Express" - Nov. 25, 1943 - "Here’s a nice letter from Virgil BURKETT, F 2 c of the U.S. Navy aboard the U.S.S. Walker. And I just imagine that Virgil has seen just a little action. Here is what he says: I want to thank you and all who make it possible for we boys in the service to receive your paper. I know I should have written you sooner, but just never got around to it. I know we enjoy reading it very much. I have been in the service almost a year now and out of that year I have seen seven months sea duty. I have seen quite a lot of the world and expect to see more soon. We have had nothing but emergency leaves. I sure would love to see all you people back home, but I guess it is impossible now. If you have someone in the service, which I know you have, and most people have, be sure and write to them often. It is hard to express how much they enjoy getting letters. I read the letter that Major BROOM wrote in the last issue that I received. It was a very nice letter and is just like he said. I don’t think it will be too long until we all will be back home again. Well Mr. VALLOW, I guess that’s about all for now, except keep buying bonds and keep those letters coming. Here’s hoping to see you all soon."

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Dec. 14, 1944 - "Here’s one from Virgil BURKETT, F1 c, who is sailing around on the U.S.S. Walker. He says: Thought I would write a few lines as I am sending a Christmas card. First of all, I want to thank you and all who make it possible for we fellows to receive your paper. I don’t receive it very often, but that is no fault of yours, I know. Anyway, I know it is greatly appreciated by us fellows. Now to tell you a little about the Walker. We were with McARTHUR when he returned to the Philippines. We were under a quite a lot of air attacks and believe the Walker did her share. One day the natives came to the ship to trade. They seemed very happy that the Americans were back. They were clean and could speak English. The weather there is quite warm and rains quite a lot. Well, I guess that’s about all for this time, so here is wishing you A Merry Christmas."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 30, 1945 – “Guam, Aug. 16 - Virgil Guy BURKETT, 22, machinist’s mate, second class, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank BURKETT, Kinmundy, Ill., serves aboard the USS Walker, one of a 133-warship armada which helped to force the surrender of Japan.  Arriving on Japanese shores at a time when the enemy homeland already was reeling under devastating carrier-plane blows, this destroyer not only participated in the show down scene, as a screening unit for successive air attacks but pumped it’s own main-battery shells into Jap targets.  The crew had witnessed the tide of battle recede from Tarawa to the Japanese mainland - reminding the Japs to “Remember Pearl Harbor”.  Tokyo’s promises a watery grave all destroyers that approached her shores, human torpedoes, baka bombs, Kamikaze pilots, and invulnerable defenses failed to materialize.  The Walker operated within 2 miles of Japan unopposed.  Her battle record includes the operations at Taraw, Wotie, Hollandia, Saipan, Tinian, Guam Leyte, Okinawa, and Kyushu.”

 


 

Darryl L. Butts - “The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 1972 – “Army Sergeant, Darryl L. BUTTS, son of Pete Butts, Kinmundy, is near Cu Chi, Vietnam.  The 25 year old soldier is serving as Intelligence Sergeant with Headquarters Company of the 25th Infantry Division's 3rd Brigade.  He entered the U.S. Army in Feb. 1969, and was last stationed at Ft. Huachuca, Ariz.  He holds the Army Commendation Medal.  He received his B.A. Degree from the Southern Illinois University at Carbondale in 1968.  His wife, Barbara, lives in Carterville, Ill."

 


 

Bob Butts - “The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 28, 1954 – “Pvt. Bob Dean BUTTS, 23, son of Mr. Pete BUTTS, Kinmundy, graduated from the 8-week Engineer Equipment Repairman Course, U.S. Army, Ft. Belvoir, Va.”

 

 

George E. Butts

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 22, 1945 – “Miletus: Sgt. George E. BUTTS, who is home from the Philippines, and is spending a 45 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Pete BUTTS, and other relatives.  He will report to camp in Texas after his 15 day furlough is up.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 2, 1946 –“Miletus (from last week): S. Sgt. George BUTTS, who is stationed at Scott Field, spent the weekend with his parents, Pete BUTTS and wife.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 3, 1967 – “Senior Master Sergeant George E. BUTTS, son of Pete Butts of Kinmundy, has received his second U.S. Air Force Commendation Medal at Hickam AFB, Hawaii.  Sergeant Butts was decorated for meritorious services as a personnel supt. at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio.  He was cited for his outstanding leadership and ability which contributed to the success of his units’ mission.  He is now at Hickam as a member of the Military Airlift Command which provides global airlift for the nation’s military forces.  He served in the Pacific Theater of Operations during World War II.  Sgt. Butts is a graduate of Kinmundy High School.   His wife, Agnes, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Blackwell of Farina.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Apr. 11, 1968 – “Senior Master Sergeant George E. BUTTS, son of Pete Butts of Kinmundy, has helped the Military Airlift Command’s 61st Military Airlift Wing earn the U.S. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award.  …. Sgt. Butts, a veteran of World War II, is a graduate of Kinmundy Community High School.  His wife, Agnes, is the daughter of Ray Blackwell of Farina.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 16, 1969 – “Senior Master Sergeant George E. BUTTS, son of Pete BUTTS, Kinmundy, has helped the first Military Airlift Wing earn the U.S. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award.  Sergeant Butts, a personnel superintendent at Hickam AFB, Hawaii, with a unit of the 61st will wear a distinctive ribbon as a permanent decoration.  This is the 5th time that the 61st has won the award.  The sergeant is a graduate of Kinmundy High School.  His wife, Agness, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Blackwell of Farina.”

 


 

Glen E. Butts

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 8, 1952 – “Pvt. Glen E. BUTTS of Kinmundy is now serving with the 7th Infantry Division in the west-central sector of the front in North Korea. He arrived in Korea on April 5 and is serving as a truck driver in the Service Company. A graduate of Kinmundy H.S., he entered the army last September.”

  

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 25, 1953 – “Cpl. Glen E. BUTTS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben BUTTS returned home Saturday after having spent 15 months overseas in Korea. Glen was inducted Sept. 13, 1951, and received his basic training at Camp Breckenridge, Ky. After spending leave here, he was sent to Korea as a member of the 7th Division, 17th Infantry Regiment. While in Korea, his duties consisted of truck repairing with the 17th Infantry Service Company. June 12 he arrived in San Francisco, and from there was sent to Camp Carson, Colo. for separation. As for the future, Glen is undecided, but wants to spend some time in Kinmundy resting and meeting some of his old friends.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 2, 1956 – “Pfc Glen BUTTS returned home Tuesday from Camp Carson, Colo., where he received his discharge from the U.S. Army.”

 


 

George Butts

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 31, 1952 – “T. Sgt. and Mrs. George BUTTS of San Carlos, Texas, are spending a furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Pete BUTTS.”

 


 

Harold Butts

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 20, 1945 – “PFC Harold BUTTS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben BUTTS, arrived home Dec. 8, after receiving his discharge the same day at Camp Grant.  Harold entered the service Feb. 17, 1943, and shipped overseas Aug. 20, 1943, landing in Oran Africa.  From there he went to England, then France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, and then back to France.  He started home Nov. 20, and landed at Boston on Dec. 1.  PFC Harold wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon and the European Theater Ribbon with 3 stars representing the campaigns of Central Europe, Ardennes and Rhineland.  Harold and his father, who is a veteran of World War I, are very busily engaged in conversation now as they both traveled some over the same territory.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 27, 1945 – “PFC Harold BUTTS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben BUTTS, who received his discharge, Dec. 8.  He served in the European Theater.”

 


 

(V-474) John W. "Bill" Caldwell  -  World War II - Sergeant - 204th AAF Base Unit; honorably discharged on Oct. 24, 1945;

"John W. Caldwell (Bill) was trained as a B-26 bomber mechanic assigned to the 70th Bombardment Squadron of the 13th Army Air Force and served over 2 years in Pacific war zones including Fiji, the Solomon islands, the Gilbert islands and Guadalcanal.  The Squadron was actively involved in the crucial battle for the lower Solomon's, the Battle of Midway, and then Guadalcanal.  The 70th was singled out for commendations by Generals McArthur, Marshall and Admiral Halsey for their bravery and ingenuity to keep the bullet-riddled bombers in the air in support of critical missions.  After 25 months deployed, he returned to the Alma area where he married Martha Mulvaney, raised 4 children, and engaged in farming and then retired after a long career at Southern Illinois University School of Dentistry in the Maintenance Department."


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Paul Caldwell

 

 

Paul Caldwell and his wife, Rada (Garrett) Caldwell Ford

(V-26) Paul Caldwell and his wife, Rada (Garrett) Caldwell Ford - Spring 1944.  (Paul was killed in WWII.)

"The Kinmundy Express" - Oct. 12, 1944: "Pvt. Kenneth Paul Caldwell, Alma Lad, Dies From Wounds Received in Action in Germany" 

A telegram was received by Mrs. Paul Caldwell of Alma Friday morning, stating that her husband, Pvt. Kenneth Paul Caldwell, had been seriously

wounded in action in Germany, on Sept. 17th.  On Monday morning she received another telegram stating that her husband had died of wounds on Sept. 17th. 

This was a shock to the community of Alma as well as our own community as he was well known here.  Kenneth Paul, son of Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Caldwell,

was born March 3, 1911, on Zion Prairie in Foster twp.  On March 31, 1934, he was married to Miss Rada Garrett, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Selby Garrett. 

After their marriage, they lived a short while in Vandalia where Paul was employed by the Hayes Bros. Hatchery.  Then they moved to Alma where he was employed

as a clerk in the Wilson Store and the Rainey Store.  In 1941, he assumed the management of the C.A. Glore Lumber Yard, which position he held when he entered

the services of his country.  He was inducted into the army on Dec. 29, 1943, was shipped overseas, landing in England on July 1st.  Here he remained until July 21st

when he crossed the channel into France.  He was a member of the infantry.  Besides his beloved companion and parents, he leaves 2 brothers, PFC Loren Caldwell

in the Southwest Pacific, and Marion of Wilmington, Ill.  After reaching England, Paul wrote to his wife that he had been converted and was leading the life of a true Christian. 

He was a member of Kinmundy Lodge No. 398, A.F. & A.M., and his will be the first gold star to be put upon the service rolls of the lodge.  The whole community extends

heart-felt sympathy to the bereaved relatives."   

 


 

 

 

 

(V-312) Clyde Bradley Camerer

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 10, 1945 – “Relatives and friends here have received word of the promotion of Capt. Clyde Bradley CAMERER, medical director of the U.S. Navy, to the rank of Rear Admiral.  Admiral CAMERER was born and reared in Kinmundy, the only son of the late Dr. and Mrs. J.D. CAMERER, and a grandson of the late Dr. BRADLEY, a former resident of this community.  Admiral CAMERER has spent 41 years in the Navy and traveled to almost all parts of the world.  Recently, a hospital at Parris Island, South Carolina, was erected under his supervision.  He was then sent to the Great Lakes Naval Station.  About 2 months ago, he was sent to the west coast and is now in the Philippines.  Mrs. CAMERER is a sister to Mrs. W.S. PRUETT of this city.  Admiral and Mrs. CAMERER spent a few days here recently while they were enroute to the West Coast.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 29, 1952 – “Rear Admiral Clyde B. CAMERER, MC U.S.N. Retired, and wife, the former Martha STEUBER, arrived at her sister’s home, Mrs. W.S. PRUETT from San Diego, Calif. The will go to Ridgefarm within a few days for a short visit with Mrs. CAMERER’S sister, Mrs. E.M. SCHERMERHORN.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 (V-336) Mancil Earl Cantrell

 

 

 (V-335) Mancil Earl Cantrell - Ship he served on WWI

 


 

 (V-337) Melbourne Cantrell in WWII

 


 

(V-126) Marvin Carter

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-148) Seymore and Darrell Chance

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 11, 1960 - “Pvt. Darrell D. CHANCE, son of Mr. and Mrs. C.S. CHANCE, has recently received a promotion to PFC.  He sent to Engineer Foreman School for 8 weeks at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo., and is now a combat construction specialist in 299th Engineer Battalion in Heoehst, Germany.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-67) Harold Chance

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 7, 1946 –“T5 Harold CHANCE, son of Mr. and Mrs. C.S. CHANCE, residing northwest of this city, arrived home Feb. 24, after seeing action in both theaters of war.  Harold entered the service June 18, 1943 and took basic at Camp Crowder, Mo. in the Signal Corps.  He shipped overseas Feb. 11, 1945, landing in France.  From there he went into Germany, then back to France, where he shipped for Luzon.  From there he went to Japan.  He left Japan the latter part of January and landed in Seattle, Wash.  From there he went to Jefferson Barracks, where he received his discharge Feb. 24.  T5 CHANCE wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon, the American Theater Ribbon, the European Theater Ribbon with 1 star representing the campaign of Central Germany, the Philippine Liberation Ribbon; the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon and the Distinguished Service Unit Citation awarded for service in Central Germany.  As to his future, Harold says he is undecided as to what he will do.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-46) James Chance

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 16, 1946 –“James CHANCE, Fireman 1st Class, son of Mr. and Mrs. Seymour CHANCE, arrived home last Thursday to spend a 30 day leave with his parents.  James entered the service Jan. 12, 1945, and received his boot training at Great Lakes.  From there he was sent to Shumaker, Calif., from there to Treasure Island, then to PT Base 17, Philippine Islands, where he was stationed for the past 13 months.  He left the Philippines April 22, and landed on Treasure Island, May 10th.  After his leave has expired, he will report to Chicago for reassignment.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

(V-123) John D. Charlton

 


 

Gerald Charlton - "The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 15, 1953 – “Pvt. Gerald CHASTEEN of Ft. Knox spent the weekend here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Morris CHASTEEN.”

 


 

Lester B. Chasteen

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 1, 1960 - “Pvt. Lester B. CHASTEEN has been transferred from Fort Sill, Okla to Neurnberg, Germany, where he will be stationed for 18 months.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 29, 1960 - “Army Pvt. Lester B. CHASTEEN, whose wife, Patricia, and mother, Mrs. Blanche CHASTEEN, live in Kinmundy, has completed 8 weeks of advanced individual cannoneer training at the Artillery and Missile School, Fort Sill, Okla., Dec. 10.  He entered the Army last June and completed basic training at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo.  The 23 year old soldier is a 1956 graduate of Kinmundy Alma High School and was employed by the Salem Times Commoner before entering the Army.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 31, 1962 - “Mr. Lester CHASTEEN, arrived in Kinmundy Saturday night after recently receiving his discharge from the U.S. Army.  He has been in the army 2 years of which 17 months were overseas duty.”

 


 

Marvin R. Chasteen - “The Kinmundy Express” – March 29, 1962 - “Army PFC Martin R. CHASTEEN, son of Mrs. Blanche M. Chasteen, Kinmundy, recently participated in a combined arms phase of the 5 week 4th Armored Division field training exercises in the Grafenwohr-Hohenfels area of Germany.  Chasteen is assigned to Company A of the division’s 4th Quartermaster Battallion in Goppinen.  He entered the Army in Jan. 1961 and completed basic training at Ft. Jackson, S.C.  The 20 year old solider is a 1960 graduate of Kinmundy Alma High School.  Before entering the army, he was employed by Brown Shoe Co., Salem.”

 


 

Gerald Cheadle

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 9, 1958 – “Sp. 4 Gerald CHEADLE, RA17, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom CHEADLE, who is stationed at Sandholen, Germany, with the U.S. Army toured the World Fair at Brussels last week.  He wrote his parents about the trip.”  (The letter was included in this writeup.)

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Apr. 9, 1959 – “Gerald L. CHEADLE, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. CHEADLE, Rt. 3; Kinmundy, recently was promoted to specialist five in Mannheim, Germany, where he is a member of the 51st Ordnance Group.  A supply specialist in the group’s headquarters detachment, he entered the army in Dec. 1956 and arrived in Europe the following November.  He is a 1956 graduate of LaGrove Community High School, Farina.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 10, 1959 – “Sp. 5 Gerold L. CHEADLE of the U.S. Army arrived home last Friday after completing 3 years of service.  For the past 2 years he was stationed at Mannheim, Germany.  He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom CHEADLE.”

 


 

Lester Cheadle

“The Kinmundy Express” – Apr. 14, 1966 – “Mr. Lester CHEADLE, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Cheadle, left Sunday for St. Louis where he was inducted into the army on Monday morning after which he left for basic training.  After completion of his basic, he will go into officer training school.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Apr. 20, 1967 – “PFC Lester CHEADLE, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Cheadle, former Kinmundy residents, is stationed in Germany.”

 


 

Mervin Cheadle

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 18, 1951 – “Mervin CHEADLE, S.N. of the U.S. Navy, has recently been promoted from S.A. to S.N. aboard the U.S.S. Hemminger, Destroyer Escort, at Norfolk, Va.  Incidently, Mervin had his first experience in being in the path of a hurricane.  For two days and nights the Hemminger was anchored at sea.  Winds were up to 120 miles per hour strong.  Mervin is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom CHEADLE residing north of this city.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 11, 1952 – “Petty officer 3rd Class Mervin CHEADLE, U.S. Navy, is spending an 18 day furlough leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. T.P. CHEADLE. Mervin is stationed on a Destroyer Escort and has done quite a bit of traveling the past year. He is due for Korean waters in the near future.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 27, 1954 – “Mervin CHEADLE of the U.S. Navy left Thursday for his Navy base at Norfolk, Va. after spending 15 days leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom CHEADLE.  He will be discharged from the Navy in September.” 

 


 

Ronald Cheadle

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 5, 1959 – “Ronald CHEADLE, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom CHEADLE has enlisted in the Marine Corps.  He left Sunday for St. Louis.  He will fly from there to San Diego for his basic training.  Ronald has a brother, Jerry, who is with the armed forces and is stationed at Sandofer, Germany.”

 

"The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 22, 1959 – “Pfc. Ronald CHEADLE of the Marine Corps, who was stationed at Memphis, Tenn., has arrived home for a 15 day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom CHEADLE.  When he reports back to duty it will be to Camp New River, North Carolina for helicopter schooling.”

 


 

Stanley T. Cheadle

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 2, 1964 – “FA Stanley CHEADLE left Christmas night for New London, Conn. after spending a 20-day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Cheadle.  Stanley has completed a 12 week course at the Great Lakes, and will now go to Submarine school in New London, Conn.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 12, 1965 –“Engineman Third Class Stanley T. CHEADLE, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom P. Cheadle, of Kinmundy, is serving aboard the submarine USS Ronguil, which returned to the United States July 23 after extended operations with the Seventh Fleet in the Western Pacific.” 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-242b) Ervin Floyd Cheatum

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 14, 1945 – “6th Army Group Germany - The city of Wurzburg, in southwestern Germany, lay in ruins after receiving terrible blastings from the air.  The rubble-strew streets and gutted buildings were deceivingly quiet.  But hidden in doorways and behind walls, the enemy was waiting with machine guns trained on advancing American doughboys of an infantry division.  On the outskirts of the city, Combat Command ‘A’ of the 12th Armored “Hellcat” Division poised, ready to act as trouble shooters in case Krauts proved difficult to root.  A short time later, the quiet was shattered as the well entrenched Germans poured round after round of fire into the American infantry.  Combat Command “A” moved in swiftly, its advanced tank elements led by 1st Lt. Thomas F. JOHNSON.  The tanks moved from one infantry sector to another, blasting the stubborn enemy in one of the last actions in crushing Germany.  “I don’t know how many Krauts we killed or captured in Wurzburg, but we didn’t take many prisoners”, Lieut. JOHNSON said.  “We just kept driving through the town, shooting at everything we saw.”  The 7th Army’s 12th Armored Division, a component of Gen. DONOVAN’s 6th Army Group, had 3 battalions - one of the tanks, one of the infantry, and one of field artillery - in it’s hard hitting combat command ‘A’.  The fighting unit is supported by companies of medic, ordinance, and combat engineers.  Among members of Combat Command ‘A’ is T. Sgt. Ervin F. CHEATUM, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ervin CHEATUM of this city.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 21, 1945 – “T. Sgt. Ervin Floyd CHEATUM arrived here Sunday to spend a 30 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ervin CHEATUM.  Needless to say, this lad was certainly glad to get home again.  Sgt. Floyd entered the service on Oct. 20, 1942 and was trained in various camps in the States.  He was shipped overseas on Sept. 17, 1944, landing in England.  From there he as sent to France and then to Germany.  On February 21, 1945, he was wounded in the right leg at Henlisheim, Germany.  He was then sent to a hospital in Nacy, France, and from there to an English Hospital on April 17th.  He sailed from England May 17, landing in Boston on May 29th, where he was take to the Miles Standish Hospital.  He remained there a few days and was sent to the Winters General Hospital, Topeka, Kan., where he is now a patient.  Sgt. CHEATUM wears the Good Conduct Medal, The Infantry Combat Medal, and the European Theater of Operations Ribbon with 2 stars.  He has a brother, PFC Francis CHEATUM, serving in the army in France”

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Dale Cheeley

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 25, 1945 – “Omega: It was reported here last week that Dale CHEELY, son of Mr. and Mrs. Forrest CHEELY, former residents of Omega, has been killed in action.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 17, 1949 – “Omega: Several from here attended services held for Sgt. Dale CHEELEY whose body recently arrived from overseas.  Services were held at the Church of God at Salem with interment in the Christian Church cemetery here.”

 


 

Alonzo Church - “The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 1, 1945 – “S. Sgt. and Mrs. Alonzo CHURCH were here Thursday greeting friends.  At present, they are at home with Mrs. CHURCH’s mother, in Iola, since Sgt. CHURCH received his discharge on Oct. 6.    Being an attorney-at-law, upon entering the service, April 22, 1942, Alonzo was assigned to the Counter Intelligence Corps, Military Intelligence Service, War Dept.  Throughout the war, he has been stationed in Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, and Oklahoma.  He was assigned to the Air Corps.  He was discharged Oct. 6 at Patterson Field, Ohio.  We are not only happy to welcome Lonnie and his good wife back with us again.  But we are sorry to say that Lonnie says he hardly thinks that he will re-open his law office in Kinmundy.”

 


 

Richard Clark - “The Kinmundy Express” – Apr. 21, 1955 – “Pfc. Richard CLARK, son of Mrs. Bertha F. CLARK, Kinmundy, is one of the 26,000 soldiers slated to participate in Exercise Apple Jack during May at the Yakima Firing Center near Ft. Lewis, Wash.  Apple Jack will test the efficiency of infantry and support units in mountainous and dessert terrain.  The simulated use of atomic weapons will be one of the conditions of the exercise.  CLARK, a cannoneer with Battery B of the 2nd Infantry Division’s 12th Field Artillery Battalion, entered the Army in Nov. 1953, and received his basic training at Camp Chaffee, Ark.  His wife, Zola, lives in Tacoma, Wash.”   

 


 

William "Bill" Clark - “The Kinmundy Express” – June 21, 1956 – “William R. CLARK, son of Mrs. Bertha K. CLARK, of Kinmundy, was promoted to Marine  Sgt. on May 23, while with the 3rd Marine Division in Japan.  He is a baker assigned to Detachment 3, 3rd Marine Regiment, a unit of the 3rd Marine Division.  Before entering the service, he attended Salem H.S., Salem, Ill.”

 


 

Jim Cobb -  “The Kinmundy Express” – March 13, 1969 – “Mr. and Mrs. Jim COBB and son, Brian Jay, returned last week from Okinawa after 18 months of service.  In route to New Jersey, they enjoyed a short visit with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Cobb of Alma, and Mr. and Mrs. Leon Miller of Kinmundy”   (A list of those calling to the Miller home was included.)

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-351) Harrison Colclasure

 

"The Kinmundy Express” – July 4, 1974 – “Mr. and Mrs. Wyett COLCLASURE received word Monday morning that their son, Capt. Harrison COLCLASURE has been promoted to the rank of Major.  Major Colclasure is on duty with NORAD at Ent, AFB, Colorado Springs, Colo.  He along with his wife and 2 sons reside in Colorado Springs, Colo."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Wyett B. Colclasure II

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 16, 1967 – “Wyett B. COLCLASURE II, 22, whose parents live in Kinmundy, was promoted to Army captain, Feb. 7 in Vietnam, where he is serving with the 9th Infantry Division.  Capt. Colclasure, exec. Officer of the division’s headquarters company, entered the Army in Aug. 1964 and arrived overseas last December.  He is a 1960 graduate of Kinmundy-Alma High School, and received his B.S. and M.S. degrees at the Univ. of Illinois in 1964 and 1965.  His wife, Virginia, lives in Cowden.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 4, 1969 – “Army Captain Wyett H. COLCLASURE II, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wyett H. Colclasure of Kinmundy, is serving as a rest officer for the Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Test Division at the Army’s coldest post in the world, the Artic Test Center, Alaska.  CPT Colclasure is working with the Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Test division which tests such items as chemical agents, gas masks, and biological substances.  This harsh land, beset by high winds and temperatures which drop to minus 60 degrees during the winter, is a sharp contrast to the tropic conditions he experienced in Vietnam.  The 26 year old soldier was graduated from the Univ. of Ill. in 1965 with a Masters of Science degree and received an ROTC commission.  His last duty assignment before being assigned to the Test Center was at Ft. McClellan, Ala.”

 


 

 

(V-379) Eli Conant

 


 

(V-180) Gary Conant  - 101st Americal Division 23 M.P. Co.

 


 

Lewis Conant

 AThe Marion County Express@; Kinmundy, Illinois; Jan. 2, 1919 - Lewis CONANT, who is stationed at an ensign’s school at Cleveland, Ohio, is spending a short furlough with relatives and friends, of this city.  He still has a few months to serve before receiving his commission in the Navy and will then no doubt be placed in the Merchant Marine Service.

 


 

Loren Conant

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 9, 1950 – “Loren CONANT Dies in Fire Near Odin Friday Night: A World War II veteran who saw service in Korea before the Korean war, lost his life, a fellow worker was badly burned, and a third fellow worker escaped early Saturday morning when fire and unknown origin destroyed five single-room cabin on the James OGG hog farm, one mile north of Odin.  Loren CONANT, 38, son of Ira D. CONANT, of Iuka, was burned alive in his flaming cabin.   His two friends were unable to arouse him or save him.  Funeral was held Monday afternoon, with the Wilson Funeral Home of Odin, in charge of arrangements.  The three men were employed by OGG to care for his 500 or more hogs.  They resided on the place, each staying in a single cabin.  They had been in OGG’s employ for about a month.  Leo LEWIS, 22, was first to be awakened by the cracking of flames at about 1:30 a.m.  In running through the door of his cabin, he was badly burned about the face, legs and arms.  He called for CONANT, but couldn’t arouse him.  The third man, Arthur LOUDERBACK, 34, was able to get out of his cabin without injury and they ran to the home of a neighbor, Bud ADAMS.  In the meantime, flames were noticed by Mrs. Fred STINE, of Odin, who notified the Odin Fire Department.  By the time the department reached the scene, four of the cabins had been destroyed and the fifth was blazing.  CONANT’s charred remains were not found by firemen until the ashes of his cabin had cooled.  Awaiting the recovery of the body, the Marion county coroner ordered the other two men held by the sheriff, but they were released after the coroner’s jury absolved them of blame.  Origin of the fire was not determined.  CONANT was born June 13, 1912, at Kinmundy, and served 4 years in World War II, with the Navy.  Some time after his discharge he reenlisted this time in the Army and did duty in Korea, taking his discharge before the Korean war broke out.  In addition to his father, he leaves two brothers, Emmett of Brentwood, Mo. and Billy, U.S. Navy.  (Salem Republican)”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-178) Lyle Conant

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Sept. 2, 1943 - And here’s one from Pvt. Lyle E. CONANT, who is sojourning in merry old England. "How are you? I am fine. I get your paper about twice a month. It takes a little time for it to get here but I am sure glad to get it. I think you should be over here, and show these folks how to raise hogs and tell them which side of the road to drive on as they drive on the left side. Well, I must close. When you get a few days off, come over and see me and I’ll show you around."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 13, 1945 – “Pvt. Lyle CONANT arrived here the night of Sept. 4, to spend a 30 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William CONANT and family, residing in the Sandy Branch community.  Lyle entered the army Nov. 3, 1942, and shipped overseas July 1, 1943, landing in Scotland.  From there he went to England where he was stationed during his entire time spent abroad.  He was a member of the Chemical Warfare Div., 92nd Bomb Group.  He left England on Aug. 26, on the Queen Elizabeth landing in New York, Aug. 31.  He and Harold ROBB were on the same boat coming home but knew nothing about it until they met in the Railway station in Chicago waiting for the train to bring them to Kinmundy.”

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Mack Conant - “The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 7, 1954 – “Pvt. Mack CONANT Now in Korean Base Section: Pvt. Mack O. CONANT, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.E. CONANT, Alma, recently joined the Korean Base Section’s 114th Quartermaster Registration Co.  The base section controls most of the rear area units which provide supplies, services, communications and transportation for other UN forces on the peninsula.  Private CONANT entered the Army last June and was formerly stationed at Fort Hood, Texas.” 

 


 

   

(V-373) Albert D. Correll 

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 29, 1945 – “Cpl. Albert D. CORRELL and wife, who have been stationed at Monroe, La., are home on a 60 day furlough visiting relatives and friends in this vicinity.  He has received a discharge and re-enlisted for a short term in the Air Corps.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 31, 1946 –“Cpl. Albert D. CORRELL left Friday for Greensboro, N.C. after spending a 60 day furlough here with his wife and parents, Mr. and Mrs. O.E. CORRELL.  He re-enlisted for another year.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-175) Nathan Courtright

Salem Times-Commoner - "Former Salem Man taking Part in Somalia Operation" 

"Being part of an important mission is something for which every Marine trains.  Because of this, Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Nathan R. Courtright was ready for his duties as part of the force that provided cover for the final withdrawal of United Nations troops in Somalia during Operation United Shield.  For more than two years, United Nations forces protected humanitarian relief efforts amid the chaos of Somalia's internal unrest.  Courtright, the 21-year-old (grand)son of Phil and Monna Frakes of Salem, is aboard the Japan-based amphibious assault ship USS Belleau Wood as part of a special purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force formed from the Marine Corp's Third Marine Expenditionary Force.  The Belleau Wood, plus three San Diega-based amphibious ships USS Fort Fisher, USS Essex, and USS Odgen carried about 2,700 Marine from Camp Pendleton, California and Okinawa, Japan, which were the protective force for the last United Nations soldiers leaving Mogadishu.  "I was glad to be part of the operation", said Courtright, a 1992 graduate of Salem Community High School.  Since August 1992, with the U.S. Marine Corps involvement in the Somalia humanitarian effort, hundreds of thousands of lives have been saved.  The U.S. support of Opeartion United Shield is part of a longstanding commitment to the United Nations."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Albert D. Correll

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 2, 1945 – “Cpl. Albert D. CORRELL of Harling, Texas is spending a furlough here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. O.E. CORRELL and other relatives and friends.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 1, 1945 – “Cpl. and Mrs. Albert CORRELL left Sunday for Monroe, La. where Cpl. CORRELL is now stationed.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 29, 1945 – “Omega: Albert CORRELL, who has been discharged from the army is here on furlough.  He has enlisted in the army for another year.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 25, 1946 –“Word has been received here of the promotion of Cpl. Albert CORRELL to that of Sergeant.  He is son of Mr. and Mrs. O.E. CORRELL of this city, and is stationed somewhere in Germany.”

 


 

Eugene W. Cosby

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 23, 1945 – “Swift School: Pvt. Eugene W. COSBY left Saturday for Chanute Field at Rantoul, Ill. after spending a week with his wife, Helen and her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom HELPINGSTINE and family.  Helen is remaining a few weeks longer.”

 


 

Eugene M. Craig

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – March 6, 1918;

 Camp Logan, Houston, Texas – Feb. 9, 1918

 

Dear Editor: As I have the time and pleasure this afternoon, I will drop you and the people of Kinmundy a few lines to inform you that the Kinmundy boys at Camp Logan at the present time are fine and dandy and doing good work for their country.  We have been having some real warfare for the past three days.  Our company has been out in the trenches and stayed three days and nights.  To think of it at home would seem pretty hard, but after you are in there a day or so you get used to it and don’t mind it so much.  All that is hard is the mud and eats.  Of course it had to rain and make it disagreeable for awhile, but we tried to keep from complaining too much.  We went over the top in drill and had four attacks of gas.  Of course you all know that gas is one of our most deadly weapons when in battle with the Germans, and we are drilled hard on that subject.  The gas comes over the trenches in a big yellow cloud and fills them.  We have the gas masks, there are signal shots up in the air to warn us that there is going to be a gas attack and we hurriedly put on our masks.  There are four or five different kinds of gas and the one they use on us is tear gas; it will not kill, but will give you an idea what the deadly gas is, and that way we are drilled to it.  Well folks, I guess you are tired of so much gas, so I will say that us fellows here in Texas have got it on you for weather.  It has been a fine winter here and very little cold weather.  I see in the paper where you have had a white blanket most of the winter and some severe cold weather.  It is raining here today and we are glad of it for the dust is pretty bad on us.  There is a sand storm every week or so that is very disagreeable, otherwise it has been fine down here and we have enjoyed it.  I see by the Marion Co. Express that you have had another fire.  It seems like Kinmundy is an unlucky place for fires.  I send my sympathy to F.J. NIRIDER and family for I know it was a hard blow on them to lose their beautiful home.  We have a Y.M.C.A. near us so we can get books and many other things that we were used to at home and also have a Bible study once a week, so we keep up to that point as near as we can.  There has been a big tabernacle built in the camp and thousands of the boys have been converted.  It certainly is grand that this can be done in camp.  Camp Logan is lucky for not having more sickness for the rest of the camps have had their share.  Well dear Kinmundy people, I will close and prepare for mess, for a soldier must not miss that.  I do not know when we will sail across the pond, but not before long, so goodbye with the best of success for you.

 

I remain your funny friend,   Musician Eugene M. CRAIG

 


 

Carl Crain

:"The Kinmundy Express" - Aug. 31, 1944 - "Here’s a nice letter from Cpl. Carl CRAIN, who is in France or was on Aug. 20th when this letter was written. He says: I have been contemplating on writing you this letter for some time but just never got around to it. So, before I go any farther, I would like to thank you from the bottom of my heart. I don’t believe you can realize just how much the home town paper means to all the boys that have been away from home as long as I have. It will soon be 3 years since I left the good old U.S.A. and during all that time we have been tactical set-up. I’ve seen men die, Mr. VALLOW, and that is something you can’t forget. I really get a kick out of the boys back there wanting to come over here. I did too, once, but now I’d give anything in the world just to get back where it is peaceful and quiet. I know they think they could be more use over here, but someone has to be there as well as here. They really don’t know how lucky they are. Well, Mr. VALLOW, we can’t take much time to write so I’ll close thanking you again for the paper."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 22, 1945 – “Cpl. Carl C. CRAIN arrived here Wednesday of last week to spend a 30 day rest period with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ruben CRAIN.  He landed in New York on the Sunday previous and was sent direct to Fort Sheridan, where he was issued the necessary papers to bring him home.  Needless to say, Mr. and Mrs. CRAIN are mighty happy over this occasion, as well as Cpl. CRAIN’s many friends.  This is his first trip home since Aug. 1941.  Cpl. CRAIN entered the service on Aug. 20, 1940, and after training in various camps, was shipped overseas Feb. 19, 1942, landing in Iceland.  He was stationed there until Aug. 5, 1943, when he was shipped to England.  He entered France July 7, 1944, attached to the Field Artillery of the First Army.  Now his battalion is attached to the Air Corps.  Corp. CRAIN wears 6 service stripes on his sleeve.  His left breast is adorned with the good conduct ribbon representing Pre-Pearl Harbor, American Theater of Operations (European, African, and Middle Eastern.)  This ribbon contains 4 stars representing the battles of Normandy Campaign, Northern France Campaign and German Ground Combat.  The 4th star was awarded for knocking down a Buzz (V2) Bomb.  Corp. CRAIN has one brother, Eugene CRAIN, Coxswain, in the navy in the Southwest Pacific.”

 


 

Fred Crain

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 14, 1945 – “As stated 2 weeks ago, Fred CRAIN, Coxswain, arrived here on May 27th to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ruben CRAIN and son, Carl, who recently received his discharge.  We have delayed this writeup in hopes that we could reproduce a picture of Fred, but we are informed that a picture will not be available until sometime next month.  Fred entered the navy on Jan. 7, 1943, and received his boot training at the Great Lakes Naval Station.  On Sept. 18, 1943, he shipped overseas landing on New Caledonia.  There he was assigned to the Amphibians, seeing service on the LCM’s, LCVP’s Ferry Barges.  From New Caledonia, he went to Gaudacanal, he went to Gaudacanal, then to Munda, New Georgia, and then to Manas Admiralty Islands.  He arrived back in the states on May 23 and will report back to the St. Louis Base on June 27th.  Fred wears the American Theater of Operations Ribbon and the Asiatic-Pacific with 2 stars representing the battle of Munda and the Battle of Bougainville.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 14, 1946 –“Fred CRAIN, Coxswain, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ruben CRAIN, of Meacham twp., arrived home Feb. 7 after receiving his discharge from the navy at Lambert Field, St. Louis.  Fred entered the service Jan. 7, 1943 and received his boot training at Great Lakes.  He shipped overseas Sept. 18, 1943 landing on New Caledonia.  Here he was assigned to the Amphibians, seeing service on the LCM’s, LCVP’s, and Ferry Barges at Guadalcanal, New Georgia and Admiralty Islands.  He arrived back in the states May 23 last, at which time he was granted a 30 day leave which was spent with his parents here.  He reported back for duty June 27 and again sailed to Manus and Saipan and finally to Tokyo.  He arrived back in the states a second time at San Francisco Dec. 31, where he was stationed until his start for home.  Fred wears the American Theater Ribbon and the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with 2 stars representing the Munda and Bougainville campaigns.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 24, 1953 – “DC3 Fred CRAIN, who is stationed at Long Beach, Calif., arrived Thursday for a 20 day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ruben CRAIN, and other relatives.”

 


 

Gene Crain

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 14, 1946 –“Meacham: Two of our boys made it home from the army and navy.  Freddie MISELBROOK and Gene CRAIN both have received discharges.”

 


 

Carroll Crosley

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 20, 1952 – “Pfc Carroll CROSLEY arrived Sunday from San Diego, Calif. to visit his wife and other relatives.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 27, 1953 – “Corporal Carroll L. CROSLEY left Camp Pendleton, Calif., with the 3rd Division of the Marines, for Japan where they will go to their various places in the far East. Mrs. CROSLEY and daughter arrived here Thursday from Oceanside, Calif., to visit the Claude HANNA and Harry CROSLEY families.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Charles Crutchfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 4, 1962 - “Marine Private Charles E. CRUTCHFIELD, son of Mrs. Arizona Crutchfield of Kinmundy completed 4 weeks of Individual Combat training at Camp Pendleton, Calif.”  (A photo was included with this article.)

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 20, 1964 – “Charles CRUTCHFIELD, in a letter addressed to his aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hampsten, states that he is now on duty in Okinawa with the U.S. Marines.  While doing a short duty in Japan, he was promoted to the rank of Corporal.  He will do a 13-month duty with the 3rd Battalion, the 3rd Marines at Camp Schwab, Okinawa.”

 

 

 

 

(V-364b) Charles Crutchfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 13, 1966 – “Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hampsten have received word from his nephew, Charles E. CRUTCHFIELD, that he has been promoted to Sgt., and is now stationed in Chu Lai, Viet Nam.  He wishes to think everyone for their cards and gifts he received during the Christmas holidays.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 9, 1965 – “Cpl. Charles E. CRUTCHFIELD is stationed in Viet Nam since Aug. 19th.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 10, 1966 – “Letter from Sgt. Charles CRUTCHFIELD Received the Same Day as Death Message” – “The following letter was received Tuesday, March 8 about noon by Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hampsten, from their nephew, Sgt. Charles CRUTCHFIELD: 

     March 3, 1966 - Dear Uncle Charlie & Aunt Lela; Hi – I do hope everybody is in the best of health by now.  I am doing just fine, a little tired.  We got back 28 Feb. after being gone 31 days in the field, and it was rough at times.  In our Co., we had 8 killed and about 30 wounded in that big operation we were on.  At times it fired real close but I came out OK.  My squad is the only one that haven’t lost anyone yet.  We are resting a little here in Chu Loi and we should be here a couple of months.  It is real hot and dry here.  We have our tents on the beach and the sand is real bad.  A person can’t buy too much of anything around here so I would like for you to send a few things.  I would like you to send it air mail and I will pay for everything, just let me know.  I would like six rolls of 135 Roto color x-prints film, and a box of big flashlight batteries, jet black Sheaffer ink cartridges for a ink pin, and a kool aid and something to eat.  Well that is about all for now.  I have taken a few pictures and when I get them back, I will send them to you.  Write when you can.  I do try and write as much as I can.  When we are out in the field, the mail might go out and it might not – never know.   Charles.

    A few minutes after reading the above letter, about 12:30, Mr. and Mrs. Hampsten received a phone call from a recruiting Sergeant from Centralia that Sgt. CRUTCHFIELD had been killed near Chu Loi in Viet Nam.  The officer arrived soon after in the Hampsten home and reported that Sgt. CRUTCHFIELD had lost his life March 5th, due to head, back and arm injuries.  Charles, who was 22, Jan. 13 of this year, had made his home with Mr. and MRs. Hampsten the past ten years.  He is also survived by his father, Ed, of Salem; mother, Mrs. Arizona Crutchfield; brother, Bill, and sisters, Judy and Glinda, Brush, Colo.”

 

 

 

 

(V-55) Charles Crutchfield

 


 

Harvey Curry

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 29, 1954 – “AC3 Harvey CURRY, who has recently returned from Korea, is visiting a few days with his grandmother, Mrs. Bertha CURRY, before reporting to Tinker Field, Okla.”

  


 

(V-478) Marvin Dace with his wife, Edith (Sullivan) Dace - taken in 1943

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 29, 1945 – “Shriver School: Marvin DACE, who is stationed in New York, and wife of Calif., visited over Thanksgiving with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Roy SULLIVAN and family.  Other guests were Mr. and Mrs. William DACE and family of Salem.”

 


 

Dwight Day

"The Kinmundy Express" - March 30, 1944 - "The first letter this week was received from Dwight DAY, RM3 c, who is looking over the grass skirts of Honolulu. He says: Have been neglecting to let you know how much I appreciate receiving the paper, so will attempt to do so now. Although it has been 2 months since I received it due to moving so much. Received the back issues from my parents this morning and enjoyed them very much. The scenery here as a whole is very beautiful. Honolulu is not so much different than any other city except every other store is a curio shop or an amusement house to catch the service man’s eye, which consists mainly of sailors. Will close thanking you again for the paper."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 27, 1945 – “Miss Kathleen BROWN, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E.E. BROWN, of this city, became the bride of Dwight C. DAY of Alma on Dec. 21, by the pastor of the local Methodist Church before the fireplace in the bride’s home.  The groom is home on leave after serving 16 months on Guam.  The attendants were Miss Virginia BROWN, sister of the bride, and Ralph DAY, brother of the groom.  Both the bride and groom are graduates of our local high school, Mrs. DAY with the class of 1944, and since then has been employed by Bell Telephone Co. in Salem, and the groom graduated with the class o 1942 and then enlisted in the Navy.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 10, 1952 – “Mr. and Mrs. Dwight DAY Jr. and son, Johnnie returned home Saturday night from Bainbridge Island, Washington. He has received his release from active duty in the Navy. On their way home, they visited relatives in California, and the wonders of Grand Canyon.”

 


 

Ralph Day

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 18, 1945 – “1st Lt. Ralph DAY, wife and daughter, arrived in Alma Oct. 8th to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Dwight DAY.   Lt. DAY is home on Terminal Leave and will receive his discharge Nov. 15th.  Ralph entered the service in July 1942 and took his basic training in the Infantry.  After his basic, he was selected for Officers’ Candidate School and was commissioned in April 1948.  On Dec. 31, 1948, he was transferred to the Air Corps and received his wings in Sept. 1944.  In April 1945, just as he was ready to ship overseas, he was promoted to First Lieutenant.  His group was split up then and he, nor several of his buddies, had the privilege of flying over foreign soil.  After receiving his discharge, Ralph intends to go to Alabama where he will seek employment.”

 


 

  

(V-62)                                                                 Lowell Ivan DeVore                                                (V-63)

               


 

Charles DeWeese

"The Kinmundy Express" - Dec. 9, 1943

"Here’s one from Pvt. Charles DeWEESE, a former Alma lad, who can’t tell us just where he is. But by putting everything together, we would say that he was on one of those undiscovered islands in the northwest Pacific. He says: I have been for quite some time intending to write you, and let you know that I receive my paper pretty regular. I want to thank you for it. I really do appreciate it very much to get the news from home, after being out here where news are scarce, although some of them are late in reaching me, it is good to get them. I am sorry that I can’t tell you where I am at as that is strictly against regulations in some areas and this happens to be one of them. As there is not much here to write bout. It would be hard to write about it and keep within the rules. I have been here in complete isolation for the past 18 months. The weather here some times gets pretty rough. I think they call it the roughest in the world and I am beginning to believe it. There is no civilization at all about as remote as it could get so you can kind of get the idea of what I have here. This may not seem much but it’s about the extent of my description of what it’s like. I’d like very much to get back to Marion county for awhile, but that is hardly possible yet for awhile as we have quite a job to do yet. I also want to take this opportunity to thank the Kinmundy Chamber of Commerce for the cigarettes and send all of my friends my best regards and wishing them all the boys a speedy return."

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Sept. 7, 1944

"Here’s a nice letter from Tec. 5, Chas. DeWEESE, who is at present in the Aleutian Islands. He says: It’s been quite a long while since I last wrote you, so will attempt to write a line or two. It may not be much as news is pretty scarce out this way, but I will let you know that I receive my paper regular and want to thank those responsible for it. It is appreciated very much by all the boys. I suppose it is needless to try to tell you about this part of the country. Most everyone knows all about it and the weather. I think some of the boys from there have experienced it. I have been out here for 27 months and I think there is more coming, just how much I don’t know. I am hoping to get out of here pretty soon, for I think I’ve been out of circulation long enough. (It’s really out too). I am ready any time for a boat ride. (Ha). I read all the boys letters. It is good to see where they are at and what’s going on with them. There have been a few who have been so fortunate having a pretty tough time. They are doing a first class job of cleaning out over there and if it keeps up they may all be home before too long. Anyway, I wish them all the best. I hear it has been pretty dry back there. You should of had some of the rain we have had. There has been a lot of it. I’ve seen all kinds of weather in one day, leaving out only the warm I guess. I haven’t had any summer since the year I entered the service. That was in ‘41. I guess they still have it back there, don’t they? But so far, I have fared pretty well. I’ll have to say so-long now. Here’s regards to everyone back there and I hope to be seeing you soon. Thanks again for the paper."

 


 

Robert Disbrow

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 21, 1969 – “Lt. Robert DISBROW is assigned to the 1st Infantry Division in Vietnam.  He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Disbrow of Decatur.  His wife, the former Kaye George, of Kinmundy, is teaching 3rd grade at Excelsior South Grade School in Decatur.”

 


 

 

(V-245b) Beryl Diss 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 26, 1945 – “Sgt. Beryl DISS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Orville DISS, arrived home Monday morning to spend a 30 day furlough with his wife and son and parents.  Sgt. DISS entered the service Nov. 11, 1942, and shipped overseas Oct. 5, 1944, landing in France.  From there he went to Luxembourg, then into Germany, and then into Austria.  He served with the 5th Division, 5th Quartermaster Corps.  He landed back in the states on July 19.  After spending his furlough here, he will report back to Camp Grant and then be sent to Camp Campbell for further training.  Sgt. DISS wears the Good Conduct Medal, the European Theater of Operations Ribbon with 3 stars representing the battles East of the Rhine, West of the Rhine, and Vosges Mountains.  He also wears the unit citation for meritorious service and the Leader in Combat Ribbon.  On May 10, 1944, he was married to Miss Eileen BRUBAKER of Salem.  They have a 4 month old son, Danny Joe.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 18, 1945 – “Sgt. Beryl DISS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Orville DISS, returning home Tuesday morning after receiving his discharge at Camp Campbell, Ky., the day previous.   Sgt. DISS spent almost 3 years in the army, and 9 months of this time was spent in the European Theater.  He landed back in the states July 19th and arrived home on the 22nd for a furlough with his parents and his wife and son.  Since the expiration of his furlough, he has been traveling back and forth to Kentucky.  Sgt. DISS and his family have taken rooms with Mrs. Florence CONANT.  He will return to his old job in Salem.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

(V-218) Charles Diss 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Sept. 28, 1944 - "Here’s a nice letter from Pvt. Charles DISS, who is in France, and from the way he writes, this country must be very interesting. He says: Hello there and how is everything going? Just fine I suppose. I have been on the go and haven’t done very much writing and I haven’t received any paper since I left the good old U.S.A. But they should be catching up with me now as we are settled for awhile and I do mean settled. We moved into a big old hotel yesterday and it is really nice. There are 2 of us to a room, with nice double beds, well, everything that a hotel has but running water and maids. But they say on up at Paris, they even have that. It is certainly different than we have been having. The French people are very different than what the English were. I walked down through town this morning and almost all of them have come back now and are fixing up their houses. We find a few who speak English, but as for most of them, we have to use sign language. That is a rather slow procedure when a fellow sees a nice girl and wants to get acquainted. But we usually manage, somehow. There are lots of very nice looking girls, but I still say there isn’t any like back in the states. As soon as we can go on up and take care of a certain guy and his gang, I’ll be ready to come back to good old Kinmundy. So I guess this is about all for now and I have to clean our room up so until next time. So long for now. P.S. This hotel was very recently occupied by some guys who left in a hurry to go toward home."

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Nov. 16, 1944 - "Here’s a nice letter from Pvt. Charles DISS, who is now in Belgium. He sends us some of the money from that country, as well as Holland, which we have added to our collection of foreign currency. He says: Just a few lines this morning to say ‘hello’ and also send you a couple of pieces of this money that we are using over here. This Belgium money is very much the same as French money. The ten francs is worth approximately 22 cents of our money. The other piece of money is some I got when I was over in Holland and is worth about 40 cents but is called 100 cents in their money. The Dutch also have a silver dollar almost the same as ours which, is also called 100 pennies, but which is worth only 40 pennies in our money. We thought at first in England when we were using shillings that they were very hard to get accustomed to. I believe that the French money was the easiest of them all to use. As for windmills and wooden shoes, I didn’t see any sign of them at all while I was in Holland. A great many of the French people and these Belgium people wear wooden shoes. They really look clumsy but the people seem to walk along very nicely in them. I think the people are far more advanced in every way here in Belgium than they were in France and England. A person can walk down the street in any one of these large cities and can see almost anything that would be seen on the main streets of Boston, even to the ice cream parlors. We got our first ice cream here that we have had since we left the States. It really hit the spot too. I was also saw Luxembourg one day and that is really a beautiful country. They have a great many pine forests there and the country is all hilly which adds to the scenery. The people farm almost every inch of the land that is not in pine trees. Another thing that sounded nice to us while we were in Holland was the greeting they gave us. They all, even the little kids, said hello to us instead of the English version which was, "Any Gum, Chum", and the French all said ‘Bonjour’ which means hello. We also see a lot of the popular made cars around here which we never saw in France. Also another that was nice to see was a Cocoa Cola sign as we were going thru a very large town. But as yet, we haven’t been able to get one. Well, I guess this is about all for now, so until the next time, bye now."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 7, 1945 – “Pvt. Charles DISS’ Unit Receives Award of Meritorious Service Unit Plaque in Germany: On May 8, the award of Meritorious Service Unit Plaque, was made to the Service Battery, 751st Field Artillery Battalion for Superior Execution of duty in the performance of exceptionally difficult tasks.  From 22 January to 31 March 1945, the Service Battery, 751st Field Artillery Battalion rendered meritorious service in the accomplishment of it’s numerous duties on the continent.  Throughout this period, this unit achieved and maintained a high standard of discipline and demonstrated superior performance in every duty it was assigned.  The conduct of the 751st Field Artillery Battalion is in keeping with the high traditions of the military service.  PFC Charles DISS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Orville DISS, is a member of this unit and when he returns home, you will see him wearing a Gold Wreath on his right sleeve.”

 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 7, 1946 –“PFC Charles DISS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Orville DISS, arrived home Jan. 30, after receiving his discharge at Camp Grant that same day.  Charles entered the service in Nov. 1943, and shipped overseas July 23, 1944, landing in Scotland.  From there he went to France, Belgium, Germany, Luxembourg, Holland, and then back into Germany.  He sailed from LaHarve Jan. 12 and landed in New York Jan. 23.  PFC DISS wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon and the European Theater Ribbon with 4 stars representing the campaigns of northern France, Ardennes, Rhineland, and Central Europe.  He was also awarded the Meritorious Plaque.  He came home with the 84th Division.  As to his future, Charles says he is undecided, but the first thing he is going to do is just enjoy a good vacation.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 7, 1946 –“A dinner was held Feb. 3 in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Orville DISS honoring their son, PFC Charles, who had just returned home from Germany.  It had been 21 months since he left Kinmundy.  35 relatives came with well filled baskets.  It was also the wedding anniversary of Orville and Bessie.  A list of those attending was included.”

 


 

Jack D. Diss - “The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 8, 1953 – “Sgt. Jack DISS Gets Bronze Star Award: Sgt. Jack D. DISS, son of Mr. and Mrs. L.M. DISS of Hooper, Colo., was awarded the Bronze Star medal by direction of the President. A member of the 2nd Engineer combat battalion, 2nd infantry division, he distinguished himself by heroism in action on Oct. 2, 1952 in the vicinity of Chorwon, North Korea. On that date, Sgt. DISS was serving as assistant platoon sergeant with a platoon engaged in the tasks of improving the defenses of Arsenal Hill. He was supervising the laying of a barbed wire obstacle in front of the friendly position and within 100 yards of the enemy positions, when the enemy suddenly unleashed a barrage of mortar fire upon the work detail seriously wounding the 4 men with him. Sgt. DISS with complete disregard for personal safety, remained in the open with his wounded men giving such aid and comfort as possible and refusing to take cover of any sort until the last man was removed to safety. Realizing the importance of the mission, he returned that same night, under bright moonlight, and completed erection of the obstacle. (From the Center, Colo. Post-Dispatch.)”

  


 

Darrell D. Diss

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 5, 1953 – “Kinmundy Express Found on Sale in News Stand in Korea by Darrell Diss: Jan. 27, 1953, Tuesday night 9 p.m.: Dear Mr. and Mrs. VALLOW, Seven miles east of Seoul, Korea is the little boy who used to stop in at the printing office when school was out on Thursday of each week and ask for the Kinmundy paper. I sure do miss that. What I wouldn’t give to be there right now where I could see good old Kinmundy anyway. I have been intending to write sooner but I wanted to wait until I received all my Christmas cards then write a thank you note at the same time. Well I think I have them all now. I received the last one Jan. 15th, I do believe. I think I did pretty good. I received a total of 63 Christmas cards. So I want to thank everyone who sent the nice cards. It sure does mean a lot especially over here in this God forsaken land. As I am the Unit Mail Clerk for the AG Office, I always get my mail first. It sure is good to finger through the letters and see Darrell D. DISS on one of them. It makes you think that you are more important than the Commanding General, and he does get the bigger share of the mail. I might tell you a little about my last journey over here. I left the states Sept. 20, 1952, and landed in Inchon, Korea Oct. 5, 1952. In 8 hours, I was at my destination which was 14 miles away. So you see I had a nice long trip by the Korean Fast Express. It reminds me of old Local IC No. 25. I am stationed 7 miles East of Seoul at the Rear Compound of the 45th Infantry Division. I have a very nice job in the Adjutant General Section. Just about like a Civilian Section. Just about like a Civilian job, except you don’t have any very close friendly neighbors around. The food is very good considering Army Cooking. We have three hot meals daily. The only thing I don’t like about is that we sleep in tents, with a little old pot-belly stove, and all is rationed, so there is not many times that we are very warm. I really consider myself lucky though not to be up at the front lines. Back here I have been on two patrols so far, and have only had three small raids so I am lucky. Another thing is you can’t eat a meal without the fence being lined with little Korean children and Mamasons screaming their heads off "Hello Chop Chop". All the garbage we throw away they eat. It is really awful. It makes you realize why we are fighting in Korea. I sure would hate for our country to be in this shape. Well I am going to close this for now. I just wanted your to put a little letter of thanks in the paper for me and also thank you for the Kinmundy paper. Not many people have heard of Kinmundy, but they all read the Zatso, so the Kinmundy paper is becoming quite popular over here. Oh yes, by the way, whenever I get through with the paper, I always throw it way. Well we have Koreans who burn all the trash and whenever they find magazines, papers, cigarettes, and candy boxes, they always salvage them. I was walking the other the streets of Seoul last Sunday and I stopped at one of their swanky newsstands, and I was reading the sign. It said, you can get all your hometown newspapers here. I was looking through the pile, and by golly they had the copy of the Kinmundy Express for sale. So me feeling sorry for them I bought it for 1000 Won, which is 16 cents in Military Script. So this time I tore it up to make sure that no one else bought it. I sure didn’t know they sold them or I would have torn them up the first time. The Captain told me that is a good lesson to learn that we should always tear up our Secret Material or they will salvage it. So it is really a small world when you read your paper, throw it away and then buy it back again just to tear up.

Thanks again for the Christmas cards and keeping the Kinmundy Express rolling.

      As ever, Darrell D. DISS.

P.S. I talked to George LAMBIRD last night by phone. Quite a surprise to both of us. We are only 16 miles apart.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 26, 1953 – “Captain Pfc. Darrell DISS, who is stationed in Yongdongpo, Korea, went to Pusan, Korea, March 17, and ate lunch with Pvt. Bob GEILER and Pvt. Charles BLOMBERG. This is the first time Pvt. DISS has had the opportunity of seeing a fellow Kinmundian since being sent overseas although he has talked via telephone to George LAMBIRD who is stationed at Seoul.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 27, 1953 – “Cpl. and Mrs. Darrell DISS and son of Camp Atterbury, Ind. spent the weekend here with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lowell DISS and family.”

  


 

(V-149) Darren Diss

 


 

John H. Diss

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 5, 1967 – “Army Private John H. DISS, 22, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.H. Diss, Kinmundy, completed a still picture photographer course Sept. 22 at the Army Signal School, Ft. Monmouth, N.J.”

 


 

Lowell Diss, Jr.

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 20, 1949 – “Lowell Junior DISS, 19, EM, FA, U.S. Navy, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lowell DISS, has graduated from the Electrician Mate School, U.S. Naval Training Center at San Diego, Cal.  Junior rated second highest of his class with an average of 86.67.  He entered navy service Dec. 16, 1948 at Mt. Vernon, Ill.  He has now been assigned to an oil tanker USS Canister 99 at Norfolk, Virginia.  He will sail for Naples, Italy on Oct. 28.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 4, 1951 – “Junior DISS, EM3C, arrived home Wednesday on a 14 day furlough.  He is visiting his wife and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lowell DISS.”   

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 16, 1952 – “Word has been received by Mr. and Mrs. Lowell DISS, that their son, Pvt. Darrell DISS, has arrived in Korea.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 11, 1952 – “Lowell DISS, Jr. EM 2c, who for the past 4 years, has been serving in the U.S. Navy, arrived in Norfolk, Va., Dec. 5th, where he received his discharge. He arrived in Kinmundy Dec. 6. Mr. DISS and his wife now reside in Salem.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-30a) Benny and Pauline Doolen on their wedding day - Aug. 29, 1943

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 17, 1946 –“Bennie DOOLEN, Aviation Metalsmith 2nd class, wife and son, Stephen Carl, arrived here last Friday and are now at home with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. R. DOOLEN, of this city, and Mr. and Mrs. Dwight PURCELL, of Alma.  Bennie entered the navy Oct. 1, 1942, and received his boot training at Great Lakes.  He was then sent to Seattle, Wash., then to Carvallis, Ore., then to Bend, Ore., and then back to Seattle.  Here he remained until receiving his discharge on Dec. 10 at Puget Sound Navy Yards, Bremerton, Wash.  On Aug. 29, 1943, he married Miss Pauline PURCELL of Alma.   As to his future, Bennie says he has traveled from the east to west coast and the best place he has seen yet is Kinmundy.  And so now it is his intention to go into business with his father.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Robert H. Donoho

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 28, 1965 –“Aviation Electrician’s Mate Airman Robert H. DONOHO, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Donoho of Alma, is participating in the U.S. First Fleet’s training exercise Nov. 18-24 while serving with Patrol Squadron 19.  His squadron files aerial reconnaissance and ship surveillance missions.”

 

 “The Kinmundy Express” – May 9, 1968 – “Aviation Electrician’s Mate Second Class Robert F. DONOHO, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick A. Donoho of Alma, and husband of the former Miss Myra J. Becktell of Salem, participlated in the celebration of Helicopter Attack Squadron Three’s 1st anniversary of Vung Tau Airfield, Vietnam.  The squadron, better known as “Seawolves”, provides support for the River Patrol Boats and Sea Air Land units.  Together they prevent the enemy from moving men and supplies by water in the Mekong Delta.  The squadron also patrols and protect the main shipping channels of the Run Sat Special Zone leading to Saigon.  The “Seawolves” secondary mission is to provide cover for troop convoy  or ship movement, gunfire spotting for Army and Navy artillery or Navy ships, and medical evacuations.  The squadron is the first known aviation organization to be commissioned in a war zone.”

 


 

Arthur Doolen

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 27, 1951 – “Mrs. Myrtle DOOLEN has received word that her son, Capt. Arthur DOOLEN, who has been a patient at the Fort Riley, Kansas hospital for 17 weeks, has been moved to the Fitz Simmons Hospital in Denver, Colo.  Capt. DOOLEN is suffering from a blood clot in his leg.”    

 


 

 

 

 

(V-310) Carl G. Doolen

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 2, 1945 – “Somewhere in the Netherlands East Indies - M. Sgt. Carl G. DOOLEN, son of Mr. and Mrs. G.C. DOOLEN, Kinmundy, is now assigned as sergeant major at the 27th General Hospital, one of the largest and busiest general hospitals in Dutch New Guinea, handling battle casualties from the Philippines and other combat areas.  The current daily average of patients in the hospital in which Sgt. DOOLEN is now on duty is over 2000 although it was originally organized for 1500 patients.  A total of 18,000 patients have been handled by the hospital.  Sgt. DOOLEN, a graduate of Kinmundy High School and Brown’s Business College, Centralia, entered the army in Jan. 1942, and received basic training at Fort Riley, Kan.  Overseas since Jan. 1944, Sgt. DOOLEN was employed by the Adams Oil and Gas Co. in Centralia before entering the Army.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 17, 1946 –“Sgt. Carl DOOLEN, son of Mr. and Mrs. G.C. DOOLEN, arrived home New Year’s Day after receiving his discharge at Jefferson Barracks the day previous.  Carl entered the service Jan. 14, 1942, and shipped overseas Jan. 5, 194__, landing in Australia.  From there he went to New Guinea and then to the Philippines.  He landed back in the U.S.A., Dec. 21.  Sgt. DOOLEN wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon, the American Theater Ribbon, the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with 1 star representing the New Guinea Campaign, the Philippine Liberation Ribbon and a Bronze star awarded for Meritorious Service in Hollandla, New Guinea.  In all probability, Carl will resume his duties his duties with the Shell Oil Co. in Centralia.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 24, 1946 –“A picture was printed of Sgt. Carl G. DOOLEN, son of Mr. and Mrs. G.C. DOOLEN, who arrived home New Year’s Day after serving 2 years in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater.”

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-197) Charles L. "Tog" Doolen - 1944

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 18, 1945 – “Charles DOOLEN, ARM3c, arrived here Monday to spend a 30 day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.R. DOOLEN.  He landed in the states Oct. 8th.  He has been flying from the carrier, USS Anzio and has been to China, Japan and Korea.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 22, 1945 – “Charles L. DOOLEN, ARM3c, left last Wednesday for St. Louis after spending a leave here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.R. DOOLEN and daughter, Lela Mae.  He was assigned to the Seattle Navy Air Base, the same base where his brother, Benny, is stationed.  Naturally, he looked up Benny upon his arrival there and this was the first reunion of these brothers for 3 years.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

Earl W. Doolen

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 24, 1946 –“T5 Earl W. DOOLEN received his discharge Jan. 4 at Jefferson Barracks, Mo.  Earl entered the service on Aug. 25, 1944, at Ft. Sheridan, and received his basic training at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo, and was attached to the 1758th Engr. Base Depot as a Supply Clerk.  He was shipped overseas Aug. 30, landing on Saipan.  He started home Dec. 11, landing at Santa Ana, Calif., Dec. 24th.  T5 DOOLEN wears the Good Conduct Medal, the American Theater Ribbon, the Victory Ribbon and the Asiatic-Ribbon.  Prior to entering the service he was employed at the Dodge Chicago Plant Division of Chrysler Corp.  He is now home with his family and in the near future intends to go to school.”

 

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 31, 1946 –“A picture was printed of T5 Earl W. DOOLEN, who was discharged Jan. 4, after seeing service on Saipan.  He is now at home here with his wife and children.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Frank Doolen

(V-3) Frank Doolen

 

 

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois - Jan. 16, 1919

France, Dec. 20, 1918

 

Dear Dad,

 We arrived at Aix Le Bains this evening and so far have found it to be a swell place.  It is located east of Lyons if you want to locate it on the map.  We left Pont Mousson Wednesday morning and went over to Nancy where we staid until yesterday evening.  Got a good bath and what clean clothes needed there.  One of the finest bath rooms and pool I have ever seen. Sure was swell.  The Y.M.C.A. has charge of it.  They took us to hotels when we got there.  Have a swell soft bed.   Don’t know how I will be able to sleep in it but it sure looks fine.  Most of the entertainment here is furnished by the Y.  I think I told you I was going on my seven days leave.  Well the seven days didn’t start until we arrived here so the time coming and going don’t count.   That will mean almost two weeks away from the Battery.  I thought I was lucky to be among the first fifteen to get to go on leave.  Only fifteen can go at a time that is out of each Battery.  There sure is some fine natural scenery thru this country.  The mountain scenery is great, or at least I think so.  Am not sure but think it is part of the Alp mts.  Can tell you more about it next time as I haven’t been around any yet.  Just came over to the Y.M.C.A.  Sure have a swell Y.  We had a good supper at the hotel.  I didn’t know what part of it was but it was good just the same.  This trip is free.  All expenses are paid.  Of course, there is plenty one can spend his money for but all necessary expenses are paid.   Train fare and hotel bills.  How are all the folks?  I was about to forget to ask.  I am alright and hope every one at home is.  Don’t know when I will ever get home but we don’t want to think of that to soon.  Don’t expect me until you see me coming because it may be some time before I get there.  This is about all I have to say tonight, must go try my bed as I am a little tired after being on the train for about twenty-four hours.  These trains aren’t so comfortable as ours in the States.  We didn’t have a birth.

Your son,  Pvt. B.F. DOOLEN

 

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois – April 24, 1919

Frank DOOLEN arrived home from Camp Custer Wednesday night whither he had been sent for demobilization upon his arrival from overseas where he had been serving for the past eight months.  Frank had some actual fighting and has some interesting experiences to relate.  We need not say we are glad to welcome home this another one of our heroes.

 


 

Garrold Doolen

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 24, 1960 - “Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Doolen have received word that their son, Gerald, is now stationed at Fort Hood, Texas.”

 


 

John G. Doolen

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 28, 1962 - “Ens. John G. DOOLEN, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert L. DOOLEN of Kinmundy, was graduated June 8, at the Naval Schools Command, Newport, R.I.”

 


 

Ronald Doolen

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 18, 1959 – “PFC Ronald DOOLEN of Ft. Gordon, Ga. called several times last week on his grandmother, Mrs. Lora BAYLIS.  After completion of his furlough, he will go to Ft. Dix, N.J. from where he will be sent to France for duty.”

 


(V-393) Roy Doolen with Lela Mae (Nichols) Doolen

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Feb. 17, 1944 - "Here’s a letter from Lt. Roy DOOLEN, who is now seeing the sights through the fog of merry old England. He says: Years ago I would never have dreamed that The Kinmundy Express would have world wide distribution. But it has just that. Mine is getting over here at varied intervals. I never know which week’s paper to expect next. However, I enjoy them immensely and wish to express my appreciation for it. Even though the news is a month and a half old, it doesn’t seem that way to me. I can keep up with the hometown’s progress week by week. For the past couple of months I have been roaming around the little island called England. The whole country has basically the same typography, which is small rolling hills covered with grass or small grain. There are few trees in most parts. The fields are in 5 to 10 acre plots with a hedge fence. It is very pretty when the sun is shining. From above it looks like a pretty patchwork quilt. The people are as friendly as one could expect, when there are so many soldiers around. When you read about blackouts and fogs, they are not exaggerating a bit. I certainly never saw anything so dark as it can get here. Last week was notable for 2 things: I got my laundry back, which is a rarity over here; and the sun shone 1 day, an even greater rarity. At present I am going to school, a never ending process in the army. In another week I will be through and go back to living in the field again. I have no idea where my outfit is at present but will be able to contact them through our base camp. Then I will take my map in hand, catch up with the outfit and go back to my duties as Motor and Executive Officer of my troop. Well this is enough for the present. Keep the paper coming and thanks a lot."

 

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Oct. 12, 1944 - "1st Lieutenant Roy G. DOOLEN writes: Never before in my life have I put so much work into such a short period of time, as I have in the last couple of months. My outfit has led this race, for Germany such as no outfit but the calvary can do. It has cost many lives, and as I look at the pretty green pine forests concealing the famed ‘Siegfreid Line", I realize it will cost many more lives to go on through to Berlin. But the American Army has pushed forward with such spirit that German troops turn and flee at the sign of them. On their own soil however, the German are a little tougher. My outfit got quite a writeup over here for being the first Americans in Paris. The city is very beautiful and gay in spite of the war. I could write many pages on the interesting things that have happed to me so far, but the same things are happening to thousands of other soldiers. The complete story will come out when we all get home and spin our yards in the old barber shop or on the street corner. I hope that won’t be too long. Your paper hasn’t caught up with me for quite a while. I sure miss it. It keeps me up to date on the home front. Here’s hoping it catches up with me soon. Best of luck to all at home."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 7, 1945 – “Mr. and Mrs. G.C. DOOLEN have received word from their son, Roy, stating that he was promoted to the rank of Captain in the Calvary, on 16 May.  He is with the Third Army in Germany.”

 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 30, 1945 – “The Bronze Star Medal is awarded to Capt. Roy G. DOOLEN, Cavalry, 102nd Cav. group mecz, United States Army for meritorious achievement in connection with military operations from 13 June 1944 to 8 May 1945 in France, Belgium, Luxembourg, and Germany.  As assistant S-2 and Liaison Officer, Capt. DOOLEN (then 1st Lieut.) Showed great devotion to duty, diligence and thorough application in all assignments.  His voluntary undertaking and efficient performance of duties far in excess of those required of him assisted materially in the combat operations of his unit.  Capt. DOOLEN’s achievement deserve unqualified praise.”  Capt. DOOLEN entered military service from Illinois, Jan. 13, 1942, has been overseas since Nov. 4, 1943.  His wife, Lela M. DOOLEN who resides near Alma, just received the word that this award was made Aug. 13, 1945 at Dobrany, Czechoslovakia.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 1, 1945 – “Capt. Roy DOOLEN arrived home last Saturday to again be with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Cleve DOOLEN and his wife, the former Lela Mae NICHOLS.  He is home on Terminal leave and after the expiration of this leave, will receive his discharge.  Roy entered the service in January 1942.  After taking his basic training and attending Officers’ Candidate School at Ft. Riley, Kansas, was commissioned 2nd Lieut.  In October 1942.  He was later promoted to 1st Lieut. In October 1942.  He was later promoted to 1st Lieutenant at Camp Maxey, Texas, in Sept. 1943.  He shipped overseas in November 1943, landing in England, where he was stationed until the invasion of France.  He went into Normandy on D-Day plus 6.  From there he went to Northern France, then to Belgium, Germany and then into Czechoslovakia.  Here in May 1945, he was promoted to Captain.  Here also in May, he was awarded the Bronze Star for Meritorious Service.  He sailed for the states on Oct. 14th, from LaHarve, France, landing in Boston on Oct. 21st.  Capt. DOOLEN wears the Good Conduct Medal and the European Theater of Operations Ribbon with 6 stars, representing the campaigns of Normandy, Northern France, Belgium, Rhineland, Ardennes, and Central Europe.  Capt. DOOLEN was attached to the 102nd Cavalry Division.  He says his plans are indefinite for the present.  Anyway, we are all glad to welcome Capt. DOOLEN home again.”

 


 

Walter Doolen

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 4, 1946 –“Capt. Walter DOOLEN, son of Mr. and Mrs. E.W. DOOLEN, received his discharge at Jefferson Barracks March 28th.  He was met there by his wife and they came to Kinmundy Saturday evening to spend a few days with homefolks.  Walter entered the service May 7, 1942, and received his basic at Ft. Warren, Wyo.  From there he was sent to O.C.S. at Camp Lee, Va., and received his commission July 2, 1943.  He shipped overseas Oct. 2, 1943, landing in Scotland.  From there he went to England, then to Italy, France and Germany.  He was advanced to the rank of 1st Lieutenant in Feb. 1944 while in England, and to the rank of Captain in Oct. 1945 while in France.  He was attached to the Army Air Force Re-enforcement Depot.  He started home on March 12, landing in New York March 23rd.  Mr. and Mrs. DOOLEN will return to their home in Macomb, Ill. within a few days, where Mr. DOOLEN will resume his duties as managers of the Woolworth Store in that city.”

 


 

Wesley Doolen

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Apr. 16, 1953 – “Wesley DOOLEN and Carl LANE left Monday for St. Louis to report for the Army. They were accompanied by Don FRALA of Alma who reported to the Air Force. Wesley and Carl will be stationed at Fort Custer, Mich., and Don will be at Lackland Air Base, Texas.”

 

  “The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 24, 1953 – “Pvt. Wesley DOOLEN, Ft. Benning, Ga., and Ronald DOOLEN, Paducah, Ky., came Sunday to visit the former’s wife, Betty, and daughter of Odin, and grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. A.J. BAYLIS.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 15, 1954 – “Pfc. Wesley DOOLEN left July 7 to return to his base in Germany.” 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 6, 1955 – “Pfc Wesley DOOLEN, who has been hospitalized in Lumstrum, Germany, since Aug. arrived in Odin Christmas Day for a furlough with his wife and daughter.  They visited relatives at the home of Mrs. A.J. BAYLIS, Sunday.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Apr. 28, 1955 – “Wesley DOOLEN, formerly of Kinmundy, received a medical discharge from the Air Force, March 31.  He is now at home in Odin.” 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Lester Dorr

 

Lester Dorr - “The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois – March 13, 1919 - “The Alma News” section

      A telegram from the War Department was received last Saturday by Mrs. Eunice AUSTIN, telling of the death of her son, Lester DORR, who died from bronchial pneumonia, while with the A.E. F. in France.  It is an irony of fate that he should have passed thru several battles without a scratch and then died of disease on February 12.  He had been expected home sometime and this announcement of his death came as a blow to his mother, who has the sympathy of the entire community.

 


 

Carl R. Doudera

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 15, 1961 - “Army PFC Carl R. DOUDERA, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Doudera, Alma, recently was assigned to the U.S. Army Signal Missile Support Agency at White Sands Missile Range, N.M.  A radio repairman in the agency’s Communications Division, he entered the Army in Feb. 1960, completed basic training at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo., and was last stationed at Fort Monmouth, N.J.  The 22 year old soldier is a 1956 graduate of Kinmundy High School and was employed by the Sherman Drilling Co. in Dubois.”

 


 

(V-412) John Doudera and Joseph Doudera (WWI)

 


(V-472) Kenneth Doudera  (1953)

 


 

(V-413) Louie Doudera

 


(V-414) Richard Doudera

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Joseph Downs

 

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – July 25, 1918;

Mrs. Mattie DOWNS, Kinmundy, Ill.

Dear Mother,

            Long before this, you have received the sad news of the death of your brave and loyal son, Joseph, who died at the hospital from gas received the morning of May 27th.  Mother, you are to be proud as your son died as all good soldiers should – with his face to the enemy even after being seriously gassed did he falter.  We buried him in the little cemetery on the hill beside his comrades where he sleeps tonight as the little stream below flows on toward the sea.

            If there is anything I can do, you only have to write me.  All his personal things will be sent you by the government war officials.

            Assuring you of our deepest sympathy in your loss.  I am, sincerely yours,

            Winfred E. ROBB; Chaplain 168th Inf. 

 

 

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois – Feb. 6, 1919

“Praises Work of Kinmundy Woman” - Jan. 25, 1919

 

People of Kinmundy, Illinois: 

I returned to the U.S.A. on the U.S. Huron, an old German boat, Frederick the Great, the one that the Kaiser made the trip around the world on in 1907.  On our trip home, we had the sad experience of getting into a storm with a 120 mile gale lasting for 24 hours and the constant rolling of the ship was very tiresome and made many sick.  During the night when the store was at its worst the ship rolled 51 degrees.  Of course not being real seamen, you may have some idea what we all thought.

We landed at Newport News, Va. Jan. 18, and the Red Cross and the Hospital certainly made us feel at home and at the hospital here, the Red Cross have wonderful community houses for the returned soldiers and while visiting there I had the pleasure of meeting Miss RUTHERFORD of your town and she certainly is a grand lady to be among the boys for she’s a regular mother to us all.  When she learned I was from the Rainbow Division we had many things to talk about and the first thing she asked me was, “Do you know Joseph DOWNS?” and she was very surprised when I knew him so well.  Up until the time that Joe was killed, most of my meals in France were cooked by him and I might say that my Xmas and New Years dinners a year ago were cooked by Joe and if we had been at home it couldn’t have been better.  Joe certainly was well liked by the boys of his company and had a great many friends through the Regiment for he was always up and doing.

The 42nd (Rainbow Division) was in the trenches for four months straight on the Lorraine front and during our stay there we had several scraps with Fritz and at midnight on May 27, the Germans sent over several hundred large gas shells in the area where our advanced dressing station and kitchens were located and you would not wonder why men die from this gas if you could see how it turned the grass and trees yellow at this place.  From this dressing station we sent two hundred and seventy-five to the hospital who were gassed; several died on the road and many others after they arrived and Joe DOWNS was among them.  A boy who sacrificed all he had, his life.  One of his friends was killed and his captain badly gassed at the same time. Words cannot describe a gas attack or any other kind of battle so I won't attempt it.

We have a Victrolia in our Ward that was bought by the people of Kinmundy and we sure enjoy it.  Nothing like that at the front, our only music there was the whizzing and busting of shells.  We had two regiment of Artillery 75 M in our Division - one from Minnesota and one from Illinois and when the Doughboys had them behind them in a drive they were satisfied and if they can't make the Huns retreat, no one can.

Sgt. Carl W. ASCHEN; 168th Inf., 42nd Div.; Winterset, Iowa

 


 

(V-150) Dustin Duncan

 


 

Michael L. Durham

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 10, 1964 –“Michael L. DURHAM, 19, son of Mr. and Mrs. George O. Durham of Alma, recently completed basic training at the Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 7, 1965 –“Airman Apprentice Michael L. DURHAM, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. George O. Durham of Alma, graduated Dec. 17 from the Aviation Machinist Mate Reciprocating School at the Naval Air Technical Training Center, Memphis, Tenn.” 

 


 

Lawrence R. "Bud" Dyer - "The Kinmundy Express” – April 8, 1954 – “Lawrence R. “Bud” DYER, 22, son of Mr. and Mrs. John N. DYER, was recently promoted to Sergeant while serving with the 306th Engineer Dump Truck Co. in Korea.  He is a platoon leader in the company which hauls bulk materials for construction projects of the 32nd Engineer Group.  Overseas since March 1953, he entered the army Sept. 1952, and completed basic training at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo.  In civilian life, DYER was employed by the Valley Steel Inc., Centralia.” 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Floyd Eagan

 

  

        (V-248b) - Floyd Eagan                                         (V-304) - Floyd Eagan funeral

 

"The Kinmundy Express" -  Jan. 13, 1944 - "Here’s one from Pvt. Floyd EAGAN, who is now watching the hula girls. He says: I want to write a few lines to let you know where I am, but I can’t say anything about what I am doing. I am still in the Hawaiian Islands, but on a different island now. They are beautiful, but they are not what you folks back there think they are, and I wouldn’t take all that I have seen here to be back in Kinmundy, but I wouldn’t take anything for what I have seen. I just came back from mail call and I sure did good tonight. I got four letters and that sure helps. The letters from the boys in the service is the first thing I look for. I would like to thank all the neighbors and friends for the beautiful greeting cards which I received for Christmas."

 

Aug. 5, 1948 - "Rites Held Sunday for PFC Floyd EAGAN: The casketed remains of PFC Floyd EAGAN arrived here Friday night and was met by members of Kinmundy Post No. 519, American Legion.  They were taken to the home of the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harrison EAGAN north of town where they lay in state until the funeral hour.  Funeral services were held Sunday morning at 11 o’clock from the gymnasium, Rev. DOTY, officiating.  Interment was made in Evergreen Cemetery under the auspices of Kinmundy Post No. 519, American Legion.  PFC EAGAN was killed in action on Feb. 19, 1945.  He was interred in the USFA Military Cemetery, Santa Barbara, temporary cemetery in the Philippine Islands.  Floyd, the son of Harrison R. and Lena EAGAN, was born Sept. 19, 1918 in Alma twp. where he attained his grade school education.  The family moved to their present home just north of the C. & E.I. Lake in 1936 and Floyd attended our high school, graduation with the class of ‘40.  He was a member of Company L Illinois, National Guard, at Salem.  This outfit was mustered in the U.S. Army March 5, 1941.  After training in various camps, it shipped overseas in July 1943.  This outfit, the 33rd Division, landed on the Hawaiian Islands, going from there to New Guinea, thence to the East Indies and finally landed in the Philippines about Feb. 1st. He was killed in action on Feb. 19, 1945.  He was a member of the 130th Infantry.  Floyd is another boy who we remember as a very quiet, unassuming lad, who had a smile for everyone he met.  Besides his parents, he is survived by two brothers, Stephen of this city, and Harold of Champaign, and two sisters, Mary GORDON and Thelma MOLENHOUR, both of Iuka." 

 


 

 

(V-203) Garrel Eagan

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 25, 1966 – “Seaman Recruit Garrel E. EAGAN, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. James O. Eagan, Kinmundy, has graduated from 9 weeks of Naval basic training at the Naval Training Center, Great Lakes.”  (A photo was included with this article.)

  

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 5, 1967 – “Seaman Garrel E. EAGAN, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. James O. Eagan of Kinmundy, has returned to Newport, R.I. after a 4 month deployment to Northern Europe and the Mediterranian aboard the anti-submarine warfare support aircraft carrier USS Essex.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Apr. 25, 1968 – “Mr. and Mrs. James Eagan have received word from J.A. Harkins, Capt. U.S. Navy, Commanding officer of the USS Essex, notifying them that their son, Garrel, has been promoted to Electronics Technician 3rd Class.  Garrel is serving aboard the USS Essex which is an aircraft carrier.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 20, 1968 – “ETM-3 Garrel EAGAN, USN Quantico, Va., is spending a 20 day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James O. Eagan and Janet.  He recently returned after 4 months tour of the Mediterranean and European countries.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 31, 1968 – “Electronics Technician Third Class, Garrel E. EAGAN, USN, 20, son of Mr. and Mrs. James O. Eagan of Kinmundy, participated in the recovery of the Apollo 7 while serving aboard the anti-submarine warfare aircraft carrier USS Essex, a unit of Task Force One Forty.  The veteran Essex, oldest aircraft carrier in active service, was selected as the Atlantic Fleet primary recovery ship.  The carrier was positioned along the Apollo launch vehicle ground track, approximately 400 miles east of Camp Kennedy, Fla., to recover the astronauts had there been a launch vehicle malfunction.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 8, 1969 – “S.N. Garrel E. EAGAN, son of Mr. and Mrs. James O. Eagan, returned home Monday after receiving his discharge having completed his term in the Navy, serving aboard the U.S.S. Essex.”

 

 

 


James Eagan

 

"The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 11, 1945 – “Mrs. Gladys EAGAN received word from her sons, Noah and James, that they had met at Camp Philadelphia, Reims, France.  According to the word received, the boys have been stationed close to each other and did not know it.  Both boys are expecting to be shipped home soon, as both are high point men.  James’ wife, Mrs. Wanda EAGAN, resides in Kinmundy, and Noah’s wife, Mrs. Betty EAGAN, resides in Sesser, Ill.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 13, 1945 – “Pvt. James EAGAN arrived home Dec. 3, where he is now spending some very enjoyable time with his wife and 2 small children.  Also, his mother, Mrs. Gladys EAGAN.  James entered the service Sept. 26, 1943 and shipped overseas March 1, 1944, landing in Casa Blanca.  From there he went to Oran and then to France, where he was stationed for several months, working on a pipe line.  He started home Nov. 19 and landed in Boston, Nov. 30.  He received his discharge at Camp Grant, Dec. 2.  Pvt. EAGAN wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon, the Unit Citation, and the European Theater Ribbon with 2 stars, representing the campaigns of Southern France and the Rhineland.  James says he intends to return to his old job in the oil fields.”

 


 

James L. Eagan

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 3, 1966 – “Mr. and Mrs. James O. Eagan have received word that their son, Jim, arrived in Viet Nam on Oct. 19th.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 8, 1966 – “Friday morning, Mrs. James O. Eagan received a “Christmas Greeting” from Hong Kong in the form of a telephone call from her son, PFC James L. EAGAN, stationed in Vietnam.  He is spending a week in a rest and recuperation center there.  He told his mother, who was the only one at home to receive the call, that this was early but probably later he would not have the chance to phone.  He also wished to extend a ‘Merry Christmas’ to all his relatives and friends.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Apr. 27, 1967 – “Mr. and Mrs. James O. Eagan received word March 20th that their son, Specialist 4th Class, James L. EAGAN has been promoted to Sgt. E5. Sgt. Eagan is serving with the 9th Engineers Division in the Macoo Deltas.  He has been in Vietnam since Oct. 19, 1966.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 21, 1967 – “Jim EAGAN, son of Mr. and Mrs. James O. Eagan, received his discharge from the Army in California Friday and returned home Saturday after spending the past 11 and one-half months in Vietnam.”

 


 

 

 

(V-250c) Noah Eagan

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - May 11, 1944 -"Here’s a nice letter from T 5 Noah EAGAN, who from the tone of his letter, is following in the footsteps of his father, the late Harry EAGAN. He is now in England, so we are wondering if the English haircuts are any different from ours. Anyway, he says: Still in England and receiving the paper regularly as possible. No news lately, but I guess the war is still on as our cigarettes are still rationed. I thought James was going to get over here but he seems to have gone to Africa. I wish I had some of the boys APO numbers who are in England. I saw a boy from Centralia last week that I knew. His twin brother is in my company. The days are long here. It breaks daylight about 6:20 a.m. and gets dark about 11 p.m. I have never mentioned this before but I am learning a trade in this army. I was Battalion barber up until this week, now I cut my own Co.’s and the battalion officers hair and am kept very busy. This makes me have only one formation each day, revelry. I have got in about 1 year of barbering now. My army day is from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 6 days a week. I am rated to drive a semi-truck when we move from here. I have had several different jobs in this outfit. I spent about 5 months as a crane operator and truck driver, 3 months of this was in the "wilds" of Louisiana on maneuvers, also spending a month in power shovel school in Virginia. I operated a power grader in the desert at Imperial Dam and spent some months as assistant motor Sgt. But the job I like best is thinking of the day when I can be home. Well, Norris, thanks again for the paper and keep the press rolling. It sure helps the morale."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 22, 1945 – “T4 Noah EAGAN arrived in Kinmundy Nov. 15th to visit his mother, Mrs. Gladys EAGAN, for a few days.  He received his discharge from Camp Atterbury, Ind. Nov. 1, and has been spending the intervening time with his wife and son in Sesser in the home of her parents.  Noah entered the service in Jan. 1943, and shipped overseas in October 1943, landing in England.  From there he went to France, Luxembourg, Belgium and Germany.  He started home Oct. 14th and landed at Norfolk, Va. Oct. 7.  Sgt. EAGAN wears the Good Conduct Medal, the European Theater of Operations Ribbon with 5 stars, representing the battles of Rhineland, Normandy, Ardennes, Central Europe, and Northern France, the American Theater of Operations Ribbon, and the Presidential Ribbon.  Noah will return to his former position in Mattoon within a few days.”

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Ralph Eagan - “The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 24, 1946 –“Omega: Ralph EAGAN, who is now discharged from the army, is at home with his parents in Siloam District.”

 


 

Don Eblin - “The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 13, 1955 – “Pleasant Grove: Pvt. Don EBLIN, who was home on furlough, and Doug GOODWIN and Charles WHITNEY called on Mr. and Mrs. Clyde ROSE, Jackie and Mrs. Georgia EBLIN Saturday night.”

  


 

 

(V-224) Rudolph J. Edwards

            Spanish-American War Veteran - This badge was possibly worn at a reunion of veterans.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Thomas L. Edwards

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 10, 1946 –“Omega: Thomas EDWARDS and Virgil HARRIS are home on furlough and were in Omega, Saturday.”

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Jan. 14, 1954: "Thomas EDWARDS Declared Dead August 7, 1952: Mrs. Ruth EDWARDS, of Salem, received word Thursday from the government, declaring her husband, Thomas L. EDWARDS, 28, officially dead.  Thomas, a member of the Marines, was reported missing in action on Aug. 7, 1952 in Korea.  He had previously been wounded and sent back into action.  Mrs. EDWARDS is a bookkeeper for the Marion County Service Co.  There are 2 small daughters.  Thomas was also a brother to Mrs. Kenneth WILKINSON, residing south of this city."

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Jan. 28, 1954: "Thomas EDWARDS Memorial Sunday: Memorial services will be held for Thomas L. EDWARDS in the Baptist church in Iuka Sunday with Rev. Delbert GOIF, the pastor, in charge.  The services will be concluded in the East Lawn Cemetery in Salem, where a monument will be dedicated to his honor.  The services in the cemetery will be in charge of the Salem Post American Legion.  It will be remembered that Thomas was reported missing in action in Korea on Aug. 7, 1952.  There were hope of him being alive but his name has not appeared on the prisoner list.  Therefore, the government has officially declared him dead.  The deceased leaves a wife and 2 small daughters living in Salem.  A sister, Mrs. Kenneth WILKINSON, resides south of Kinmundy." 

 

V-52) Thomas L. Edwards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

(FE-8) Abram Elder - Pension Card

 

(FE-17) William Gore Elder with step-mother Margaret (Caldwell) Elder

 


 

James Ellis

"The Kinmundy Express" - Feb. 8, 1945 - "Here’s a nice letter from Sgt. James ELLIS, who is with a Bomber Squadron in England. Here’s what he says: Just finished the article written by Johnny BROOM. Was amused at "four years", but believe me, we’ll both be home before our beards turn gray. I, myself, have nearly that much time with a slight interlude. I was thinking about Mr. BROOM’s peach orchard one summer nearly an eternity ago when Johnny, Charles, Howard DOWNEY and I were worming Mr. BROOM’s peach tree and all the fun we had. Now it seems that it didn’t happen in our time. A reflection of my army service seems a lifetime. When I was first drafted, I wound up at Camp Roberts, Cal. in the infantry. However, the army decided I was too old so I wound at my old desk in the theater at Chicago. Pearl Harbor made a young man of me and I was quickly recalled. My outfit had already landed in Australia, so I was sent to the Chicago Recruiting and Induction Service and was placed in DEML. I spent many happy days there. The army again ended that by sending all general service men to line outfits when limited service and WACs became popular for desk jobs. I took another train ride and woke up one morning in the Tank Destroyers. I liked this very much so took an OCS test and was passed by the board and moved up 28 on the waiting list. Shortly after this my hips started to give me trouble caused by all those long hikes. I had sat in that easy chair for 10 long years, so was toughened up in the wrong places. The big boys flew over us a lot so I decided to give up my chance to be an officer. Being a lazy man, I thought I would rather ride than walk. The "Heanies" got me and I like it very much. As you all know, I am in England. I came over ahead of my crew on a boat nearly a year ago I had to wait for them. Before the rest arrived I obtained a pass and went to Coventry. When I got off the train, the first boy I saw was standing in front of me, ragged, dirty-faced, about five and was smiling. He said, "Do you fly the Heanies," I said, "Yes." That was a mistake because he would not leave me so we became friends. He got all my candy and gum. He called me "chum" as that is their favorite expression. Nothing would do but that I see his grandmother. When I started up the street hardly anything was left. Everything had been severally bombed and burned out. Even now bodies are being found and the rubbish is still being cleaned. This boy’s whole family was killed, all he had left was his grandmother, who was nearly blind and lived in a small part of a house. When the little boy told her that I was an airman, her face lit up and with a very stern bitterness, she said, "Son, give them one for us, and do it good." What little she had to eat she wanted to give me, but I just couldn’t. Already I was thinking, "what if this was my little boy and I was coming home." A lump and a bad taste came into my mouth. Later she told me that an American officer wanted to take him to the States and adopt him for he certainly was a nice shaver. I came to this base ahead of my crew, who finally caught up with me. I flew one mission before they came. One engine went out so we trailed behind over the target and back. I was wet for there was a report of bandits in the air and I really did sweat that one out. When they came we had a reunion, a few drinks, and a lot of talk. A week later we were introduced to our plane "Miss B Haven." It carried the picture of a Navajo girl back to us, one leg up, head to us smiling, for she was in the process of removing her unmentionables. She took us for many a ride. Twice our oxygen went out and we had to carry bottles in our laps. A few times we exercised our guns and flak rolled us around often. One day she was grounded and we flew a ship, "Rosie’s Sweat Box." Master Sergeants were on the flak guns that day and we came back with 28 holes, some pretty big. We all felt bad when another crew flew our ship and had to crash land it in Belgium. That was old Miss B Haven’s 65th trip. Our new ship carries the picture of my red-headed cousin in Chicago, Miss Joan KOHL and the name of it is "Strictly Kopasectic." We wanted everything O.K. always, so started on the right foot. One trip six ME-109's were on our tail. Four cued up to attack us and the other two were amusing us. Just as the four started in, a P-51 came in behind and got all four before I fired a shot. He flew by, dipped his wings and I waved back and said "Thank you" Little Friend". (They call us big friends.) When I came back and in the briefing room the flight surgeon gave me 2 shots of spirits for I was shaky but this braced me and I thought of that little boy and carried on. We were well on our way to a Happy Christmas and even obtained liquid refreshments. Jerry had hit the First Army. My brother Edward is in that outfit and had already received a Purple Heart for excellent work in the Hurtgen Forest where he twas wounded. Turkey or nothing else mattered except to help the boys. There is nothing we would rather do than help our ground boys for we can see immediate results. We were very nervous and agitated because fog was thick as pea soup and we couldn’t get up. Finally it cleared and we were going every day. We got tired as "Hell" but the next morning when the C.O. said you have another chance to help the boys, we were eager. I’m ready, always, because my brother is in there, I can still see that little English lad and his grandmother. I keep thinking of my little boy at home and I know it must be done. These Jerries are not fooling and are not playing and if we give them another chance later you can bet your bottom dollar you will see your home as I saw this English boy’s home. Regards to all you service men, wherever you are."

 

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 30, 1945 – “Here’s one from S. Sgt. James ELLIS, who has seen overseas duty but is now stationed in Texas.  He expects to be out soon and says: Sometime during the month of Sept., you will have the pleasure of addressing me as Mr. when I call upon you to pay the $1.50 I owe for the paper as I want to continue it as a civilian.  I can well remember the days in England when everyone said, “Just get back to the States, you’ll be the first one out.”  Well, even with my 112 points, it took V-J Day to do it, and only when the Army did it wholesale - everyone over 84 points.  So you see boys Overseas, you got 20 percent extra for sweating it out with me, and you may still be in Kinmundy before I am.  To be a little serious while I was home on furlough I was consistently asked 2 questions I will attempt to answer tonight.  The First - What was my worst day of combat, or the toughest day of all overseas?  The second - What do I think of a peace time draft?  In regards to the first - My roughest day of combat.  Four members of our crew and myself had just reported back to our barracks off a 48 hour pass which we had spent in London.   We all had plenty of mail in our sacks, I believe that I had 15 letters in all; three of which I especially remember because they all bore the same date, and upon checking with another date, came to mean a great deal to me and one of the mysteries hard to understand if you are not a believer in God.  The first letter from my parents in Kinmundy was pretty blue.  They had all been sick with a touch of the grippe and had not worked for a few days and everything seems to be upset which made me feel a little bad, but everyone has those things so I dismissed it and picked up the second letter.  This was from an Army Nurse.  She was writing for me to try and come to France to see my brother, Ed, who was wounded in the hospital and she thought I would be good for his morale.  She went on to say - your brother has had a bad shock.  His outfit, the 28th Division (nicknamed Keystone) and called the “Bucket of Blood” or “Bloody Bucket” by the Germans because of it’s reputation and it’s shoulder insignia was a red patch resembling a buck somewhat, has had very tough sledding in the Hurtgen Forest and its ranks were sadly depleted.  She went on to say that my brother’s entire Battery had been surrounded by the Jerries and they decided to shoot their way out.  The fight lasted several hours, but out of the battery, only 5 got back to the American lines, and my brother was one of the five, but he had been wounded.  The rest of his battery was either killed or captured.  These 5 men were later awarded the Bronze Star, but as my brother later said, he would rather trade it for one of his buddies.  Later I found the date of this action identical with my toughest mission.  Sorry to say that I was unable to get leave to go see my brother at that time.  The third letter was from my wife.  She and my little boy were all right, but all during the previous my little boy, who did not know me at all, and thousands of miles away from me, kept consistently asking for his daddy and crying.  That night all during the night my wife said she slept in catnaps and would wake up screaming and yelling “Daddy, Daddy, Daddy.”  She found this hard to explain.  He had never done it before and she knew he was not sick.  This made me curious and I must admit that this was the letter that started me checking dates.  The first thing I thought of was my list of missions.  I got it down and sure enough, there it was.  LEIPSIG-GERMANY for me was the roughest of them all as well as the crew.  Much later we learned that this was the heaviest defended of all areas in Germany against air attack.  The triangle area of Merseburg - Madgeburg - Leipsig was about a 75 miles long triangle.  IN this was found the German Army proving Ground for new weapons resembling our Abeerdeen, Md. Proving Grounds.  In this area was Synthetic Oil Plants and Storage Tanks.  V-1 and V-2 Factories were in this area as well as their new Rocket and Jet propelled plane factories.  At any place in this area you had 1000 batteries firing at you or 2000 shells everytime the guns fired.  You never could fly higher than they could shoot.  At 4 p.m. we checked the bulletin board.   BROWN’s crew was scheduled for a mission the next day so we ate and went to the movie.  It was “A Guy Named Joe”.  On the way back we stopped by the mess hall for a few slices of bread to take to the barracks.   On of the boys had received some cheese from home so we had toast and cheese.  By the time we hit the hay it was 10:30 p.m.  The green light was still burning which meant there would be a mission.  None of us could sleep, kept tossing and turning, several times I sat upright in bed for no reason at all and the boys said I had nightmares and kept them awake.  I guess this was as good excuse as any for I noticed that none of them were sleeping either.  At 1:10 the door swung open and we all to a man, were setting upright in our beds.   Lucky said briefing at 2:30 so we all hopped out of bed, dressed, caught our truck and went to the mess hall for 2 fried eggs, cereal and oranges.  I always took my orange with me for on the mission they always froze as hard as a rock and I liked to suck on them coming back over the English Channel.  In the briefing room we noticed that we were flying in the Lead Squadron and were flying TAILEND CHARLIE.  We didn’t like that for this also had another name, “THE PURPLE HEART CORNER”.  To top it all off we did not have our own plane.  The M.P.’s had finally collected all the passes.  The Colonel came in and the door was locked.  He raised up the movie curtain and we saw that our target was LEIPZIG.  We had heard about it before but this was our first trip there.  Our primary bombing was for some underground oil tanks.  The secondary was V-2 and Jet Propelled plane factories, and last resort was an Airfield in Germany up the Rhine River.  After weather briefing we gunners were excused.  We went  the Armament shop for our guns.  It was pitch dark and we had to be careful how we used our lights.  After the guns were installed and checked we helped the Bombardier check his bombs.  At the last minute something went wrong with No. 4 engine and we had to change to the spare ship.  We had no time to check this thoroughly.  We just had 45 minutes to catch the formation at the English Channel which we did.  This ship “SHADE RUFF” had a record of 72 missions already and was pretty beat up but was about as good a FLYING FORTRESS as ever hit Germany.  It was daylight now and I could see other groups behind.  Many of the “HEAVIES” were up this day and we knew that Germany was going to catch H____ this date.  We were routed over the front lines where the English were this time to help their morale for they had run into some hard fighting.  Flying along at 27,000 feet, nearly 6 miles in the air, we had about another hour until I.P. time which is the beginning time of the bomb run.  A report came over the V.H.F. “Bandits in the Air”, however, we saw none.  Number two oxygen system had gone out over the front lines as 2 bursts of flak came near us and one piece had penetrated the oil line.  The Pilot, Navigator and Radio Man were on the Oxygen bottles now.  No enemy planes sighted to the I.P. coming onto the I.P.  The Co-pilot said that there was a big black cloud ahead.  For us not to worry, it was only black smoke from some has been flak.  We had a 20 minute run.  From the beginning we ran into Box barrage and predicted our tracking flak.  The smoke was so thick, I could hardly see our low Squadron.  We finally lost the high and low.  A large burst just ahead of our number 3 engine tore out our oil line on that engine so the pilot feathered this one.  Another large burst right behind the right wing tore a large hole thru the radio room and a piece came thru the side and knocked the waist gunner down.  He called me over the phone and said “Ellis, I’m dead.”  I said, “No, you are not for you can talk to me.”  He was scared, the piece was about 4 inches long and one-half inch thick.  His flak suit saved him.  They were tracking us down at 5 o’clock and at 7 o’clock even.  They were tracking with one battery that was directly bursting underneath and as I was in the tail I kept telling the pilot to take it up - up - up and up.  He was using some evasive action but it was almost impossible to know where to go.  It was bursting ahead, over at our sides, underneath, and right behind us.  We had no choice but pray and that was what I done for 30 straight minutes.  The poor plane was tossed every which way.  I had a lot of bruises.  We did not hit the primary.  The lead wires to the bombs had been severed.  The deputy took over.  We made a 360 or circle, still in flak all this time and came back over it.  This time weaving back and forth.  Something happened again.  So number three took over and we went on and finally had to drop on the Airfield at Halberstadt.  WE HAD BEEN IN EXTENSIVE FLAK FOR 42 STRAIGHT MINUTES.  The record for the Eighth Air Force is 44.  Out of the flak area we took Inventory.  Every plane had one or more engines feather.  Some had big gaping holes in their sides.  Part of the wings, tails, and nose were shot clear away.  My right tail stabilizer not three feet from me had a big hole large enough for a baseball to fly thru.  In my window two had just missed my head about the size of a quarter.  I was carrying my mother’s Bible, which I did on every mission.  A piece of flak had ripped up the right sleeve of the Navigator’s arm.  Another large piece had cut clear away the whole right sole of the co-pilot’s heated shoe and overshoe, had it been 3 inches higher, he would have no foot today.   The Engineer had the dome of his turret blown off but he miraculously escaped injury.  We were lucky that we were not hit by fighters on the way back or none of us would be here today.  When we finally landed at our home base we had the least holes of all 28.  The average amount was 218 and one had 432 holes.  They all came back which speaks a lot for the B-17.  Our colonel said by the law of averages, we all should have been down in Germany.  We had for that one mission, all the planes to repair - 15 dead men and 25 more wounded.  My best buddy - a tail gunner - in the plane next to ours was killed.  Flak had severed his jugular vein.  Before they could get to him, he was dead.  I am happy to say that I got to drop bombs 3 times as a toggler.  The last time on my last mission, Feb. 22, 1945.  At briefing that day, we were told that this date was the beginning of the battle of Germany and we should do extra good today.  4,000 planes were out.  We had to knock out a crossing where 3 railroads came together.  The town was LUDWIGLUST Germany.  Pictures showed we got it 100%.  To any boy in Germany, who will send me a picture of that railroad crossing at LUDWIGLUST, I will give one dollar.  I want a ground picture.  I have an air picture.  Now to answer the second question.  It is my belief that we should be prepared but I say do it in the following manner.  During your high school term, one night a week should be spent with the National Guard studying Basic, etc.  After you are graduated from high school during that 3 month summer vacation, you should be sent to maneuvers some place and at that conclusion your training is finished until such time as the country might have to call upon you.  Before I would ever vote for such an outright draft for my son, I would want the following changes to the Army: - We preach democracy, make our army one.  Promotions straight up the line from the ranks, never stopping at Warrant Officers.  - Stop the antagonizing policy of saluting or bringing down so that everybody salutes everyone else.  Do away with the cast system.  - The Articles of War are compulsory for men where punishment is concerned.  Must be read every 6 months.  Make the ones that help the G.I. Compulsory to be read also.  - Place court martial representation on a 50-50 basis.  One half enlisted men and the other half Officer on a General Court Martial.  The Enlisted Man should have his own enlisted lawyer.   - When the work day is done, Ranks should be equal as far as sociability is concerned.   I highly advise a service club where EM and Officers can mingle if they so desire.  I find that many officers resent this barrier as much as the enlisted men.  - M.P.’s should be 30 years of age and over at all times.  The petty things enforced upon M.P.’s by certain Provost Marshalls such as hauling a man in for a shirt sleeve unbuttoned, etc., and fined $25, or a week’s restriction should definitely be done away with and the Provost who suggested it be made to suffer this punishment.  - Inspection Officers who visit overseas units from the Inspector General’s department should come right into the barracks and find out what is going on.  To many outfits have been abused because certain officers thought they were Almighty God.  The men were left high and dry with Court Martial staring them in the face if they wrote to their Congressman or the President about certain conditions.  That is why I say that the Enlisted Lawyer, who is looking out for the welfare of the men of his battalion, should make a monthly report restricted direct to the Commanding General of his outfit, and not THRU CHANNELS.  Regards to the fellows and Boys.  I never was court martialed but I saw a lot of things that should have been changed.  Lucky we all did as good as we did.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 27, 1945 – “Fort Sheridan, Ill., Sept. 29, 1945 - "Staff Sgt. James ELLIS is leaving here today for his home at Kinmundy, Ill. after being honorably discharged from the Army Air Force.  Sgt. ELLIS entered the service May 28, 1941, and served 12 months overseas with the 8th Air Force based in England where he was assigned duty as B-17 Flying Fortress as a tail gunner.  He completed 30 combat missions, winning the Air Medal with 4 Oak Leaf Clusters, ETO ribbon with 4 campaign stars, and the Good Combat Medal.  Sgt. ELLIS is the husband of Martha M. ELLIS, of Kingman, Kansas, and the son of Mr. and Mrs. Louie JEZEK of Kinmundy, Ill.  Following his return from overseas, Sgt. ELLIS has been stationed at Bryan Army Airfield, Texas, an instrument instructors pilot school of the Army Air Forces Central Flying Training Command.  Prior to his entrance into the armed forces, Sgt. ELLIS was a theater manager for Balaban & Katz Theater Corp., Chicago, Ill., and expects to return to his former job.”

 


 

(V-53) Tiny Ellis

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Jan. 20, 1944 - "Here’s one from the Aleutians written on Jan. 3 from Sgt. Tiny ELLIS. He says: Just another one was mentioned within your column previously and wish to fill the request of my dear commentator. Your papers have come frequently thru terrain seldom heard of, but playing an interesting part in this war, but must say they are accomplishing great achievements toward keeping morale posted on local news of home affairs. So may I thank you for kind appreciation in sending vital information we have no other way of accumulating on local news. Publishing letters written by men on various fronts of the world explain many answers our mothers and fathers worry over that are not necessary. Nearly 2 years ago this continent was invaded by desperate fighting people called Nipponese, who could never get along with themselves much less peaceful people as we are. And thru our 2 great military leaders, Lt. Gen. Simon B. BUCKNER and Vice Admiral Thomas C. KINKAID, we eliminated the yellow rascals from the Aleutians and in which we duly credit forces that may of participated within it. Maybe it could have been done sooner with a higher cost of human lives, but I don’t think it would have been worthy in cause, so let us congratulate our leaders and it’s staff for completing the job it set out to do. Not quite 2 years ago I left the States for destination unknown, as to what we were to do, had little interest, only wanting to complete our mission and return home where our loved ones live, and yet we have not fulfilled our goal by defeating the enemies. I’ve seen men feed the fish several times by leaning over the rail or bow of a ship, but never have I seen men thrown off in the water to walk ashore with ice freezing on their clothing as soon as the air hit them (only in movies). Those are just a few incidents seen throughout my army life. The interior of Alaska is quite interesting with Eleuts and Eskimo people populating 3 quarters of it and really sports in hunting, trapping and mining is a popular event to us soldiers, for we’ve been softies so long it made us realize what we were fighting for. Delightful scenery can be obtained from a distance thru cars passing by a small highway leading into gorgeous mountains with streams of cold water seeping down crevices of snow capped mountains into a booklet of running fish called trout. Now drifting westward, I leave your imagination stress upon itself of hardships were may have suffered on a barren isolated spot within the Pacific ocean. Recreation facilities are wonderful compared to what I’ve read on various other front lines. We have had a few celebrities, such as Errol Flynn, Martha Q. Briscoll, Ruth Carroll and Jimmy Dodd. Also a representative from Washington, Captain Eddie Rickenbacker, who played a vital part in World War I of the Air Corps. Movies are nothing but the latest pictures made such as: Coney Island, Sweet Rosie O’Grady, and many more I can’t recall just now. So if ever the war is over, just pack up your old gray bonnet and catch the next transport going to Tokyo for a vacation under Northern Lights of Alaska."

 

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Dec. 28, 1944 - "After 31½ months in the Aleutain Islands, Sgt. Tiny L. ELLIS arrived here Saturday to spend his 21 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louie JEZEK, and family. Sgt. ELLIS has been in the army for 38 months and his homecoming has certainly been a pleasure to his parents, relatives, and friends. He has been attached to the Aviator Engineers in the Aleutians. After his furlough has lapsed, he will report to Gigar Field, Spokane, Wash., for reassignment. Sgt. ELLIS naturally, can relate many stories about the Aleutians. The islands are barren and unhabited. But they do make an excellent base for us, which is their only use at this time. The weather is very bad which is the main hardship our boys have to endure. Needless to say that Sgt. ELLIS is exceedingly happy to set foot back in the United States, and more so, to see his relatives and many friends around here again."

 


Charles Elston

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 2, 1965 –“Charles ELSTON, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Elston, left for St. Louis on Aug. 4th for the Great Lakes for training in the U.S. Navy."

 

 

Robert Elston

 “The Kinmundy Express” – March 3, 1966 – “Seaman Recruit Robert W. ELSTON, 20, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Elston of Kinmundy, has completed 7 weeks of Navy basic training at the Naval Training Center at Great Lakes, Ill.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 16, 1966 – “Fireman Apprentice Robert Wayne ELSTON, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Elston of Kinmundy, is attending the 14-week Electrician’s Mate course at the Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill.”

 

(V-415) Robert W. Elston and Charles T. Elston (sons of Edward & Marie Elston of Kinmundy)

             pictured with their maternal grandparents, William and Ella Whitt of Granite City, IL

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-53) Robert Elston (son of Charles D. & Minnie Elston, and brother of Edward Elston)

 


 

Gary L. Finckbone - “The Kinmundy Express” – May 11, 1967 – “Army Private First Class Gary L. FINCKBONE, 20, son of Melvin A. Finckbone of Alma, was assigned to the 9th Infantry Division in Vietnam, Apr. 16.  Pvt. Finckbone, assigned to Company E, 2nd Battalion of the division’s 47th Infantry, entered the Army in Oct. 1966 and completed basic training at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo.  He is a 1966 graduate of Kinmundy-Alma High School.  His wife, Linda Louise, lives in Kinmundy.”

 


 

Thomas O. Finley - “The Kinmundy Express” – July 30, 1953 – “Army 1st Lt. Thomas O. FINLEY, who’s wife, Hilary, lives in Alma, recently arrived for duty with U.S. Forces in Austria. Lt. FINLEY is assigned to the 4th Armored Cavalry Reconnaissance Battalion at Linz. He is a 1950 graduate of the Univ. of Ill., and entered the Army in June of that year.”

 


 

Hubert Fisher - “Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – Aug. 8, 1918 - "Word received from Hubert M. FISHER from “over there” says tell everybody hello and that he was enjoying the best of health.  He tells of frequent visits with Harry RICHARDSON, son of Rev. W.D. RICHARDSON, former pastor of the M.E. Church of this city."

 


 

Herbert  “Sonny”  Followell

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 14, 1954 – “A/3C Sonny FOLLOWELL left Monday for Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, having spent a furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Percy FOLLOWELL.” 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 17, 1955 – “A3C Herbert L. “Sonny” FOLLOWELL, son of Mr. and Mrs. Percy FOLLOWELL, and Miss Winnie KILLEREW, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jack KILLEREW of Greenville, Miss., were married Jan. 21 in Greenville.   Airman FOLLOWELL received his education in the Kinmundy H.S. and is now serving in the U.S. Air Force.  The bride is a registered nurse receiving her high school training in Greenville, Miss., and attending Nursing School in Laurel, Miss.  The young couple are now stationed at Elgin Air Force Base, Fla.” 

 


 

(V-68) Melvin Foltz

 


 

(V-172) Brian W. Ford

 

 

John S. Ford

(V-4) John S. Ford

 

 

(V-170) John W. Ford

 


 

Kenneth E. Ford - “The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 13, 1956 – “Army Pvt. Kenneth E. FORD, son of Mr. and Mrs. George E. FORD, Kinmundy, recently graduated from the automotive maintenance helpers course at Army’s Armor Training Center., Ft. Knox, Ky.  He entered the Army last July, and is a 1956 graduate of Kinmundy Alma High School.”

 


 

(V-173) Philip H. Frakes - 1952 in Korea (Heart Break Ridge is behind him)

 

"Philip H. Frakes - Military Life (overview): 

     My military life started during World War II while I was in High School. Since I was too young to join the active military service, I joined the Home Guard in Salem, Illinois. I was a junior in high school. They disbanded in 1946, after the war was over.  In April of 1947 they reorganized the Illinois National Guard. I joined at that time as a private. I rose in rank of Tech Sergeant or Sergeant First Class. I was appointed 2nd Lieutenant after completing military 10 series for a Commissioned Officer February 1, 1952. Our National Guard Division was called into Active Service on February 15, 1952. We reported to Camp Cook, California on that date. It was close to Lompac, California. I was assigned to Company C of the 130th Infantry Reg. I trained there until I went to Fort Benning, Georgia for officer training school in June 1952 thru October 4, 1952.

     I received my orders for overseas assignment in the last of July 1952 to the far East Command. I, however, didn't leave the States until November 30 from Camp Stoneman, California. I went back to Camp Cook after I got married to Monna CONANT in October of 1952. She went with me. We only stayed a short time when they gave me thirty day leave before I went overseas. At Camp Stoneman I met my fellow officers from Company C, who received their orders too. We left Camp Stoneman two days later on a airplane flight to Japan. We stopped over at Hawaii for a day and half because of bad weather. Then we proceeded to Tokyo, Japan. We then were assigned to a CBR school at Camp Gifu, Japan for three weeks. We spent Christmas there. We then went to Kyoto, Japan to catch a ship to Pusan, Korea. We took a train to Seoul, Korea from assignment of our Unit. We were assigned to the 45th Infantry Division. We spent New Years in Seoul. When we got to the 45th Division, they assigned us to our units. I went to the 180th Regiment, Company C. The other fellow officers, Charles FERRELL went to the 179th Regiment Headquarters supply and Dwayne LOWERY went to the 279th Regiment, Heavy Weapons Company. I suppose they wanted to separate us since we came from the same company back in the states. My unit was in reserve when I joined them. While in reserved we had an operation of our battalion to raid a US supply depot. It was told us that the supplies at the depot was being sold to other parties outside of the U.S. Troops. Some of our military men were involved in stealing equipment and supplies. It was a cold and snowy night when we headed out on our mission. It took about eight hours to get there and we had to walk across rough terrain to get to the rear of the depot, where they were staling the equipment. We had the depot surrounded and they couldn't get through. I only heard one shot fired and no one got hurt, that I was aware of. I know one thing, I was sure tired walking in the rugged hills (or small mountains).

     We were called in to take over the territory that was held by the 40th Infantry Division on the 30th of January, 1953. The next day the G2 asked that our company send out a combat patrol to find out exactly where the enemy was located. Since I was the only commissioned officer outside of the Company Commander, I volunteered to take out the patrol. It was a cold night and there was snow on the ground. We were in mountain terrain. I had a reinforced squad with three BARs for firepower. When we left our DMZ, we went to the next ridge where our outpost was set and continued to the next ridge. By that time, we got down in the valley. We were engaged in a firefight. The whole side of the mountain (or hill) lit up like a christmas tree with gun flashes. We returned our fire but were pinned down. I adjusted artillery fire on the enemy and the enemy pinned their ears down. We then pulled back and went back up the ridge we had just come over. I sent my troops back to friendly lines, while I stayed at my position and continued to adjust artillery fire on the enemy. They were following us up the hill until the artillery adjusted to fire for effect. At that time the artillery barrage was so intense that the enemy was repulsed. I stayed at my position and continued to adjust fire for the artillery until a shell landed close to me and a piece of shrapnel cut the telephone I was holding, resulting in the loss of communication. Then my radio man and me left my position and headed back to our lines. Later I was awarded the Bronze Star for Valor for this action. I was also promoted to 1st Lieut.

     Later replacements started coming in and I was sent back to the rear to be an instructor and CO of the leadership company, which was for new non-commissioned officers. They called it the School of Standards. The new non-coms were there for three weeks and then sent back to their units. I stayed there until the war was over on July 26, 1953. I actually didn't rotate back to the States until September. I left SOS by truck to Seoul from Chinchon. There we loaded onto a train to Pusan, where we took a physical, then boarding a ship called the Marine Serpent, a troop ship. The ship went through the straights of Japan and up to the Alution Islands, then to Seattle, Washington. It took only eleven days and it was a very good trip. The best food I had had since I left the states. We got into port at 8:30 A.M. and was processed at the port. We then got onto a good train and traveled to Camp Carson, near Colorado Springs, Colorado. We got there on a Friday and we couldn't get all processed until Monday. We had to take another physical and they gave us what money we had coming and a train ticket to St. Louis, Missouri. We were separated from active service on the 23rd of September, 1953.

     I met Jim Kendrick when we got on the train. Jim was in the 40th Infantry Division in Korea. We were classmates in high school We talked all the way back to St. Louis about where we went and where we were located. Our wives met us there at the station. It was a very glorious occasion too. Then we headed back home to Salem, Illinois. AMEN!"

 

 

(V-174) Philip H. Frakes with grandson, Nathan Courtright

 


 

John French

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 19, 1945 – “John FRENCH left here Monday afternoon with the full expectation of going to New York to enlist in the Maritime Service and becoming a cook on ship.  He want to explore the Carribean and Mediterrian Seas.  He expects to be back in Kinmundy in the latter part of the week.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 26, 1945 – “John FRENCH returned home Friday evening.  He didn’t take his expected cruise.  However, he did cruise on Lake Michigan far enough to read the original sign “Schlitz, the Beer that made Milwaukee famous”.  That was enough.  He turned around and came home.”

 


 

Robert Fulfer

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 12, 1945 – “Omega: A farewell supper was given Robert FULFER Sunday night at the Wagner garage.  A large crowd attended and enjoyed the eats and also the music given by the Brown Quartet.  He left for service in Army, Tuesday.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-70) C. Frederick "Fred" Gammon

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 20, 1945 – “PFC Fred GAMMON arrived here Tuesday morning for a 15 day visit with his wife and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. GAMMON.  Fred is a patient in the Schick General Hospital, Clinton, Iowa, where he is being treated for sciatica.  PFC Fred entered the service Aug. 3, 1943 and shipped overseas June 30, 1944, landing in Italy.  From there he went to Southern France and then to Germany with the 7th Army.  He sailed for home Aug. 3, landing in New York Aug. 14th.  He was then sent to the Schick General Hospital.  PFC GAMMON wears the Good Conduct Medal, and the European Theater of Operation Ribbon with 4 stars, representing the Rome-Arno, Southern France, Rhineland, and Central European Campaigns.  Fred looks mighty good and we know he is glad to be home again, even though it is only on a convalescent furlough.  He will have to report back to his hospital as soon as his furlough has expired.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Frederick Gammon

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 29, 1966 – “Frederick D. GAMMON, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Gammon, Kinmundy, completed his training at Officers Training School, Marine Corps Schools, Quantico, Va., where he has been undergoing his first 6 weeks of training as a member of the Marine Corps Platoon Leaders Class Pgm.  The program which is designed especially for college students leads to a commission as a second Lieutenant in the Marine Corps Reserve upon completion of 2 such training periods at Quantico.”

 


 

 

 

(V-71) O. Rex Gammon

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Sept. 21, 1944 - "Here’s a nice letter from T. Sgt. Rex GAMMON, who is stationed in India. He is making an extensive study of the lives of these people as can be seen in the interesting letter which follows: Salam Sahib: In case you haven’t received a letter bearing a similar salutation, it’s translation is, "Peace be unto you, sir!" Or simply, "Good day, sir!" Anyway it’s meaning is the equivalent of "Dear J.N." even though Columbus was wrong and it isn’t from 1 Indian to another Indian. When one starts to write of life in India, he hardly knows where to start and once started it is difficult to find a place to stop. Naturally your interests are going to lie in the direction of politics and the press, so to the best of my ability and within the limits of military restriction and censorship, I’ll try to concentrate on those 2 subjects. Variety is the one word which describes most accurately everything in India, regardless of what the topic of discussion may be - the one exception to this is possibly the weather. This exception can be simply described as "too hot", "too cold", "too wet", and "too dry". I have been subjected to the "too hot" and "too wet" seasons and can’t think of a better way to describe them. The variety of customs, languages, and political institutions is based on the many religions observed. Most of the religions are strange and fascinating to an American, due to their contrast to Christianity. The majority of Indian population follows the God Bramna, creator of everything in the world. They are known as Hindus. Every Hindu is born into the caste system from which it is difficult to rise. One must live, work and marry within the limits of his caste. Second to the Hindus are the Mohammedans, a little closer to our own religious observances. They pray 5 times a day, facing the direction of the Mecca, their Holy City. "Allah is Allah, there is no God but Allah, and Mohammed is his prophet." Fewer in number but worthy of mention are the Sikhs, Gurkhas and Parrsies. The Sikhs follow ten teachers known as Gurus. They make very good soldiers. One needs on a moment’s glance to realize a Sikh, with his long hat and beard, would be a tough customer if aroused. The Gurkhas are Hindus, but differ from the main classification in that they, too, are fighters. The Hindu, who believe in reincarnation, naturally does not kill anything which possess life. The Gurkhas make up a large percentage of the Indian Army. The Parsies follow, Zoraster as their prophet. They dispose of their dead by place them in towers, where they are devoured by vultures. Perhaps you are wondering what all this has to do with politics? The political parties are based on these different religious beliefs. Every Indian, every political organization has Indian Independence foremost in mind. The National Congress based on the Hindu trend of though, is the leading party, sine the Hindus out number the others. Ghandi is their leader - he needs no introduction. The Muslim League, the Mohammedan party, is championed by Mr. Zinnah. The Sikhs have their own party but are too few in number. There are also a couple of minor parties. The trouble arises that in case of independence, none of these parties want to leave with the others. The present plan, under much discussion and arousing world wide attention is Pakistan. This plan would give the National Congress political control where the Hindus are in majority - the Muslim League control where the Mohammedan predominate. Some one evidently forgot to think about the Sikhs. The Indian Press is divided among the different parties. News reports are usually poorly written and a proof reader has surely never been heard of, as the errors in the papers are numerous and often misleading. Censorship regulations are less rigid than in the United States - editorials are often very frank. I’ve read articles the American editor wouldn’t dare to print. Wesbrook Pegler could really go to town in the Indian Press. I’ve just started receiving the Express again and I’ll certainly be glad when I can once again get back on good American soil. Incidentally, I have not run across who doesn’t share that same opinion. I wish to thank you for the paper - though the news is a little late - it is still news - 12,000 miles away from the old hometown. Everyone seems to share the opinion that the termination of the war will once again restore him to civilian life, where he can practice a little individualism. The Army days will be pleasant when one recalls acquaintances made. I’ve made many friends, which otherwise would never have been made. I’ve a little story to tell of one of them. Similar stories appear in "Time" and "Newsweek". This one is worthy of being printed though it may never see the ink. In February I walked in the same barracks and on the bunk next to mine was a Master Sergeant - I noticed his shipping code was the same as mine. Within a few days I knew a lot about E. FOX (M. Sgt.) And I learned to respect him for his individualism. He had been in the Army, since the mobilization of the National Guard, but he was still a civilian at heart. FOX wasn’t a G.I. Joe as we term anyone, who sticks to the letter and goes by the book alone. He had walked out of O.C.I. with only a day between him and the gold bars. FOX and I lived and worked together until a few weeks ago. When FOX left he was still the same boy who walked away from the gold bars - he liked to be an individual. He had been condemned several times because he liked to use his resourcefulness. We’ve just gotten a report came that FOX had recently foiled the Japs and saved the lives of several officers and men. The report also says he has been given the Silver Star. He’s the kind of a guy who would put it away in his barracks bag and forget where he put it. Given everyone my best regards, and thanks again for the paper. "

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Feb. 14, 1946 - "Sgt. Rex GAMMON, son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. GAMMON, arrived home Feb. 9th after receiving his discharge at Jefferson Barracks the same day. Rex entered the service March 26, 1942, and shipped overseas March 6, 1944, landing in Casablanca. From there he went to Oran and then to Bombay, Calcutta, Chabua and Ledo, India. He started homeward Nov. 3 via rail to Karachi, where he waited for a month for a boat. He left there Dec. 30 and landed in Seattle Jan. 30. Sgt. GAMMON was a radar repairman of the Signal Corps and worked radar and radio. He wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon, the American Theater Ribbon, and the Victory Ribbon. After resting for about a month or so, Rex intends to go back to his former position with the Sun Oil Co. of Beaumont, Texas."

 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 14, 1946 –“Sgt. Rex GAMMON, son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. GAMMON, arrived home Feb. 9th after receiving his discharge at Jefferson Barracks the same day.  Rex entered the service March 26, 1942, and shipped overseas March 6, 1944, landing in Casablanca.  From there he went to Oran and then to Bombay, Calcutta, Chabua and Ledo, India.  He started homeward Nov. 3 via rail to Karachi, where he waited for a month for a boat.  He left there Dec. 30 and landed in Seattle Jan. 30.  Sgt. GAMMON was a radar repairman of the Signal Corps and worked radar and radio.  He wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon, the American Theater Ribbon, and the Victory Ribbon.  After resting for about a month or so, Rex intends to go back to his former position with the Sun Oil Co. of Beaumont, Texas.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 21, 1946 –“A picture was printed of Sgt. Rex GAMMON, son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. GAMMON, who arrived home Feb. 9, from India, where he spent almost 2 years.”

 


 

Charles Garden

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 26, 1951 – “Sgt. Charles GARDEN, who has spent the past 8 months in Korea after a two month sojourn in Japan, arrived home Monday where he will enjoy a 30-day furlough.”

 


 

Dick Garden

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 27, 1953 – “Pvt. and Mrs. Dick GARDEN of Ft. Knox, Ky are spending a few days with his mother, Mrs. Lloyd BAILEY before reporting for duty in Europe. He will leave Sept. 7.”

 


 

 

   

(V-187a) Dwight Garner                                          (V-187b)  “The Kinmundy Express” – March 1, 1945

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 23, 1945 – “Dwight GARNER, Water Tender First Class, arrived here Thursday after receiving his discharge from the U.S. Navy on Tuesday previous.  He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ruben GARNER.  Dwight entered the Navy on July 8, 1940, and after completing his boot training at Great Lakes, he was assigned to the USS Brazo and later to the USS Dorsey.  His last ship was the USS Prickett.  On Sept. 29, 1941, while on this ship, he was scalded from steam from a safety valve, severally burning both lower legs and left hand.  After spending some time in the hospital in Honolulu, he was sent back to the states on Feb. 5.  He was permitted to spend a 30 day leave here with his parents last February.  After his leave had expired, he reported back to duty at Farragut, Idaho, and was then sent to Crane, Ind. where he has been since.  He wears the 4 years Good Conduct Ribbon, the Philippine Ribbon, American Theater, and National Defense with 1 star, representing Pearl Harbor, and the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with 3 stars representing the battles of Midway, Coral Sea and the Philippines.”

 


 

(V-369) Berthol "Junior" "B.J." Garrett 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Dec. 14, 1944 - "Junior GARRETT, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bert GARRETT, left Friday for the Navy. Mr. and Mrs. GARRETT have 3 sons in the service."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 12, 1945 – “Junior GARRETT S2c of Indianapolis, Ind. spent the weekend here with his parents, B.O. GARRETT and family.

 


 

Bill Garrett, Carroll Garrett, B.J. Garrett, and Floyd Garrett

(V-22) Garrett brothers: Bill Garrett, Carroll Garrett, B.J. "Junior" Garrett, and Floyd Garrett

 


 

 

 

 

(V-384) Charles William "Bill" Garrett

"The Kinmundy Express" - Jan. 20, 1944  -"Here’s one from Cpl. Chas. GARRETT, written Jan. 2, in New Guinea. He says: Just finished reading the Kinmundy paper, so thought I would drop you a line to let you know that I sure appreciate getting it. Sometimes it takes quite awhile for it to reach me, but it is still news from home to me and I certainly enjoy reading it. I don’t stay in one place very long so I can’t expect to get it all the time. I have never seen anyone that I knew back there. Lawrence BASSETT and I were at the same place for awhile, but I was moved up before I had a chance to see him. Everyone back there seem to be doing a swell job of putting out supplies for the armed forces and I think that before long the Nips are going to wish they had never heard of Pearl Harbor. Thanks again for the paper and I hope that it won’t be too long before I see the old home town again. "

 

"The Kinmundy Express - May 17, 1945

Cpl. Charles W. GARRETT better known to his many friends as "Bill" arrived here on Wednesday of last week for a visit with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bert GARRETT. He was shipped back to the states on "Temporary Duty" and will enjoy 45 days at home. This is Cpl. GARRETT’s first trip home since he was inducted in the service on Jan. 13, 1942. He received his basic training at Fort Bliss, Texas, and was shipped overseas in May 1942, landing in Australia. From there he went to New Guinea on Aug. 17, 1942, where he remained until he started homeward. He left New Guinea on March 31st last and landed in the states May 3rd. He reached home on May 9. He was a member of the 9th Airborne Anti-Air Craft Battalion. Cpl. GARRETT wears the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with three starts representing the Papaun Campaign, The New Guinea Campaign, and the East Indies Campaign. He also wears the Presidential Citation as well as six service stripes on his sleeve. He has two brothers in the service, Sgt. Marvin, an aerial engineer in the Air Corps, who is on duty on the west coast, and Berthol Junior, S2 c, stationed in Indianapolis, Ind. A family reunion was held in the parents’ home Sunday and all children were home except Sgt. Marvin. There is no need to say that Cpl. GARRETT was mighty glad to get home after an absence of 40 months and we are all mighty glad to see him, just the same as we are to see any of the boys back.

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 5, 1945 – “Cpl. Charles W. GARRETT left here June 26 after enjoying a 45 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bert GARRETT and other relatives.  They found that “Bill”, as we know him, had a total of 91 points to his credit and on reporting back at Ft. Sheridan the 28th, was handed his discharge papers.  Cpl. GARRETT entered the service on Jan. 13, 1942, and was shipped to Southwest Pacific in May 1942 as a member of the 9th Airborne Anti-Aircraft Battalion.  He remained in this theater until March 31st, when he started home, arriving here on May 9th.  Cpl. GARRETT wears the Good Conduct Ribbon, the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with 3 stars representing the Papaun Campaign, the New Guinea Campaign, and the East Indies Campaign as well as the Presidential Citation.  Bill says he hasn’t got caught up on his loafing just yet but intends to get into some kind of work in the near future.”

 

 


 

 

Jack Garrett - WWII

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-22) Marvin "Jack" Garrett  

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 22, 1945 – “Sgt. Marvin GARRETT home: Sgt. Marvin GARRETT, son of Mr. and Mrs. B.O. GARRETT, arrived home Saturday evening after receiving his discharge from Chanute Field that morning.  Sgt. GARRETT entered the service July 21, 1942.  He was trained as an aerial engineer in schools in Florida and the west coast.  Although he was stationed along the west coast, he made several trips aboard a C-54 to the Southwest Pacific.   Sgt. GARRETT wears the Good Conduct Medal, the American Theater of Operations Ribbon, the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Operations Ribbon with 4 stars representing the battles of Leyte, Okinaw, Luzon, and Japan, and the Victory Ribbon.  He was discharged with a total of 61 points.  After a few days with homefolks, Jack, as we all know him, will return to his old job in Sterling, Ill.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 29, 1945 – “Sgt. Marvin GARRETT, son of Mr. and Mrs. B.O. GARRETT, who arrived home Nov. 17, after receiving his discharge from the Army Air Corps at Chanute Field that day.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

(V-101)                                                   Floyd Garrett                                                        (V-102)

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - May 17, 1951 - "Wounded in Korea: Mr. and Mrs. Bert GARRETT received a letter from their son, Floyd GARRETT Sunday morning in which he stated that he had been slightly wounded by shrapnel.  At the time of writing the letter, he had recovered enough that he was again on his way to the front lines."

 

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 16, 1951 – “Sgt. Floyd GARRETT, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bert GARRETT, arrived home last week after spending the past 3 years in Japan and Korea.  He is enjoying a 30 day furlough after which he will receive his discharge.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 27, 1951 – “- Helen ROBB and Floyd GARRETT Married in Mt. Vernon Last Thursday Morning: On Thursday morning, Sept. 20th, in Mt. Vernon, Ill., occurred the marriage of Miss Helen ROBB and Mr. Floyd GARRETT.  Mrs. GARRETT is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thurman ROBB and is employed as an operator in the local exchange of the Bell Telephone Co.  Mr. GARRETT is the son of Mr. and Mrs. B.O. GARRETT.  He received his discharge from the army on Sept. 6, after serving for 3 years, the last year being in Korea.  Both Mr. and Mrs. GARRETT are graduates of the local high school with the class of ‘46.   For the present time they will reside in the apartment in the Zella NEAVILL home.  We join their many friends in extending congratulations.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec.  6, 1951 – “- Sgt. Floyd GARRETT Awarded Bronze Star Medal for Heroism in Action in Korea: SFC Floyd GARRETT of Kinmundy has been awarded the Bronze Star Medal with “V” device for heroism in action in Korea.  GARRETT distinguished himself on June 6, 1951 near Sangsar-ri where his unit, Company E of the 7th Infantry Regiment was attacking Hill 705.  His citation states, in part:  “The 3rd Platoon (of Company E) was pinned down by intense enemy automatic weapons fire.  Knowing that artillery support could not be utilized for fear of hitting the pinned down unit, Sergeant GARRETT, a member of the 4th platoon voluntarily braved the heavy fire in an effort to reach a forward position and director mortar fire upon the entrenched foe.  Although painfully wounded before reaching the position, he continued to crawl forward and, upon reaching it, brought effective mortar fire upon the hostile emplacement silencing the automatic weapons.  Sergeant GARRETT’s superb heroism and courageous initiative reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.”  Sgt. GARRETT received his discharge from the army Sept. 6th last.”

 


(V-285) Darrell Garrett

 

(V-415) Darrell Cecil Garrett

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 15, 1958 – “Army PFC Darrell C. GARRETT, son of Mr. and Mrs. Cecil GARRETT, Kinmundy, recently participated in annual firing practice with the 443d Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion on the shores of the Baltic Sea in Northern Germany (Wiesbaden).  GARRETT, a jeep driver in the battalion’s Battery C., entered the Army in May 1957, and received Basic training at Ft. Carson, Colo.  He was stationed at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo., before arriving in Europe last October.  The 23 year old soldier is a 1952 graduate of Kinmundy H.S.  He was employed by the Peoria Caterpillar Tractor Co., Peoria, in civilian life.”

 


 

Donald Garrett - “The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 28, 1954 – “Mr. and Mrs. Cecil GARRETT spent last week enroute to Fort Eustis, Va. were their son, Donald E. GARRETT, received a discharge from the army on Thursday.” 

 


 

 

 

 

 

James Emmett Garrett

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 31, 1946 –“Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT received a telegram from their son, Emmitt, who has been overseas for some time, stating that he was boarding a train for Jefferson Barracks.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 7, 1946 –“Swift School: Cpl. Emmitt GARRETT arrived home last week after receiving his discharge.  He was in the service 38 months and will spend 2 months with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank GARRETT, before returning to his old job in Granite City.  Welcome Home, Emmitt.”

 

'Emmett was drafted into the Army in 1942 and after basic training at Camp Breckenridge, Kentucky, Tennessee Maneuvers and Camp Rucker, Alabama, he was shipped to Hawaii where he trained for jungle and amphibious combat. Then President Truman intervened. As Emmett recalled "we had all this amphibious and jungle combat training and in the first week of August 1945, we made a landing on an uninhabited island. Once we hit the island, we waited. Eventually, the Navy came ashore and said for everybody to return to their ship but we didn't know why. It was soon announced to us that the atomic bomb had been dropped on Japan. That was followed by the Armistice on Aug 15. Then we were sent on to Japan as Occupational Forces and I was one of the first soldiers that set foot in Japan. President Truman saved my life that day by dropping the bomb."  Emmett was discharged from the Army in 1946 at Jefferson Barracks.'  (This was an excerpt from Emmett's obituary in 2013.)

 


 

 

 

 

 

(V-22) Carroll "Mac" Garrett  

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 9, 1954 – “In Okinawa: Army Pvt. Carroll M. GARRETT, son of Mr. and Mrs. Carroll GARRETT of Kinmundy, recently arrived at Fort Buckner, Okinawa for duty with the Rysom Signal Service. Pvt. GARRETT, a member of Company A, entered the Army last May.” 

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - May 10, 1956:

Mac GARRETT SP3 U.S. Army returned home Thursday after receiving his discharge May 2.  He has spent the past 18 months in Okinawa.  Mac is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Carroll GARRETT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Tom Garrett  

(V-25 & V-418)) Tom Garrett (82nd Airborne - U.S. Army - WWII)

 


 

(V-375) Benard B. Gaston

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-72)  Robert Geiler

 

"The Kinmundy Express” – May 21, 1953 – “Robert D. GEILER, whose wife, Dorothy, and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry GEILER live in Kinmundy, was recently promoted to private first class with the 724th Transportation Railway Operating Battalion in Korea. Pvt. 1st Class GEILER, a railway switchman in Co. C., entered the Army in Jan. 1952, and was stationed in Ft. Eustia, Va. before arriving overseas.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 24, 1953 – “Pvt. Robert GEILER arrived home Sunday on a Christmas furlough, awaiting a discharge from the Army. He has been stationed in Korea.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

(V-374)  Basil Gentry

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 29, 1945 – “T4 Christy GENTRY, son of Mr. and Mrs. S.W. GENTRY, arrived home Nov. 10, after receiving his discharge at Ft. Sheridan on Nov. 18th.  He was the only member of the famous 33rd Division from Kinmundy to receive his discharge at Fort Sheridan.  Christy entered the service April 16, 1941, and shipped overseas July 8, 1943, landing in Hawaii.  From there he went to New Guinea, then to the Netherlands East Indies, then to Luzon, then to Japan.   He started home Oct. 30, and landed in Van Couver, Nov. 11.  Sgt. GENTRY wears the Good Conduct Medal, the American Defense Ribbon, the American Theater Ribbon, the Victory Ribbon, the Philippine Liberation Ribbon, The Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with 2 stars, representing the Luzon and New Guinea Campaigns, and the Unit Citation.  As to his future, Christy says in all probability, he will go on to school.”

 

 

 

 

 

(V-255b)  Christy Gentry

 


 

 

(V-376)  Clayton Gentry

 


 

Bill Gentry - “The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 14, 1954 – “Local Items from Last Week: Cpl. Bill GENTRY arrived home Sunday to spend furlough with his father, Shelley GENTRY, before receiving his discharge.  He has been stationed in Panama for 18 months.” 

 


 

Clayton Shelly Gentry

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 30, 1945 – “Camp Wolters, Texas - Pvt. Clayton Shelly GENTRY, 18, son of Shelly W. GENTRY of Kinmundy, has arrived at this Infantry Replacement Training Center to begin his basic training as an Infantryman.  He has been assigned to a battalion stressing rifle.”

 


 

Retus B. Gentry

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 27, 1945 – “Pvt. Retus B. GENTRY, son of Mr. and Mrs. Retus GENTRY, of Kinmundy, has won the right to wear the “Boots and Wings” of the U.S. Army Paratroops.  He has completed 4 weeks of jump training during which time he made 5 jumps, the last a tactical jump at night involving a combat problem on landing.  Jumping at The Parachute School has steadily developed to a recognized war science.  American paratroopers have been recognized throughout the world for their meritorious actions against the enemy.  In addition to producing jumpers, Parachute Specialist Training is given to qualified men in communications, Demolition, Riggers and Parachute Maintenance, vital skills for Airborne Troops.”

 


(V-420) Charles Junior Gordon and wife, with Maxey Spencer on the right. February, 1944 - Loredo, Texas

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-73) Lawrence Gottman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

John L. Grant

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 28, 1968 – “Army Private John L. GRANT, 20, son of Mrs. Maurine Grant of Kinmundy, completed a wheeled-vehicle mechanic course March 15 at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo.”  

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 11, 1968 – “Army Specialist 4 John L. GRANT, 21, son of Mrs. Marcine Grant, Kinmundy, was assigned June 20 as an auto repairman in the 51st Light Maintenance Co. near Can Tho Vietnam.”

 


 

Ronald L. Grant - “The Kinmundy Express” – April 2, 1964 – “Ronald L. GRANT, 18, son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Grant of Kinmundy, completed basic training March 13 at the Naval training center, Great Lakes, Ill.”

 


 

Bennie Gray

“The Kinmundy Express” – Apr. 12, 1951 – “Bennie GRAY, of the Army Air Force, is spending a few days with his brother and family, the Richard GRAYS.  GRAY, who has been at Las Vegas, Nev., has been transferred to Scott Field.”

 


 

 

 

(V-256b) Harry Gray, Jr.

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - June 29, 1944" - "Here’s one from Pvt. Harry GRAY, Jr., who is also in England. He says: I am now in the E.T.O. (England). It is not a bad place to be because a lot of the boys are in a lot worse places. Well, I received my first Kinmundy paper and was sure glad to get it. I like to read the Zatso and the service boys letters. Also have some pals that like to read the paper too. Most boys in the service think being overseas is a bad thing and don’t want to come across. But I sure have seen a lot of things since I left home. I have been in Ireland, Scotland, and England. All 3 are very pretty countries. I sure enjoyed the boat ride over too. I never saw so much water in my whole life, than when I came across. It was kind of a rough trip, but I made out pretty well outside of days when I was seasick. Before we got on the boat, the Red Cross gave us a cup of coffee and something to eat also when we got off. So I think the Red Cross helps the boys in the service a lot. The people here are pretty nice to us soldiers, so we have a pretty nice time when we go on pass. But the funny part about it, I have never been on pass since I have been over here. Every time I think I will go out I change my mind and instead write my wife a letter. There is one thing I don’t like about the E.T.O., we have to sew and wash our own clothes, so the army as a whole makes a pretty good girl out of you. There are a lot of things I would like to tell you about, but you know I can’t. But when the D day is over and the boys come marching home, maybe we can tell you more about it then. Well, I can’t write very good, but maybe you can read this some way. I want to thank you again for the paper and keep them coming am always glad to get it. So good bye and keep the old home town a going."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 4, 1945 – “Pvt. Harry GRAY, Jr., arrived here Monday to spend a 45 day furlough with his wife and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry GRAY, Sr. and family.  Harry entered the service Sept. 8, 1943, and sailed overseas March 22, 1944.  He later went to Scotland, England and on July 14th, entered France with the 4th Armored Division.  At Rushing Court in Northern France, on Sept. 27, he was wounded in the right knee by shrapnel.  He was sent to a hospital in England where his wound healed.  He was then assigned to the 1259th Military Police Division and on March 12, 1945, went back to France and was stationed at Abbeyville.  On May 18th he sailed for Trinidad and from there to British Guinea.  He left there by plane on Sept. 19th and arrived in Miami, Fla., the following day.  Pvt. GRAY wears the Infantryman’s badge,  Good Conduct Medal, the American Theater of Operations Ribbon, the European Theater of Operations Ribbon with 2 stars, representing the battles of Normandy and Northern France, and the Purple Heart.  After the expiration of his furlough he will report back to Miami where he has been assigned to the Army Transport Command.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 21, 1965 –“They are trained and ready to meet the new face of war…”, said the “Big Red One” commander, Jam. Gen. Jonathan O. Seaman, as PFC Jerry E. GRAY debarked in Vietnam with other members of the 1st Infantry Division.  Son of Paul H. Gray, Kinmundy, Gray is assigned as a driver with the division which was ordered to duty there as a result of President Johnson’s announced troop build-up in Vietnam.  Gray received basic training at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., and was last stationed at Ft. Riley, Kansas.  The 22-year-old soldier is a 1960 graduate of Kinmundy-Alma High School.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-361) Jerry E. Gray -  Basic Training Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri

 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 2, 1965 – “Sp/4 Jerry E. GRAY is now in Viet Nam.”

 

(V-362) Jerry E. Gray (center) - Air Strip Phouc Vinh, South Viet Nam

 

 

(V-363) Jerry E. Gray -  Phouc Vinh, South Viet Nam M 60 Machine Gun -  Dec. 20, 1965

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 30, 1965 – “The Kinmundy Woman’s Club recently had the pleasure of hearing from one of our boys in Viet Nam, SP/4 Jerry E. GRAY. His note read as follows:

“Received your package today.  Was very pleased to get it.  I can use it.  It gives all of us a very warm feeling to know the people at home are behind us.  Thanks you each and every one very much.   Jerry”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 10, 1966 – “A welcome home super will be held in the American Legion Hall, Sat., March 12th at 7:00 p.m. in honor of Jerry GRAY, who arrived here Monday, March 7th, from Viet Nam, where he had been since last September.  The supper will be a potluck and everyone is welcome.  Please bring your own table service.”

 


 

Richard Gray - “The Kinmundy Express” – June 21, 1945 – “Richard GRAY, S1c, arrived home Tuesday night, to spend a 30 day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lavern GRAY in Alma, and with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert GRAY in this city.  Dick entered the Navy on April 13, 1944.  After completing his boot training at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station, he was sent to the Southwest Pacific.  And although he has served just a little more than a year, he wears the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with 2 stars, representing the battles of Iwa Jima and Pelu and the Philippine Liberation Ribbon with 2 stars representing the battles of Leyte and Luzon.”

 


 

Robert Gray

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 24, 1953 – “S/Sgt. Robert GRAY arrived home Sunday, having received his discharge from the Air Force. He had been in Japan for 10 months.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 1, 1956 – “After reenlisting in the army for 6 years, Specialist First Class Robert A. GRAY of Kinmundy was congratulated in Japan by Maj. Gen. George B. PEPLOE, deputy chief of staff in the personnel section of headquarters Army Forces, Far East and Eighth Army.  Specialist GRAY, whose wife, Margaret, and children, live in Kinmundy, is secretary to general staff.  He is a veteran of WWII.  The son of Leland L. GRAY, Kinmundy, he graduated in 1942 from Kinmundy Community H.S.  (A picture of Leland GRAY and PEPLOE was included.)” 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 30, 1959 – “SP6 and Mrs. Robert A. GRAY and sons arrived here July 22 after spending the past 3 years in Japan and Hawaii.  They are visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Guy BARBEE and other relatives.”

 


 

Carl Green - “The Kinmundy Express” – March 7, 1946 –“Sgt. Carl GREEN, son of W.L. GREEN, arrived home Sunday after receiving his discharge at Ft. Douglas, Salt Lake City, Utah, on Feb. 5th.  Sgt. GREEN entered the service July 25, 1942 and spent 18 months in Salt Lake City and 2 years in California with the Army Services Forces.  He wears the Good Conduct Medal, the American Theater Ribbon and the Victory Ribbon.  He intends to return to school in the near future.

- Mr. and Mrs. John McCULLEY were very pleasantly surprised last Wednesday evening.  Friends and relatives gave them a charivari and shower.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

(V-257b) James Green

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 20, 1945 – “Sgt. James GREEN arrived here Monday to spend a 30 day furlough with his wife and daughter and his sister, Mrs. J.H. DISS and family.  Sgt. GREEN entered the service March 2, 1942 and shipped overseas Oct. 11, 1944, landing in England.  From there he went to Borneville, France, where he was stationed in a hospital.  After the patients had been transported back to the States, his unit was billed to go direct to the Southwest Pacific.  But with the close of the war with Japan, his unit left France on Sept. 1, and headed for the states, landing in New York Sept. 12.  Sgt. GREEN wears the Good Conduct Medal and the European Theater of Operations Ribbon.  Sgt. and Mrs. GREEN (nee Anna V. ROHRBOUGH) have a 3 year old daughter, Ruth Ann.  After the expiration of his furlough, he will be sent to Camp Siebert, Ala.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 27, 1945 – “Sgt. James GREEN, who arrived home Sept. 16 to visit his family after spending the past 11 months in England and France.  After the expiration of his 30 day furlough, he will be sent to Camp Siebert, Ala." 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Keith Green - “The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 18, 1945 – “Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. R.H. GREEN received a letter from their son, Keith, saying he would be leaving the states for overseas the 22nd of the month.”

 


 

Leroy Green - “The Kinmundy Express” – June 13, 1946 –“Leroy GREEN, Yeoman 2c, son of Mr. and Mrs. R.H. GREEN, residing northwest of Kinmundy, arrived home on June 8, with a discharge from the Navy at Schomaker, Calif. Separation Center.  Leroy entered the Navy on April 25, 1944.  He received his Boot Training at Great Lakes, being dispatched from there to Corpus Christi, Texas.  After 2 months in Texas, he was sent to Port Hueneme, Calif., where he was attached to the Marine Corps he did quite a bit of globe-trotting, leaving California, Nov. 10, 1944 on to Pearl Harbor, Iwa Jima, back to Hawaii, to Japan.  Leroy hit the states on Dec. 10, 1945, where he received a 30 day leave after which he reported back to St. Louis.  His next stop was Schomaker, Calif., then to Fleet Training Center, Treasurer Island, to Damage Control School on to the Schomaker, Calif. Separation Center.  Leroy was employed as a telegrapher for the Illinois Central R.R. before entering the service.  As to what he wants to do now, he is undecided.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-258b) Lyle Green

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 13, 1945 – “1st Lt. Lyle GREEN, son of W.L. GREEN, residing west of this city, and wife arrived here Nov. 29, to visit home folks.  Lyle entered the service March 14, 1943, and received his commission as a First Lieut. in the Air Corps.  He shipped overseas Oct. 5, 1944, landing in Scotland.  Here he was assigned to the Ferry Command, flying cargo and passengers.  He started home Oct. 5, 1945, and landed Oct. 13, at Morrison Field, West Palm Beach, Fla.  From there he was sent to Ft. Lewis, Wash., where he received his discharge on Nov. 8.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

(V-150) Tim Green

 


 

W.I. Green

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois - Jan. 16, 1919

 “Somewhere in France”; Dec. 16

 Dear Mrs. Reynolds;

It is with much sorrow that I have today learned of your loss and in this feeble way, extend you my heartfelt sympathy.  As you know, I have known Willie since early childhood and his life was such that it should be a beacon light blazing a path straight enough that any of us should be proud to follow it.  Your boy was one against whom I have never heard a word spoken.  I have always enjoyed myself in his company and I assure you that I have many times thought and looked forward to the time when this terrible war should cease and we would be able to return home to meet again and spend many more happy hours together.  He did his bit and gave his all in defense of his and our flag.  It must be a great blow to you and Bertha to give him up, but there is a guide for us all which says, “The Lord giveth and the Lord taketh away.  Blessed he the name of the Lord.”

Many mothers in America will yearn for boys who have come over here and will never return.  Only yesterday, a trainload of boys coming from the front was wrecked in town, killing one and wounding12 others.  The loss in this war to America is great but it is only slight compared with what it is in the countries over here.

The war is over now and the boys are beginning to start home.  There will be many happy reunions.  The reunion you have been planning can never be, but you must be brave and bear the burden and fight on, for when the burden of life for you is ended and the summons of “Come” is sounded, you can look across to the other shore, and see a bright shining star which Willie has palneted there to lead you home.  May these few words of sympathy cheer you on your lonely road.

 Pvt. W.I. GREEN; 2ND Co. O  R.S.D., A.P.O. 741

 

 

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois – March 27, 1919

St. Loubes, France – February 15

Mrs. T.M. JONES:

Dear Sister,

           Will write you a few lines as I haven’t much to do.  I came down here last Sunday.  Have been having some fine weather but it is raining today.  We are billeted in private buildings, 12 miles north of Bordeaux.  This is a very beautiful part of France.  They don’t raise much here but grapes.  The climate is very delightful.  Fruit trees and flowers are blooming.  This week has been like early oat sowing.

           We were sure glad to get of the mud at Meheen and living here almost changes ones mind about France.  We went thru the delouser at Mehun and stand in the evacuation camp 2 weeks after we were ready to start and we are here now with seemingly good chances of staying here several weeks, but if it doesn’t rain too much I can stay here pretty well satisfied.  Of course I am anxious to get started home.  I got a letter from Milbourn written January 23, he was well and having a good time.  From the paper I suppose that Pres. Wilson sails for the U.S. today.  It may be some time before peace is established.  It is a monstrous problem to settle.  There are many things to take into consideration.  England may want several things but I don’t think they will be unreasonable.  The main thing I don’t like is that the Kaiser is alive and practically free.  I will not be satisfied till he is taken care of.  That domineering spirit of the Germans is not yet broken.  I have talked to some prisoners since coming here.  They blame England for starting the war and say they’ll be ready to fight France again in 20 years.  So you see peace is not here.  They are confident that they would have won the war by now if the U.S. had stayed out.  I would hate to think that any time in the next generation or two there could be a repetition of all this suffering.  There are many things we can tell when we get home that it might be best not to write.  I hope everybody is well at home.  If nothing happens, I will be home this spring.  I am having a good time and am not worrying about anything.  Can’t think of much to write so will close.

                  Cpl. W.L. GREEN - 17th Ord.  Cas Co., Ohio

 


 

Raymond A. Griffin -  “The Kinmundy Express” – June 11, 1953 – “Pvt. Raymond A. GRIFFIN, whose wife, Pearl, lives in Centralia, was recently assigned to the 25th Infantry Division in Korea. The 25th landed in July 1950, shortly after the communists attacked the Republic of South Korea. Private GRIFFIN, a mechanic, entered the army last October and received basic training at Ft. Riley, Kansas before arriving in Korea on Apr. 26. He is a 1949 graduate of Kinmundy H.S., and a former employee of Griffin’s Garage in Alma. His parents are Mr. and Mrs. Lester W. GRIFFIN on Rt. 1, Alma.”

 


 

(V-113) Dick Hall

 


 

Herbert W. Hall

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 21, 1951 – “- Pfc. Herbert HALL of Roswell, N.M., is enjoying a furlough here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed HALL.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 3, 1952 – “PFC Herbert HALL left Sunday night to return to New Mexico, after spending a Christmas furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed HALL and family.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 9, 1965 – “S/Sgt. Herbert W. HALL is now stationed on Tai Wan Island near Viet Nam.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 22, 1968 – “Technical Sergeant Herbert W. HALL, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward E. Hall of Kinmundy, has received his second award of the U.S. Air Force Commendation Medal at Sheppard AFB, Tex.  Sergeant Hall was decorated for meritorious service while assigned as an aircraft engine technician at Tan Son Nhut, AB, Vietnam.  He was cited for his outstanding knowledge and leadership which contributed to the success of the Air Force mission in Southeast Asia.  The sergeant is presently at Sheppard with a unit of the Air Training Command.  He is a graduate of Kinmundy High School.  His wife, Esther, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Otto M. Blair of Edgewood.” (A picture was included with this article.)

 


 

(V-64) Jack Hall

 


 

(V-77) Jim Hall

 


 

Milton Hall 

“The Kinmundy Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois – Dec. 26, 1917"

Bensonhurst, NY

 

Mrs. Clarence GRAY

Dear Aunt and Uncle,

Just received your letter and was very glad to hear from you.  It found me feeling fine.  I sure answered the call and am not one bit sorry for it and will try to make good, even if it costs me my life.  We turned our ship over to the French Government in Brooklyn, N.Y., and we are awaiting orders to sail. We are sure getting all the drilling we want but do not know just how long we will be here.  Is Ben Craig still at home?  If you see him tell him the battleship he was on is in harbor at Brooklyn, N.Y.  It is the U.S.S. Tennessee, others are there also, U.S.S. New York, Arizona, Indiana, Wyoming.  They are also building one fine ship, the New Mexico.  It is not yet complete, they just have the guns mounted; it is going to be better than the Arizona.  I know you will be glad to learn about the large ships.  Say aunt, a box of eats will sure be good for Christmas and uncle, I smoke Bull Durham.

            It is lovely weather here for the 6th of December.  I think the next move we make will be to Delaware and get another sub-chaser and perhaps take it across.  This U.S. Navy is some life.  Every way one looks here, he sees a war ship, and when I come back and see you, I can tell you lots of things, for one sure learns a lot here.

 

Milton L. HALL - Sec. Base; No. 6; Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, N.Y.

 

 

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – Jan. 17, 1918

 Brooklyn, N.Y.; December 27, 1917

 

Mr. and Mrs. C. GRAY,

Dear Uncle and Aunt,

Just a few lines to let you know that I have left Bensonhurst and am in Brooklyn, N.Y. on the U.S.S.C.  It is a fine ship and will be complete in a few days when we go to New London, Conn. for a week or two for gun practice and then across.   That is the latest dope we got.  I am taking up wireless during my spare time for I want to learn all I can while I have the chance.  They told me if I wanted to study it, all it took was brains and I think I have a few left.  It is so cold up here and as far as the eye can see is war ships, battleships, torpedo ships and in fact, every kind that is known.  We have two big cannons on our ship besides machine guns.  It is 110 feet long and will make four miles per hour.  It is a submarine chaser.  The only thing I don’t like is that it rocks so much, but I have only been sea sick once and that was going through the Wellen Canal at Fort Dalhause, Canada.  We would get into the locks and drop from the surface all the way from 10 to 65 feet, but when we hit the Hudson River we had fine sailing.  The Red Cross gave us some heavy clothes which we sure appreciate, sweaters, underwear, socks which are all hand knit.  I also have four pairs of blankets and a hammock so I can rock myself to sleep now.  Was Charley WOODS and Ray WHITE drafted?  Our Captain is fine; he bought the crew one thousand cigarettes, so guess we will smoke for awhile.  I go to school three hours a day learning wireless and it is just like school in the city or town; we can not whisper or raise a fuss; if we do they restrict our liberty.  It is getting time for mess and I hear, “Hit the decks for chow,” I will close.  Answer real soon and tell me all the news from home.

               Your loving nephew, Milton HALL; U.S.S. Co. 80; Brooklyn, N.Y., Navy Yards

 

 

 

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – June 13, 1918;

 

April 24, 1918; U.S.S.C. 80

Dear Aunt and Uncle;

            Just a few lines to let you know that I am still alive.  We have been on the sea for ten days and there is no land in sight yet but we hope to get there in a few more days.  We have had fine weather ever since we left but tonight the old Atlantic Ocean is rather rough, so excuse this bum writing for this Sub Chaser is trying to stand on her head.  I have not received any mail since I left the U.S. and that been near a month.

            After we complete this two thousand mile trip we have another thousand miles before we are over there.  Crossing the Atlantic on a 110 ft. ship is by no means a pleasure trip.  It looks very much like a storm tonight.  All I can see is clouds.  There are many ships in the fleet that is going our way and as yet we have not seen any submarines, but we have been in the war zone for the last two days.  Well Aunt will finish this letter just as soon as I get to shore for I am sure anxious to see some more land. 

            This is April 25  and no land in sight.  The sea has been very rough for the past 24 hours, but it has begun to calm down.  It rained last night and altogether the weather was very disagreeable but tonight is somewhat moderate. There is not much excitement in the war zone just at the present time. They say that the Spanish language only is spoken at the next place we stop, and after that it will be all French and I hope I will meet some of the Kinmundy boys when I get over there.  Today is Thursday and it is sure a gloomy one.  I feel rather tired or lazy.  I suppose the censor will get tired of reading this letter but -  I should worry.

            April 26 – Nothing doing on land yet and sea, it very calm and the weather is like summer.  We had pancakes this morning for breakfast and every one ate a good portion.  We have plenty of smokes with us as our captain gave the drew forty thousand cigarettes before we left the States.  Some sport, I’ll say, he is.  It has begun to look like rain again tonight and the sea is getting a bit rough but it has been smooth all day.

            Well this is April ___ and we reached land yesterday evening,  I went ashore last night and I like the place fine though I can’t speak their language.  There are many liquor houses here and the drinks are served by girls who call themselves Bar Maids.  Wine is sold at three cents a glass.  The island is thirty seven miles long and 8 miles wide.  The weather here is never cold.  The scenery is very nice and they grow lots of pineapples and oranges.  Pineapples here are worth about five cents each.   I don’t think we will be here long but I like it fine.  It is raining here today but it is warm.  Our next trip will be about a thousand miles and then I hope we are finished for a while.  Well must close for this time so goodbye to all and write soon.

      As ever, your loving nephew - M.L. HALL

 

 

 “Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – July 4, 1918;

At Sea; U.S.S.C. 80; May 22

   Dear Aunt and Uncle;

            I will drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well.  We have left port and we are on our way to another place.  We were out on a submarine chaser just before we left and it proved very successful.  Those two German subs will never sail again.

            We have not seen land for several days.  The Ocean was rather rough but this sea is very calm.  We expect to reach our next port in a few days and then I will mail this.  I received my first mail just before we sailed and there was one letter from you.  It was dated March 29 and I received it May 16.  We only stay in one place a few days for we are in active service all the time now.  I wish that this war was over and I could be back in Chicago for Sherman was sure right when he said that War is Hell.   I do not think very much of Europe and it does not compare at all with the U.S.  I left the U.S. Easter Sunday and it seems years since. 

            I am, as ever, your loving nephew,  M.L. HALL

 

 

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois – March 13, 1919         

__dato, Austria – Feb. 7, 1919

Dear Aunt and Uncle – Just a few lines to let you know I am well.  I have been transferred to one of the battleships the U.S. has taken charge of by the name of Rodetzky.  Every place here looks alike to me.  The reason I have not written sooner is on account of no stationery, which is one of the things that is very scarce here.

           I got sea sick last week for the first time in ten months, but the old sea was very rough and the big waves would come over the ship and give us a salt water bath every few minutes.  Say, I would almost sell my shoes for some American tobacco.  I wrote mama last night and tried to cheer her up.  I have just finished washing my clothes and that is one job at which I am a professional. 

This ship is some big one.  I go ashore about twice a week and the next time I go will send you some postcards.  I am going over to Salora, Austria, Sunday and look at the old ruins.  The town was destroyed about fifteen hundred years ago, but the ruins are still there.  I have seen Europe, but I prefer the U.S.A. for mine as that is the only place for me. 

           Have you looked on the map and seen the places I have been.  Be sure and look in the northwestern part of Greece and find Carfu Isalands; that is where I spent the summer.  Start looking for Bermuda, and follow it like this: Azores Isalnds, Gibralter, Malta Islands, Carfu, Greece, Albania, Rome, Italy, Lyons, France, Durrazo, Spolato, Austria, and then you can see where I have been and that is only about one half of the places.  All our accounts are back in the U.S.A., so that means when we leave here we will go direct to the states and I will be glad to get back.  These European cities are awful; they are dirty and the people take no pride in themselves.  Everything here is very expensive; the cheapest soap that we can buy is $1 per bar.  We pay 15 kronen and each kronen is worth 6 cents, so you can imagine what it costs us to keep our clothes clean and take a bath every day.  The cigarettes we buy cost $4.00 a hundred and they taste like dry grass.  I do not know just how long we will stay here but hope our time is short.  I have received no letters for three months, the last one was dated Nov. 20. 

   Must close dear aunt with love.

              M.L. HALL - Roedtzky, European Waters - Care of U.S. Olympia; Care P.M., N.Y. City

 


 

 Richard Hall - “The Kinmundy Express” – June 21, 1951 – “- Cpl. Richard HALL arrived here Saturday to enjoy a 30-day furlough.  He has been stationed in Japan and was flown home on account of the death of his niece, Linda Sue HALL.”

 


 

Robert Douglas Hall

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 26, 1956 – “Robert D. HALL, 18, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward E. HALL of Kinmundy, and Clyde W. HAYS, 18, son of Mr. and Mrs. William P. HAYS of Alma, have both enlisted in the U.S. Air Force.  They enlisted under the “buddy system” plan which assures them of remaining together during their basic training.” 

  

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 9, 1958 – “Airman Robert Douglas HALL killed in auto accident Saturday in Atlanta, Texas: Mr. and Mrs. Ed HALL of Alma received a message Saturday announcing the death of their son, Robert Douglas HALL, which had occurred early that morning.  He was stationed at Foster Air Force Base at Victoria, Texas.  He and a buddy, Airman James WEST, were returning to the base when they had a head on collision with Another car at Atlanta, Texas.  HALL was pinned in his car while WEST was thrown free.  His body arrived in Kinmundy, and services will be held from the Linton Funeral Home this afternoon, Rev. Forrest CROUCH of Alma, officiating.  Interment will be in Evergreen Cemetery.  Besides his parents, surviving are 8 brothers and sisters: James, Edgewood; Roy, Kinmundy; Jack, Alma; Dick, Texas; Herbert, Rantoul; Helen NASH, Iola; and Leona and Freddie, at home.  Also his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene KEEN, and Mr. and Mrs. James BRIM of Kinmundy.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Glenn Hamilton

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 4, 1952 – “Word was received last week by Mrs. Glenn HAMILTON that her husband had arrived at Camp Drake Japan on the 14th of August. He left there for Korea on the 17th of August. Pvt. HAMILTON entered the service on Feb. 11, 1952, and took his training at Ft. Riley, Kansas. Mrs. HAMILTON is the former Jean SPURLIN, formerly of this city.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 8, 1953 – “Pfc. G. HAMILTON Killed in Action in Korea, Dec. 22: Mrs. Jean HAMILTON, the former Jean SPURLIN of this city, received a telegram from the Sec. of the Army that her husband, Pfc. Glenn E. HAMILTON, had been killed in action in Korea on Dec. 22. The telegram stated that further details would follow by letter. No further word has, however, been received by Mrs. HAMILTON as of yet. On Dec. 29, both Mrs. HAMILTON and her mother, Mrs. W.T. SPURLIN received letters from Glenn dated on Dec. 21 in which he wished for them a Merry Christmas. Mrs. HAMILTON is now making her home with her parents on South Eight Street, Vandalia. Pfc. HAMILTON only recently was present the Combat Infantryman Badge for excellent performance of duty under enemy fire in Korea. He was serving with the 40th Infantry Division and had been in Korea since July 1. He was born near St. James and would have been 23 years old on Jan. 2nd. He attended the St. Elmo H.S. At the time he entered service on Feb. 11, 1952, he was employed by the Robinson Drilling Co. Previously he had been employed at the J.S. & S. shoe factory and the Wides Oil Station in Vandalia. On July 3, 1948, he was married to Miss Jean SPURLIN. Besides his wife, he leaves his mother, Mrs. John REYNOLDS of St. James, and a sister, Mrs. Bernice BOLYARD of Bluff City.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 19, 1953 – “Funeral services for PFC Glen Eugene HAMILTON, age 23, who was killed in Korea on Dec. 22, 1952, will be held Feb. 22 in the Christian Church in Vandalia. Interment will be in Fairlawn Cemetery. He was the son of Loren HAMILTON and Mrs. Fay HAMILTON REYNOLDS of Vandalia. He was born in St. James, Ill. on Dec. 30, 1929, and married Jean SPURLIN, formerly of Kinmundy, and now residing in Vandalia, on July 3, 1948. He leaves his parents; his wife, Jean; and one sister, Mrs. Bernice BOLYARD, Bluff City. Glen was a member of the Macedonia Christian Church. He entered the U.S. Armed Services Feb. 11, 1952, and a member of the 40th division, 223rd Infantry Division. “

 


 

Ray E. Hamilton

 

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – July 25, 1918;

Camp Laurel, Md.;  July 2nd, 1918

 Dear Editor,

            As requested, I will write and tell you and perchance some of my friends about my experiences in the arm.  I arrived in Jefferson Barracks Thursday morning early on May 29th.  I reported and was standing around waiting to be assigned to my tent when up walked Harry NEIL and I sure was glad to see him.  On Friday morning we took the examination together, we were seven hours going through the examination.  All kinds of contrivances were used to find our physical disabilities but we both passed successfully.  We were separated after examination as he was in the quartermaster corp and I in the engineers.  We did everything at the barracks from showing more rookies through the examining room to picking up scrap of paper.

            A couple of days later Harry and I were going to the Y.M.C.A. when we ran across Mack LOWE and we gave him a royal welcome you can bet for seeing a friend from your home town in the army is better than seeing a dozen on the town streets.  There were thousands of drafted and enlisted men coming in there every day and soon it became so crowded that many slept out in the open thus being initiated directly into real army life.  We got plenty to eat as they had two immense halls holding about three or four thousand each.  As I returning from ‘chow’ one noon I met Ted MILLER who had enlisted in the infantry.  From then on we were attending every formation to listen for names when they called the shipping list.  Many names we were disappointed by at last of the 7th of June, Harry and I were both called both leaving the same day, he for Jacksonville and I for Camp Laurel.   I was two nights and one day coming, stopping for 3 hours in Cincinnati and 3 hours at Washington during which time I was shown all through the capitol building and saw from a distance the exterior of the White House.   I crossed the Cumberland mountains the second night so missed seeing them but I know the train was merely creeping up  them and the air was very chilly.

            Camp Laurel is situated just half way between Washington D.C. and Baltimore, Laurel being a town of about 2000 inhabitants.  The camp is situated on the state fair grounds and we hope to have some celebration on the 4th and I guess there will also be a good one at Kinmundy.  I wish I might be there for the occasion.  I like army life fine and everyone of us are raring to go over but don’t know of course when we will get started.  We drill 4 or 5 hours every day and some times take a five mile hike and back in the morning then drill in the afternoon and if you are feeling about half sick from one of your shots in the arm it isn’t so funny by night.  I have been working in the orderly tent as clerk for the last few days and I like it fine.  I have ten young tentmates all young fellows and we certainly have some time, we have to get up at 5:40 a.m., and must have lights out and keep quite from 10 p.m. on.   It is hot here in the daytime and cold at night.  I would like to hear from my friends in Kinmundy and will try to find time to answer all letters.

            Yours till the stars and stripes float over Berlin.   

                  Ray E. HAMILTON - Co.  C  57th Engineers; Camp Laurel, Md.

 


 

Delbert Hammer

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 13, 1945 – “Sgt. Delbert HAMMER arrived here Sunday morning to visit a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Myron HAMMER and family.  Delbert entered the army July 8, 1940 and in Oct. 1941, was sent to the Aleutian Islands where he remained for almost 2 years.  In October 1943, he was permitted to spend a 15 day furlough here with his parents.  He returned to California, where he has since been stationed.  He is enroute to Ft. Sheridan where he will receive his discharge papers within the next few days.  Sgt. HAMMER wears the Good Conduct medal, the American Defense and the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbons.  Sgt. HAMMER and Miss Margaret POLLACK of Chicago were married June 7, 1944. After receiving his discharge papers, this couple will make their home in Chicago.”

 


 

Howard Hammer

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 22, 1945 – “Sgt. Howard HAMMER Arrives Home: Sgt. Howard HAMMER arrived here on Tuesday of last week to spend a much earned furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Myron HAMMER and family.  After saying hello to several of his relatives and friends, he accompanied his sister, Mrs. Ernest JONES to her home near Longview, Sunday, returning here on Tuesday.  This is Sgt. Howard’s first furlough here since he entered the army in Nov. 1940.  So you may know he is plenty glad to see home folks again.  In Sept. 1941, Sgt. Howard went aboard ship and sailed for Iceland.  Here he was stationed until November 1941 when he was shipped to England and the following month to France.  When he left France, he sailed for the good old U.S.A. and was mighty glad when he set foot on American soil again.  Sgt. Howard is attached to the M.P.’s and is a cook.  His furlough is really not termed a furlough, but a “Rest Period”, and we would say that it was a well earned rest for him.  Yes Sgt. Howard, we are all mighty glad to see you home again, even if it is only for a short stay.  Sgt. Howard has 2 brothers in the service, Sgt. Delbert HAMMER now in California, and James HAMMER, SOM2 c, now stationed at a Naval Repair Base in California.”

 


 

James Hammer

"The Kinmundy Express" - Dec. 9, 1943 - "Here’s one from James HAMMER, SO M 3c, of the U.S. Navy and is now, and has been seeing the world aboard the U.S.S. Heron. And say, Red, don’t forget that we would be mighty glad to see you as well as the other boys and girls, right here on the streets of Kinmundy. He says: I am dropping a few lines to thank you for the much appreciated paper and hope someday to repay the kindness. I showed the fellows your ‘Zatso’ column’ (I believe that is the way you spell it), and now every time I get the paper I have to show them the paper so they can read it. I have been quite a few places since I left Kinmundy but I don’t think I would trade it for any one of them. I can now get the full meaning of "Be it ever so humble there is no place like home." Since the war started, I haven’t seen many fellows from home, but one day I did meet Bob HANNA and we had a short talk and most of it was on past experiences at Kinmundy. As there is not much a fellow can write about these days, I will have to close wishing you all A Merry Christmas and A Happy New Year".

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 11, 1945 – “James HAMMER, SOM 2c, left Sunday to return to his base at San Diego, Calif., after spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Myron HAMMER and family.   They also had with them another son, Sgt. Howard HAMMER, who has recently returned from Europe a second time.  He left the first of the week for Ft. Sheridan where he expects to receive his discharge.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 25, 1946 –“James HAMMER, Sound Man Second Class, arrived home last Thursday after receiving his discharge from the Navy at San Pedro, Calif., July 13th.  He is now visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Myron HAMMER.  James enlisted in the Navy July 9, 1940, and received his boot training at Great Lakes.  From there he went to Mare Island, Vailejo, Calif., where he went aboard the USS Phoenix.  He then set sail for the southwest Pacific, visiting the Philippine and Hawaiian Islands.  He happened to be at Pearl Harbor when the Japs did their damage to that place.  He was afterwards assigned to the USS Heron, a seaplane tender and visited Australia, New Guinea, Admiralty Islands. New Maya, and New Heberdies.  He came back to the states in Oct. 1944 at which time he enjoyed a 30 day leave here with his parents.  He reported back to the U.S. Naval Repair Base at San Diego, where he remained until receiving his discharge.  He wears the American Defense Medal with 1 star representing the Battle of Pearl Harbor, the American Area Campaign Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with 2 stars representing the Battle of Pearl Harbor and the Admiralty Islands landings, and the Victory Medal.  After a little rest, James intends to start working for the Bell Telephone Co. as an apprentice electrician.”

 


 

Merle Hammer

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 29, 1945  - “PFC Merle HAMMER arrived here Sunday to spend a few days with his uncle, Bert HAMMER, and other relatives.  He will also visit in Decatur with William HAMMER, before returning to his camp.  Merle was inducted into the service Nov. 11, 1942, and after training in various camps, was shipped overseas April 28, 1943, landing in Oran, Africa.  Here he stayed until Jan. 1944, when he was sent to Italy.  He was attached to a railroad battalion.  On Nov. 7, 1944, north of Rome, one dark night while on duty, he accidentally fell in a shell hole, 20 feet deep, suffering a broken leg.  Since that time, he has been in various hospitals.  He landed back in the states Feb. 6, and was sent to Camp Pickett, Va., where he is stationed.  After being able to throw away his crutches, he was granted a 21 day furlough.  PFC Merle wear the African European Theater Ribbon with 2 stars, representing the battles of Salerno  and Leghorn.  Upon his return to camp, Merle thinks he will be assigned to duty in the states.”

 


 

Charles Hammers

 

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – Jan. 17, 1918

 Somewhere in England; December  3, 1917

 

Mrs. E. HAMMERS, Kinmundy, Ill.

 

Dear Aunt – Well, I suppose you are wondering what has become of me.  I am in England and feeling fine.  We have not been here long, we spent Thanksgiving on the ocean and it was quite different from any ever spent; we sure didn’t have turkey.  We had a much better ship than the one we started over in before; was more room and better bunks; the eats were not quite as good, but then we can’t expect all things to be as they were at home.  Everything seems so strange to us here, they are about fifty years behind the times.  The trains look like stage coaches, they are built with compartments, with doors on the side, and one of our coals cars would make at least ten of them.  We also have a time trying to count the money; we have a pocket full of money and don’t know how much we have either.  I will close now and write more later.

 

Your loving nephew,  Private Chas. HAMMERS - H.D. of Co. 168  U.S. Inf.  A.E.F. via New York

 

 

 

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – Feb. 27, 1918;

 Somewhere in France, Jan. 13, 1918

 

Mr. Lloyd HAMMERS,

Dear Cousin,

I guess you think I am never going to answer your letter of Nov. 20; I only received it last week.  I wish I could have been with you on the hunting trips, but about this time I was thinking how big the ocean was and I sure did think it was the same size before I got across.  We are having some weather; it has rained or snowed every day for a week and I am not very crazy about France from what I have seen and I sure will be glad to get back to old U.S.A.  I am sending you a copy of a poem which expresses our thoughts about the drafted men. 

                                   

Write soon with love to all, from Private Chas. HAMMERS; H.D. of Co. 168, U.S. Inf. A.E. F.

 

Only a Volunteer

The 168th Infantry will be forgotten

    In just about a year,

But the records they left behind

    Was that of a volunteer.

 

Why didn’t I wait to be drafted

    And lead to the train by a band           

Then put in a claim exemption,

    Oh!  Why did I hold up my hand?

 

Why didn’t I wait for the banquet,

    Why didn’t I wait to be cheered?

For the drafted men get the credit

     While we only volunteered.

 

But nobody gave us a banquet,

    And nobody said a kind word,

The puff of the engine and the grind of the wheels

    Was all the goodby we heard.

 

And off to the training camp hustled

    To be trained for the next half year.

And in the shuffle forgotten,

     For we were only volunteers.

 

And perhaps we shed tears as we marched away

    To the foreign fields of strife

And left behind us our happy home s

     And the girl whom we meant for our wife.

 

But we boys, every one, are glad we are here,

Tho the effort my cost us our lives

Or the coming conquest cost us dear

     We are glad we are volunteers.

 

But perhaps some day in the future

    When my boy sits on my knee

And asks what I did in the great war

    With his eyes looking up at me.

 

And I will look back in those eyes

     That at me so trustingly peer

And tell him I wasn’t drafted,

     But was only a volunteer.

 

 

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – May 2, 1918;

In active service. With the American Expeditionary Force.  Somewhere in France.

Mrs. E. HAMMER,

      Dear Aunt – I want to let you know I am still alive and well.  I got a letter from you about 2 weeks ago and you said you had sent me some packages but I did not get them.  I wish I had for we sure do get hungry for sweet things.  I got the package from Mrs. BROWN and was glad to get it.  I still have the New Testament that she gave me before I left Illinois and I carry with me all the time; tell her I will write to her just as soon as I get time.  How is Lloyd and what is he doing?  I have not heard from Paul for a long time.  They censor our letters so we cannot tell what we are doing or where we are, so it makes it hard for us to write an interesting letter, so I will close hoping to hear from you soon. 

      I remain your nephew,  Private Charles HAMMER - H.D. of 60168 V Inf.; A.E.F. via New York

 

 

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – Aug. 8, 1918 - "News from France states that Charles HAMMERS, who was recently reported severely wounded, had completely lost his eyesight for a time, but it is now slowly returning.  His many friends will be glad to know that he is on the road to recovery.”

 


Albert H. Hampsten

"The Kinmundy Express" - Sept. 10, June 29, 1942 - "Word was received Sunday by Albert H. HAMPSTEN, of Omega, that his 17 year old son, Louis Ervin HAMPSTEN, was wounded in action overseas. HAMPSTEN was a private in the United States Marines. We don’t know just where HAMPSTEN was stationed, all Mr. HAMPSTEN knows is that his mail was sent to California. But we all know this, that the "Leather Necks" are doing a good job of mopping up those little men from the rising sun in a certain bunch of islands in the south west Pacific."

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Jan. 13, 1944 - Mr. Albert HAMPSTEN received a telegram from the War Dept. on Jan. 8 stating that his son, Pvt. Louis Ervin, had been wounded in action. Pvt. HAMPSTEN is in the Marines and this is the second time he has been wounded, the first time being in early Sept. 1942. Pvt. HAMPSTEN is 19 years of age and has been in the service for more than 2 years. He is in the Southwest Pacific. The message did not state the nature of his wound.

 


 

(V-475) Glen Hampsten

 


 

Richard Hampsten

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 6, 1945 – “Omega: Richard HAMPSTEN is home from Germany on a 30 day furlough.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-74) Virgil Hampsten

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Aug. 1, 1946 - "Some 50 relatives gathered at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil HAMPSTEN in Meacham twp. on July 27th to help him celebrate his birthday. Mr. HAMPSTEN was discharged from the army last winter, after more than 3 years overseas. He was very much surprised when all the people came in."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Kenneth Hanbaum

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 23, 1945 – “Prairie Grove (from last week): Mr. and Mrs. Ernie HANBAUM received word that their son, Kenneth, had landed in the States and would soon be home.  He is in the Navy and this is his first leave in 2 years.”

 


 

Oren Hanbaum

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct.  18, 1951 – “Mr. and Mrs. Ernie HANBAUM of Meacham twp. were made extremely happy Monday when they received a letter from their son, Pvt. Oren HANBAUM, 24, in Korea, who is a prisoner of war.  Pvt. HANBAUM was reported missing on July 2.  The last time Pvt. HANBAUM was home on furlough was last Christmas.  He was then sent overseas.  This letter was written on Aug. 8 and postmarked Peking, China Sept. 12, 1951.  It came through “via the Chinese People’s Committee for World Peace and Against American Aggression, Peking, China.”  Here is the letter.”

    “Aug. 8, 1951

    N. Korea, P.O.W. Camp, No. 3;

    Dearest Mother and Dad,

    I know you have been worrying about me for the past 3 months, but Mom, you don’t need to worry any longer as I am held in a P.O.W. Camp in North Korea.  I am being held by the Chinese People’s Volunteers Forces, and by the North Korean Government.  They are giving me the best of care that they can through the facilities that they have, and I will assure you that I am still in good health too.  The Chinese People’s Volunteers Forces are really friendly class of people and have found out that they are truly a peace loving people and are striving for lasting and world peace.  They have showed as their Lenient treatment policy toward all P.O.W.’s and believe me folks, it is truly a wonderful policy.  Our living conditions are truly very good and we get all we want to eat.  They give us pork, sugar, tobacco, flour, potatoes and many other good things to eat to numerous to mention.  Folks, you can help get me home much sooner if you will write to our Congressman and have all our friends write to him also, and ask him to stop this useless war in Korea that we have come over 5000 miles away from home to fight.  Take all of the foreign troops out of Korea and let the Koreans settle their disputes among themselves.  That is the hope of me and my buddies in this camp.  So please write to him and help to get peace in Korea and all over the world, and then we can return to our loved ones once again, and be happy and right.  Keep praying mom, and God will unite us all once more when He sees the right time.  How are all the rest of the family and how is that big boy of Audrey’s and Joe’s?  Mother, please write Margaret to look for a hired hand because when I do get home, I’m going to be a farmer for the rest of my life, and I hope that I will never be drafted into the army to fight any more useless wars again.  Well, dear folks, I must close for this time as it won’t be long until chow-time again.  Tell every one to write and bye bye for now.  I love you more and more each day.”

 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 20, 1953 – “Oran HANABAUM, Kinmundy POW, Released: Mr. and Mrs. Ernie HANABAUM of Meacham twp. were informed Tuesday that their son, PFC Oran HANABAUM was among the group of prisoners of war released by the communists in exchange that day. Naturally, there was joy in this farm home as relatives and friends called to assure the family that they were happy too. Oran has been a prisoner for 27 months. During this time, his parents have had letters from him at various times. The last letter was received in May.”

 


 

(V-76) Virgil Hanes


 

(V-421) Fred Hankins

 


(V-422) Thomas Hankins

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Dean Hanks

 

        (V-336) - Dean Hanks                                                    (V-303) - Dean Hanks funeral

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Aug. 31, 1944 - "Deputy Sheriff and Mrs. Fred HANKS, now living in Salem, but formerly of Omega twp., received a message from the War Dept. last Thursday stating their eldest son, Sgt. Dean HANKS, has been missing in action in France since Aug. 8th. Inasmuch as the message read "missing", the family has hopes that he will turn up O.K in the near future. There has been cases like this and the boys would turn up later. So they still have hopes. Sgt. Dean HANKS entered the service March 25, 1942, was shipped overseas in Dec. 1943, landing in England where he was stationed until the invasion of France. He is 35 years of age. The last letter received by the family from him, was dated July 26th. Mr. and Mrs. HANKS have another son in the service also, Sgt. Donald HANKS, now stationed in Italy. They also have another son at home, Doyle. Also 3 daughters, Mrs. Eileen DYE of Fairfield, Mrs. Louise BRADY of Charleston, S.C., and Miss Fleta, who is at present in Charleston, S.C. with her sister. One son-in-law is also in the service, Lt. (jg) Theodore BRADY, now stationed in Charleston, S.C. Mr. and Mrs. HANKS have many old neighbors and friends in this community who extend to them their deepest sympathy and they are uttering prayers that the missing lad may be safe somewhere and will show up later on."

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Aug. 5, 1948 - "Rites Held Sunday for St. Dean HANKS: The casketed remains of Sgt. Dean HANKS arrived here on Tuesday morning of last week and was taken by the Linton Funeral Home where they lay in state until the funeral hour.  Funeral services were held from the Methodist Church in this city Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. Oscar HAWKINS officiating, and Rev. Orlando BRAKEMEYER, assisting.  Interment was made in the Phillips Cemetery under the auspices of Farina Lodge No. 601 A.F. & A.M.  Dean, eldest son of Fred and Eva FOGERSON HANKS, was born in Omega twp., Oct. 11, 1908.  He attained his grade school education at the Oak Park School and attended Farina High School for one year.  The following summer, he was employed by the firm of Baum & Williams, who was constructing the hard road between Laclede and Kinmundy, as a cement finisher.  He liked his work so well that upon the completion of the contract, he hired out with the firm of Burner Bros. and did the same work for 3 years.  Having a desire to see a part of the west, he went to Colorado where he was employed as a ranch foreman for 3 years.  In 1936, he returned to Illinois and was employed by the State Highway Department.  He remained in the employ of the state until he entered the army.  He entered the service March 28, 1942 and shipped across in Jan. 1944, being stationed in England until the invasion of France.  He was a member of Co. B 25th Engineer Bn., 6th Division.  He was killed in action in France Aug. 8, 1944.  He was buried in the St. James Temporary Cemetery in France.   He was a member of Farina Lodge No. 601, A.F. & A.M.  Besides his bereaved parents, he is survived by 3 sisters, Eileen DYE of Centralia, Ill.; Louise BRADY and Fleeta HANKS, Dallas, Texas; two brothers, Doyle, Pauls Valley, Okla.; and Donald, Fairfield, Ill.; five nieces and nephews, Brad, Pam and Gregg DYE and Patricia and Jane BRADY; four uncles, Grover and Roy FOGERSON and Lloyd and Guy HANKS, and one aunt, Mrs. Maude COMBS.  Sgt. HANKS had a large number of friends which was evidenced by the profuse of flowers and the large crowd which attended the funeral and grave side services." 

 


 

James Hanks - “The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 13, 1945 – “Brown: James HANKS returned home Friday morning after a discharge from the U.S. Army.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Beauford L. Hanna

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Feb. 15, 1944 - A telegram was received Tuesday by his wife stating that PFC Beauford L. HANNA was seriously wounded on Jan. 1 in action in France and details would follow. Mrs. HANNA, with her 2 children, have been making their home in Kinmundy the past several months. PFC HANNA is the son of Dr. H.L. HANNA and was inducted into the service on Nov. 17, 1943. He sailed across on June 30, 1944, landing in England. He has been stationed in France for the past month. The last letter received by his wife was dated Jan. 19 in France. He was a member of the Mechanized Infantry. We certainly hope this good family will receive good news as to the outcome of this wound.

 

   

(V-177)                                                               (V-213) PFC Beauford L. Hanna                                

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 21, 1945 – “Posthumous Award of Bronze Star Medal: PFC B.L. HANNA, who died of wounds in France, was posthumously awarded the Bronze Medal for valorous action against the enemy.  The presentation was made by First Lt. MILLER to Darrell Patrick HANNA, 2 year old son of Mrs. B.L. HANNA.  The citation reads as follows: “For valorous conduct in action against the enemy.  On the night of 23 Nov. 1944, as his platoon was leading the advance of his battalion towards ________, France, Private First Class HANNA, first scout, observed an enemy emplacement about 10 yards off the road.  Rapidly circling the enemy position, Private First Class came upon it’s rear before the enemy within could fire more than one shot at the platoon.   By his alertness and aggressive performance of duty, Private First Class HANNA thus took three enemy prisoners and eliminating a hostile outpost.”

- T5 and Mrs. Joseph G. VALLOW of Battle Creek, Mich. came Sunday for a few days furlough with relatives.”

 

Apr. 29, 1948 - Funeral Services Held Sunday Afternoon in Gymnasium for PFC Beauford L. HANNA: Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon for the casketed remains at PFC Beauford L. HANNA in the gymnasium, Rev. C.L. HILL of Farina officiating.  This lad was wounded on Jan. 31, 1945 in France, and died in a hospital in France on Feb. 3 following.  A large crowd of friends attended this sad service.  and the profuse of flowers expressed the sympathy of the entire community.  The flag draped casket was escorted to its final resting place in Evergreen Cemetery by members of Kinmundy Post No. 519, American Legion, who gave their comrade a military burial.  PFC HANNA was the third Kinmundy war dead to reach home.  Beauford Laverne, youngest son of Dr. Homer L. and Martha Jane GRAY HANNA, was born in Kinmundy, July 18, 1920, acquiring his education in the local schools, graduated from Kinmundy H.S. with the class of ‘38.  After finishing school, B.L. worked for his father for a time, later going to Chicago where he was employed.  Here he met Miss Irene SLONINA and on Aug. 9, 1941, they were married in St. Louis.  He was called for duty with the U.S. Army on Nov. 17, 1942.  He was stationed at various camps in the U.S. and his companion and infant son, Darrell Patrick, were permitted to be near him.  These few months, though filled with hardships, are held as precious treasures by the grieving wife. After his arrival overseas, a daughter, Lavrene Lynn, was born at their Kinmundy home and was only two weeks old when her father was taken from her.  B.L. sailed overseas June 30, 1944, landing in Italy.  From there he went to France.  Here he distinguished himself as an outstanding hero.  The following citation describes this various action: “For valorous conduct in action against the enemy.  On the night of 23 Nov. 1944 as his platoon was leading the advance of his battalion, Private First Class B.L. HANNA, first scout, observed an enemy emplacement about 10 yards off the road.  Rapidly encircling the enemy position, Private First Class HANNA came upon its rear before the enemy within could fire more than one shot at the platoon.  By this alertness and aggressive performance of duty, Private First Class HANNA thus took three enemy prisoners and eliminated a hostile outpost.  For this heroic action he was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal and the Purple Heart.  The presentation, an impressive ceremony in the family home, occurred June 16, 1945, and was made by First Lt. MILLER to Daniel Patrick, the two year old son.  As a youth, B.L. attended Sunday School and Services at the Methodist Church in this city.   After going overseas these early teachings meant much to him.  Letters to his loved ones often spoke of his faith in God and the strength it gave him in his darkest hours.  B.L. was fatally injured on January 31, 1945, and died in a military hospital on Feb. 3, 1945.  He was temporarily interred in the United States Military Hospital in Epinal, France.  An infant son, Richard, preceded him to death May 1, 1942.  He is survived by his faithful companion, Irene, a son, Darrell Patrick, and a daughter, Lavrene Lynn.  He also leaves his beloved father, a stepmother, who was dear to his heart, and the following sisters and brothers: Bertha DAVIS and Leona RIECK of Chicago; Mary HANKS, Alma; Ruth KNABE, Kell; Gail HULTS, Ada SMITH, Clyde, Paul and Robert HANNA of this city; and Dwight HANNA of East Lansing, Mich.  Four step-sisters, Velma HANNA, Kinmundy; Florence JASPER, Eva RUPE and Lida BALDRIDGE, Centralia; a step-brother, Dean LONG of Rockford; other relatives and friends. 

 


 

Duane Jackson Hanna

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 19, 1945 – “Duane Jackson HANNA, 19, Seaman, 1 c, son of Mr. and Mrs. R.D. HANNA, R.R. 2, Kinmundy, has completed basic training at the Submarine School, Submarine Base, New London, Conn., for duty with our growing fleet of underseas fighters.  He will be entitled to wear the twin dolphin insignia of the Submarine Service after further experience aboard a submarine during which he must demonstrate to his commanding officer that he is fully qualified to carry out the duties of his rate.  HANNA joined the Navy last year in January, and graduated from Kinmundy H.S. in May.  Naval recruit training was given him at Great Lakes, Ill.  The Submarine School, the only one of it’s kind conducted by the Navy, is attended by a picked group of men.  The school work takes place not only in classrooms and laboratories, but also in training submarines in which the students master the actual techniques of operating the powerful fighting craft.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 17, 1946 –“Duane HANNA, S1c, arrived here Jan. 7 to spend a 30 day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ralston HANNA.  Duane entered the Navy in June 1944, and received his boot training at Great Lakes.  From there he was sent to New London, Conn., where he attended Submarine School.  After he finished his course, he was sent to San Diego, and assigned to the Submarine S31.  After a short while he was assigned to the Communications Office at Mare Island.  For the past 4 months, he has seen duty on the USS Pelias, a submarine tender.  After his leave has expired, he will report to San Diego.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 27, 1946 –“Duane HANNA, son of Mr. and Mrs. R.D. HANNA, entered service June 15, 1944, immediately after graduation from K.C.H.S. and received his boot training at Great Lakes.  He attended radio school at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.  After enlisting in submarine service, he was sent to New London, Conn., for advanced radio training and finished sound school in San Diego, Cal.  After 2 months in the Communication Office at Mare Island, Calif., he went aboard the U.S.S. Pelias where he remained the last 9 months previous to his discharge, May 31, 1946, at Shoemaker, Calif.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-212) Dr. H. Dwight Hanna

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Jan. 22, 1942 - "The Express was more than glad to receive a letter from Pvt. Dwight HANNA. Dwight reports that this camp in which he is stationed is a new camp and when completed will be the largest medical training center in the U.S. Army. He goes on to say that he doesn’t mind the Army life for it reminds him of his by gone school days, as he only has 1 hour of Military drill and the rest of the day is spent in the classroom."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 22, 1945 – “S. Sgt. and Mrs. Dwight HANNA and daughter, Jan, of El Paso, Texas, has been here for the past 10 days visiting with his parents, Dr. and Mrs. H.L. HANNA.  Sgt. HANNA will return to his camp Friday where he expects to receive his discharge about Dec. 1.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Leon Hanna

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois – Feb. 27, 1919

Viaden, Luxemburg – Jan. 21, 1919

Dearest Home Folks; 

I haven’t heard from you since I last wrote, but I know there must be a letter from you awaiting me at Steinfort.  I’ll try to drop you a few lines while I’m here to let you know that I am still O.K., am thinking of all of you and am trying to have a good time as usual.  I became so useless as a guard or sentinel in Steinfort they decided I needed a change of work and scenery, consequently, I am attending the Division Signal School here learning ALL about radio, line and visual signaling.  There are five of six men from each Co. in the Division attending various schools near here, viz: signal, automatic rifle, grenade (three men were severely wounded at grenade school today), bayonet and trench mortar.  I can’t appreciate the military value and significance of such schools, now that the war is over and we are all anticipating an immediate return to America and civil life.

I consider myself most fortunate in having been sent here, Vianden, being the oldest city in Luxbg., and possessing a number of historic and interesting features, is the mecca of every tourist or sight seer who visits this little country.  We reach this city by rail on a narrow gunge track that ascends the mountains by a very circuitous route.  Vianden was the refuge of Victor Hugo during his exile here in 1870, 71.  There is a monument here dedicated to his memory, also a café that bears his name.  I am now less than fifty yards away from the house wherein he dwelt during the year he lived here.  He has written a book entitled “De__ouis 1 Edil (after the Exile)” in which he tells about Vianden.  There is an older, ancient and ruined castle here that was built in the fourth century.  A chapel was added to it in the 17th century.  It is open to visitors but I haven’t had an opportunity to visit it yet.  There is a large book of register in the chapel that contains the names of those who have visited the place.  Yesterday it received the signatures of Gen. Joffre and Gen. Steinmetz who were sight seeing here.  I didn’t get to see them as I was in school during their brief visit.  It contains the name of King Henry I, Wm of Orange, Victor Hugo, Grand Duchesss and her family, Ex Kaiser Wilhelm and his sons other crowned (or once crowned heads) of Europe, artists and poets world renown.  There is an ancient church here that was carved from the rock.  The four only survivors of the “Black Death” in this town carved the church from the stone as a tribute to God for his deliverance thru that peril.  This may be mythical but the church is real and is an evidence of some one’s difficult and persistent efforts.

Vianden is situated between pine covered mountains on the banks of the beautiful little river Our, just a fifteen minute walk from the German border.  No one can cross the border without a pass, this applies to us as well as the civilians.  This town reminds me very much of La Romboute in the Anneigues, in fact this is almost like having another furlough.

When I passed through Division Headquarters in Diekirch yesterday whom should I meet but Byran ROBB.  He transferred to Co. A 108th M.P.’s in November and is now liable to remain over here longer than if he had remained in the Infantry.  The M.P.’s will probably be kept a little longer than the Inf., but we may all go back at the same time.  He is the first Kinmundy boy I have seen since September 8.  Well, I’m getting sleepy, so I’ll close and take my usual nightly nap.  Hoping this finds you all well, I am your loving son and brother,

          Leon Hanna

 

 

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois – May 15, 1919      

“Local boy Awarded D.S.C.” (A picture was included.)

“Leon HANNA is awarded D.S.C. for capture of Machine Gun Nest single Handed.” - “Letter brings first indication.”

 Gravevenmacher, Luxemburg – Apr. 19, 1919

 

Dear Parents, Brothers and Sisters,

           I have quite a bit of spare time today, so I will answer your letter of March 30th, which I received in Stienfort a few days ago.  Was very glad to note that you were all still blessed with good health and am hoping this finds your conditions unchanged.  This leaves me fine and dandy as usual.

           I fear our sailing date has been changed a little, but I know we will sail sometime in May.  I don’t think we will leave Luxbg. before the 25th of this month.  I suppose you would like to know why I am in Grevenmacher so I’ll just narrate a little in elucidation thereof.  The men of the 7th Bn. 131st who are to be decorated with a D.S.C at the next review, which will be held at Ettelbrich, Mon., have been assembled here with Co. A.  There are three of us from D. Co., three from C., four from B., and two from A Co.  We came here day before yesterday, Thursday.

           We were in luck because A. Co. held a big banquet that evening in honor of three of their officers who have been transferred to Divisions that will remain in the Army of Occupation for several months yet.  We were invited to attend so of course, we gladly accepted.  You might know we thoroughly enjoyed ourselves, judging by the enclosed menu for the occasion.  Ruby, if your junior banquet beat this one, it will sure be a good one.  I would like to get home by the time school is out but I suppose I’ll be rather late for commencement exercises.

           This is a very pretty town situated on the Moselle River, the natural boundary between Germany and Luxemberg.  This is my third trip here.  I think I have previously written about being here and going across the river into Germany, have I not?  At least I think I have so I’ll not bother with a repetition of the same.  We did not trouble our selves with carrying our blankets down here and getting billeted some place, so we’re stopping at a real nice hotel and acting like gentlemen of leisure.  It is a bit expensive but we fell repaid by the additional comforts and conveniences.

           We have nothing to do while we are here but report twice a day at Hdqrs. to let them know we are still here so they can find us in case we are needed.

           Well tomorrow is Easter and I suppose I will spend the day in Grevenmacher.  I have been invited out to dinner in a private home so I know I’ll have quite a good time.  There are two of us invited to the place Ragner Liluborg and myself.  Liluborg was 13 years old when he left Sweden but his 12 years in America, chiefly Chicago and Denver have thoroughly Americanized him.  He received the British Military Medal for good work on the Somme offensive at Chipply Ridge and now he will get the American D.S.C.

           Hoping this finds all well and that I will be with you soon.

                      I am,  Leon HANNA

 


 

(V-75) Mertie L. "Huffy" Hanna

 


 

R.D. Hanna

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois – Feb. 27, 1919            

January 31, 1919

    Dear Folks:  As I am doing nothing this afternoon will drop you a few lines to let you know I am well and everything is O.K. with me.  How are all of you folks at home.  It has been a little colder lately with a light skiff of snow a couple of times but it don’t stay on the ground long for the ground doesn’t freeze very solid and thaws out every day.  We have our tent warm and cozy now with two stoves going.  It has two thickness of canvas consequently it holds the heat almost equal to a house.  We have a part of it partitioned off for the wood supply.  As for getting cold in driving, there is no danger for we have been issued leather jackets and driving mitts.

           Dad, these ambulances are G.M.C.’s, put out by the General Motors Company of Pontiac, Mich.  They are pretty good motor (confidential motor) at least there has been no trouble with them so far.  When they came out of the factory, the governors on the carburetors were set so that the maximum speed was twenty miles and a padlock put on each one, but most of them are turned up so one can get about 30 or 35 miles per hour now.

           I got a card from Leon last Sunday, dated January 6, from Luxembourg saying he had written me a letter before that date, but I haven’t received it yet.  The only chance of our meeting over here is that I may be sent to Germany, but I do not think that will happen.  I hope we are not transferred in the army of occupation, but I would like to see Germany while I am over here.

           That is too bad about Walter but I hope he recovers soon.  I got a letter from Orville, also one from Hank this week.  Hank’s was dated Nov. 19 and was forwarded from Camp Crane and Camp Merritt, N.J.

           Mother, I did not get your Xmas package, at least not so far, but may get it yet as several of the boys haven’t received theirs.

           Well, after next week we will have the whole camp to ourselves for the other company is going to leave for LeMans sometime next week, as one company can handle the work here now.

           Yes Ruby, that postcard is a view of a portion of Montbazon, which is a small town about three miles from Camp Chambray, is about the same size, but is only half as far, so we usually go there in search of amusement, but we never go to the movies there.  Well folks, I can’t think of anything else that would be of interest to you so will close, hoping all is well with you.

      With Love,  Pvt. R.D. HANNA - Evac. Amb. Co. 67, A.P.O. 717

 


 

Ralston Xon Hanna

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 1, 1954 – “While serving aboard the heavy cruiser USS Rochester, Xon HANNA, radioman seaman, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ross HANNA, Kinmundy, participated in Operation Flag Hoist an amphibious training exercise on the island of Iwo Jima.  The operation involved thousands of Navy and Marine Corps personnel.  It afforded training and execution of an amphibious landing under realistic combat conditions.  The training exercise took place 9 years after the capture of the small Pacific island.  Japanese resistance ended March 16, 1945.” 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Apr. 21, 1955 – “Ralston Xon HANNA, radioman third class, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ross D. HANNA, of Kinmundy, is serving aboard the heavy cruiser USS Rochester, flagship of Vice Admiral M. Pride, USN, Commander of the U.S. 7th Fleet.  The ship has recently called at Yokosuka, Japan, Keelung Formosa, and Manila, P.I.” 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 4, 1956 – “Ralston X. HANNA, radioman second class, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralston HANNA of Kinmundy, is serving aboard the heavy cruiser, U.S.S. Rochester.  He entered the Navy in Feb. 1953, and completed his basic training in San Diego, Calif. 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 14, 1957 – “Xon HANNA, RM1, arrived home Thursday after receiving his discharge from the Navy, Jan. 30 at Long Beach, Calif.  He has spent much of the 4 years of duty at points in the far east.”

 


 

   

(V-215) Robert Gray Hanna                                                                                  (V-214) Robert Gray Hanna

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - May 4, 1944 - "Here’s a V-Mail letter from Cpl. Robert HANNA, who is on duty somewhere around New Guinea. He says: It has been my intention of writing you a letter and thanking you for the Kinmundy paper for quite some time but just neglected to do so. I have been in the army 3 years today and have received your paper regular all the time. I really enjoy it as it keeps me posted on the folks at home. I have met a couple of Kinmundy boys since I’ve been overseas. I met James HAMMER the first time I went to town. I wrote home for Elwin TROUT’s address and looked him up. We saw each other 1 time and then he was sent away from this part of the country. I had a nice visit with both boys and hope to be seeing them before so very long on the streets of Kinmundy. I could write you lots about the country over here, but as yet I have seen nothing worth writing home about. I wouldn’t trade one little part of Kinmundy for all the country this side of the ocean. I am still in a veterinary section, but am attached to a Medical Supply Dept at the present time. I hope to back doing veterinary work again before long, but don’t know if I will be or not. Well I am about to run out of writing space here so will sign off for this time. Thanking you again for the paper."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 22, 1945 – “Sgt. Robert HANNA arrived here Nov. 6th where he is again at home with his wife and 2 year old son, Bill, and his parents, Dr. and Mrs. H.L. HANNA, after receiving his discharge at Camp Grant on Nov. 1st.  Sgt. HANNA entered the service April 9, 1941, and shipped overseas Aug. 25, 1943, landing in Australia.  From there he went to Dutch, New Guinea and then to the Philippines.  He started home Oct. 2, and landed in San Francisco, Oct. 23.  Sgt. HANNA wears the Good Conduct Medal, the American Defense Ribbon, the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with 2 stars, representing the campaigns of New Guinea and the Philippines, and the Philippine Liberation Ribbon and the Victory Ribbon.  Bob says he is just so glad to get home again that he doesn’t think he will ever leave again.”

 


 

Robert G. Hanna

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 8, 1951 – “- Pfc. Robert G. HANNA graduated this week from the Air Force Communications school at Scott Air Force Base in a specialized course in radio mechanics.  Pfc HANNA, 18, son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul G. HANNA, Kinmundy, attended high school here, and has been on active duty with the Air Force since March 19, 1950.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 3, 1952 – “Sgt. Robert G. HANNA visited a few days in Kinmundy with relatives and friends before being sent overseas. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul HANNA of Kell.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 20, 1952 – “Sgt. Robert G. HANNA, son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul G. HANNA of Kell, Ill., arrived at the Furstonfeldruck, Germany with the 117th Tactical Reconnaissance Group. He was sent there due to General Eisenhower’s vastly increasing NATO Forces, and a vital member of the European Defense Team. Sgt. HANNA entered the service in March 1950, and he attended Kinmundy H.S.”

 


 

Eldred Hanson

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 19, 1945 – “Here’s a short note from Cpl. Edred HANSON, who is now taking in the sights of Honolulu.  He says: Received some of your papers today and I wish to take this opportunity to thank you and all my friends in Kinmundy for the paper.  I am stationed in the Hawaiian Islands and the weather here is grand.  Went for a trip around the Islands and the scenery is beautiful, especially the pineapple fields.  There are plenty of cocoanuts, bananas, and sugar cane also.  Been to Pearl Harbor, Honolulu, and Waikiki Beach also.  I am putting on a slight sun tan.  Thanks for everything and I hope to be seeing Kinmundy soon.  Best wishes to all.”


 

John Hanson

"The Kinmundy Express" - Apr. 13, 1944 - "Here’s a V-Mail from M. Sgt. John HANSON, who is now sojourning in New Guinea. He says: Just a few lines to let you know my APO number has been changed and how much I appreciate getting the Express. I enjoy your Zatso column very much, although I don’t agree with all you say, I find it very interesting. I am at present in New Guinea and this jungle is plenty rugged. If it wasn’t for military reasons, I’d say let the Japs have it. That would be a fitting punishment for them. But we are not having it too hard. The eats are very good and while we work hard, we sure don’t mind that, as beating the Japs is the main idea. As I advance I can see just what the morale of the soldier is and they have just one idea - to get this thing over with and get back home. We don’t get much news from the States and some of the things we hear don’t sound good. I believe that the ones at home complain and do not help the war effort are very much in the minority and those kind will always be around. How are things around Kinmundy? It has been years since I have been there for a long visit but I think about it often. I can’t say that I like Kinmundy better than any place I’ve seen, but it ranks right at the top. I wish to take this opportunity to thank the Chamber of Commerce for the carton of cigarettes. They sure came in handy. Well, guess I’ll close for now. Thanking you again for the paper."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 18, 1945 – “Master Sergeant John G. HANSON of Kinmundy, husband of Mrs. Alma HANSON, of Barlesville, Okla., re-enlisted in the army recently to continue his career as a professional soldier.  He took the oath at Jefferson Barracks.  A veteran with 16 years of military experience.  Sergeant HANSON was overseas 2 years and 2 months in World War, II serving in Australia, New Guinea and the Philippines.  He was awarded 6 battle stars.”

 


 

Ed Harrell - “The Kinmundy Express” – June 28, 1956 – “Honored at Salem Reunion: The Annual Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Reunion being held in Salem this week, was named for Ed HARRELL this year.  It is the custom of this organization to name the reunion each year in honor of some deceased soldier or sailor.  Mr. HARRELL was chosen this time, he being a veteran of the Spanish-American War.  The widow, Mrs. Mary HARRELL, was honored Monday evening by being on the stage.”

 


 

(V-115) John B. Harrell

 


 

Jimmie L. Hays

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 26, 1969 – “Fireman Jimmie L. HAYS, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Hays, of Alma, returned to San Diego aboard the destroyer USS Hopewell after a seven month deployment to the Western Pacific.  While on deployment his assignments ranged from Market Time patrols, which helped stop the infiltration by the enemy of arms and men into South Vietnam to Naval gunfire support and rescue destroyer plane guard duty in the Gulf of Tonkin”

 


 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Feb. 11, 1943 - HEADLEY family

"Five sons and one son-in-law in the armed forces and four sons in defense work - such is the contribution of Mr. and Mrs. Winfred HEADLEY, Kinmundy, to their nation in time of war. Mr. HEADLEY, who is 71 years old, owns and manages a 330 acre farm 7 miles northwest of Kinmundy in Foster twp., doing much of the work himself. Another son, Merle, 28, assists him at the farm. Mr. and Mrs. HEADLEY have 13 children, 11 of whom are sons. One son, Pvt. Harvey, 33, who is now stationed in Colorado, has served 4 years with the army in the U.S. and Alaska. Other sons in the service: Pfc. Leslie HEADLEY, 44; Pvt. Russell HEADLEY, 43; Pvt. Harry HEADLEY, 35; Pvt. Wesley HEADLEY, 29; Pvt. Herschel SIMMONS, son-in-law. One daughter, Mrs. Herschel SIMMONS, has taught in the rural schools of Marion County for 16 years. A second daughter is Gilbert DOOLEN of Kinmundy. Mr. HEADLEY was born near Kinmundy on Nov. 10, 1872, and has served all his life as a farmer. On Nov. 10, 1898, at Vandalia, he was married to Miss Mary Lillian DOOLEN. After selective service took his sons from their large farm, HEADLEY went ahead with the work, raising many cattle and hogs, and harvesting more than 800 bushels of hybrid corn in addition to other customary farm crops, such as wheat, soybeans, clover and redtop hay."

 


 

Bill J. Headley

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 3, 1964 –“Airman Billey J. HEADLEY, son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth E. Peddicord of Alma, has completed the first phase of his Air Force basic military training at Lackland AFB, Texas.  He is a 1963 graduate of Patoka H.S.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 26, 1964 –“Airman Third Class Bill J. HEADLEY, son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Peddicord of Alma, has graduated from the training course for U.S. Air Force specialists at an AFB in Texas.  He is a graduate of Patoka H.S., and enlisted in June.”

 


 

(V-202) Merle B. Headley


 

(V-392a) Pvt. Wes Headley (supposed to be on guard duty in West Virginia)

 


 

John Heicher - “The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 30, 1971 –“John HEICHER, son of Mr. and Mrs. Merle HEICHER, of Kinmundy, has been promoted to Pfc. E-3.  John is a meat cutter in the Commissary at Ft. Carson, Colo.  John and his wife, Connie, live in Colorado Springs, Colo."

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 25, 1945 – “Sgt. John Howard HELM arrived here Sunday morning wearing 5 gold bars on the left sleeve of his blouse, each bar representing 6 months service overseas.  Sgt. HELM has spent these 30 months in the Southwest Pacific with the Field-Artillery.  He can tell you lots about Hawaii, Gaudacanal, New Britain, New Guinea, as well as several of the small islands in the Theater of War.  He is now making the best of his 21 days delay enroute.  As he stepped from the train Sunday morning, he was greeted by his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Marion HELM, as well as several friends, who needless to say, are very happy over his arrival home.  And of course Howard is happy about the whole affair also.  He looks a little fatigued, and carries a nice coat of tan.  He says the weather here is much different to what he has been accustomed to.  Sgt. HELM is enroute to Miami Beach, Fla., where he will be reassigned.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 5, 1945 – “Sgt. John Howard HELM arrived home Friday morning after receiving his discharge papers at Fort Sheridan the day previous.  In all, he had 85 points.  Sgt. HELM spent 30 months in the Southwest Pacific with the Field Artillery.  He was permitted to come home last January on a 21 day furlough.  After spending his furlough here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Marion HELM, and his bride, the former Miss Verma Del MERCER, of Salem, he was sent to Fort Ord, Calif., where he remained until discharged.  Sgt. HELM wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Pre-Pearl Harbor Ribbon, and the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with 1 star, representing the Bismark Archipelago Campaign.  He says he doesn’t know just exactly what he is going to do now, but first of all he is going to get caught up on his sleeping.” 

 

 

 

(V-260b) Howard Helm

 


 

(V-171) Cary Henken

 


 

Paul F. Henken

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 30, 1964 –“Paul F. HENKEN, seaman, USN, son of Mrs. Pauline Gaston of Alma, has departed for duty in the Western Pacific aboard the destroyer tender USS Piedmont.  As a unit of the U.S. Seventh Fleet in the Western Pacific, Piedmont will operate as a floating repair facility for destroyers and destroyer escorts.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 21, 1965 –“Seaman Paul F. HENKEN, USN, son of Mrs. Pauline Gaston of Alma, returned to San Diego, Calif., Dec. 11, aboard the destroyer tender USS Piedmont, after completing a tour of duty with the Seventh Fleet in the Far East.  While with the Seventh Fleet, the Piedmont provided repairs and maintenance for the destroyers of the fleet.  In addition, the crewmembers participated in the People-to-People program by providing medical supplies, clothing and food for the needy people of Hong Kong and other areas of the Far East.”

 


 

(V-104) Leonald S. Henson

 


 

(V-143) William Ray Henson

 


 

Roger H. Herron - “The Kinmundy Express” – July 30, 1953 – “A/1c and Mrs. Roger H. HERRON have a daughter born July 27 at Maxwell Air Force Base, Montgomery, Ala. named Renee Ellen. Mrs. HERRON is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Orous LEACH of Kinmundy and DeKalb, and Mr. HERRON is son of Mr. and Mrs. Harley HERRON of Lockport, Ill.”

 


 

(V-287) Henry Williams and Delbert Hicks

 


Walter Hiestand

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 4, 1945 – “Pleasant Grove: Mr. and Mrs. Claude HIESTAND received a telephone call Saturday from their son, Cpl. Walter HIESTAND in New Jersey stating he would soon be in Chicago for a few days before returning home.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  William Harley Hill

 

     (V-261b)  William H. Hill                                  (V-337)  William H. Hill funeral

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Oct. 26, 1944 - "Pvt. William H. HILL, son of Mr. and Mrs. W.H. HILL, Killed in Action in Luxembourg: Again our little community has been dealt a blow by the horrors of war. This time we are extending heartfelt sympathy to Mr. and Mrs. W. Harley HILL who are grieving the loss of their only son. They received the message from the War Dept. yesterday morning stating their son, Pvt. William H. HILL had been killed in action in Luxembourg on Oct. 7th. This was, indeed, a hard blow to this couple because just a week ago they had received a long letter from their son, dated Oct. 3rd, in which he had stated that he was in Luxembourg and everything was going along alright. And we suppose it was but what a difference a few days can make. Pvt. William H., son of W. Harley and Ethel MERCER HILL, was born on the farm occupied for many years by this good family, south and east of Kinmundy, May 19, 1923. He attended the local schools here, being in this district. When he was in his sophomore year in high school, he enlisted in the army and was inducted on Jan. 17, 1942. He received his training in various camps and shipped overseas July 15, 1944, landing in England. His company did not stay very long in England but crossed the channel into France. He was a member of C. A, 774th Tank Battalion, being a gunner and a radio man. Bill, as we knew him, was a regular attendant at Chapel Services as was evidenced by the numerous letters received from his Chaplain. They also received several letters from his commanding officers telling them what a splendid soldier he was. Besides the bereaved parents, he leaves 3 sisters, Miss Myrtle, who is a teacher in the Lawrenceville, Ill. schools; Louise HATFIELD of Winterhaven, Fla.; and Rhea WILLIAMS of Chicago. The flag over our service board now floats at half-mast in honor of the memory of another lad who has given his last full measure of devotion for his country. And the name of Private Bill has been added to our list to be remembered when we face the east on Nov. 11th.

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Dec. 16, 1948 - Funeral Rites Held Sunday Afternoon for Pvt. William H. HILL: “Greater love hath no man than He who lays down his life for his friends.”  By losing his life in action in Luxembourg on Oct. 7, 1944, Pvt. William Harley HILL proved that his heart contained this greater love.  Bill, as everyone knew him, was born on a farm near Kinmundy, the son of William H. and Ethel MERCER HILL.  He attended the Kinmundy school, and when a sophomore, he enlisted in the U.S. Army, and was inducted Jan. 17, 1942.  After training in various camps as a gunner and radio man, he was sent to Europe, arriving there July 29, 1944.  He was with Co. A. 774th Tank Battalion.  His family received numerous letters from his Chaplain stating that he was a regular attendant at Chapel Service.  His commanding officer wrote letters telling what a splendid soldier he was.  This has been a source of comfort to his sorrowing family.  Bill’s friends will long remember the sacrifice he made, along with his constant cheerfulness and his ever-ready smile.   His survivors are his parents of Kinmundy; and three sisters, Myrtle, Lawrenceville; Mrs. Louise HATFIELD, Winterhaven, Fla.; Mrs. Rhea WILLIAMS of Park Ridge, Ill.; 5 nephews, 1 niece, and a number of cousins and a host of friends.  Funeral services were held from the Methodist Church Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. Orlando BRAKEMEYER officiating.  Interment was made in Evergreen Cemetery, under the auspices of Kinmundy Post 519, American Legion.  (Two pictures were included - one of Bill in uniform, and the other of his casket being carried by fellow soldiers.)

 


 

Elizabeth L. Hines - “The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 10, 1963 – “Elizabeth L. HINES of Alma, a member of the Women in the Air Force (WAF), has been promoted to captain.  She is the daughter of Mrs. Mary E. Hines of Alma.  Captain Hines, who entered the service in Jan. 1957, is serving at MARCH AFB, Calif., as an administrative officer.  The captain is a graduate of Salem H.S. with a B.S. degree from the U. of I.”

 


 

Gail Hines - "The Kinmundy Express" - March 23, 1944 - "Here’s one from 1st Lt. Chaplain Gail HINES. He says: I am writing this to notify you of a change of address. I am in the United Kingdom now, and am keeping busy trying to learn the ways of this place. The people are most kind and helpful, and the country where I am located is most lovely. I am very pleased with my work here and am being given excellent cooperation and help. I trust this finds you all well. My regards to all my good friends there."

 


 

John W. Hines - “The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 23, 1971 – “Major John W. HINES, a test pilot in the U.S. Air Force stationed at Point Mugu, Calif., flew into Scott AFB last Saturday night landing about 8:30, where he was met by his parents, Rev. and Mrs. Gail W. Hines.  They brought him to their home in Kinmundy to spend the night and attend church with them Sunday morning.  Soon after church, they returned him to Scott where he flew back to Point Mugu.  John reports this was a flight to test certain navigational equipment on the TA4 which he was flying.  When asked what his flying speed was, he said about 650 miles per hour, and the elevation was a little over 31, 000 feet.  John reports he found some of the equipment inoperable, and will have to be changed.”

 


 

Marion Hines

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 18, 1945 – “Meadow Branch (from last week): Word has been received that Marion HINES, son of Mr. and Mrs. Otis HINES, has been sent overseas.  He was sent from Ft. Riley, Kansas to Ft. Ord, Cal., in Sept. where he embarked.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 31, 1951 – “Master Sergeant Marion HINES, member of Company K., 38th Infantry, 2nd Div. of the U.S. Army was awarded the Silver Star for Gallantry in Action.  On Nov. 9, 1950 in the vicinity of Yongwon, Korea, numerically superior enemy forces attacked the hill positions defended by Sergeant HINES’ platoon.  The enemy attacked the right flank which was defended by Sergeant HINES with his platoon and 12 men.  In the ensuing firefight, all but Sergeant HINES and two men remained unwounded.  While the two soldiers aided the wounded to the company command post, Sergeant HINES remained in position surrounded by the enemy, and relayed information to his commander as to the hostile movements.  At the same time, he delivered a continuous and heavy stream of fire upon the enemy, keeping them at bay until a counterattack was organized which drove the enemy from the hill and regained the lost position.   (Sergeant HINES is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Otis HINES of Chicago, formerly of this city.)”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 27, 1958 – “Mr. and Mrs. Marion HINES, who has been stationed at Camp Polk, La., and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Otis HINES of Chicago, spent the weekend with Mr. and Mrs. Ellis BUTTS.  Marion and his wife plan to leave April 15 for Germany to make their home, where he will be stationed for 3 years.”

 


 

Olive J. Hines

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 17, 1966 – “Major Olive J. HINES, son of Mrs. Mary E. Hines of Alma, is now on duty with U.S. combat air forces in southeast Asia.  Major Hines, an F-4C Phantom II aircraft pilot, flies from a forward combat base.  The major, a graduate of Salem High School, attended the Univ. of Ill..  He received his commission and B.S. degree upon graduation from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1954.  He received an M.S. degree at Purdue Univ. in 1962.  Major Hines is married to the former Annemarie Hammerstingt.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 13, 1968 – “Major Olive J. HINES, son of Mrs. Mary E. Hines of Alma, has been recognized for helping his unitearn the U.S. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award.  Major Hines, a USAF representative in a detachment of the 3825th Support Group at the U.S. Army Infantry School, Ft. Benning, Ga., will wear the distinctive service ribbon as a permanent decoration.”

 


 

Otis Hines

"The Kinmundy Express”  - Dec. 19, 1918 & Dec. 26, 1918

 Dear Folks,

I landed in France all right.  I was sick about half the time.  The sea was smooth, so the sailors said, but it seemed rough to me.  I enjoyed the trip fine while I was feeling well.  Everything looks so odd here.  The people dress so differently and wear wooden shoes.  All the French wagons are one horse wagons or carts.  They all have shafts.  The railroad cars have wheels with spokes like mowing machine wheels and the engines are smaller than any I ever saw in America.  I have already seen some German prisoners.  I was not very close to them but they seemed to be well dressed and to get as good care as our own soldiers.  All the houses are made of stone in France and all the land is cleared up and put in cultivation.  We are not with our company yet but I think we will get with them yet.  Don’t expect a letter from me more than once a week for I don’t expect I can write any oftener.  I will be glad when I get up with my company so I can get some mail as I feel sure I have some.  We have been touring Frances in a box car.  We rode in a French car the first trip and in a U.S. car and it liked to have jolted the life out of us.  The French cars ride easier than the American cars.  The track is just a new one and is rough.  Our captain was taken away from us and we are all alone now.  The Captain said, he thought we would get back together again.  We got news from the front better than I thought.  We get a paper from Paris, “The New York Herald”.  They look pretty good, the latest they have all quit, but Germany and if they get these men that are in camp into active service, her time will surely be short if I could find a kodak I could take some fine pictures of these odd buildings.  I just stepped outside and run across a boy from Kinmundy.  I did not know him but BAILEY is his name.  They just came in this evening and while they were lined up for mess I called for Ill. boys.  There was lots of them but he is the only one I knew anything about.  I ate my first blackberries and picked them of the bush since I have been here.  The garden stuff here is just at its best now from the looks of things.  They have all kinds of German prisoners in this country and they all seem contented.

     Nov. 15: Will write some more.  I am well and feeling fine.  I am with my company now but I have not received any mail, none of the boys have had any mail since they left the U.S.  We are close to the front.  Some of our boys were on the line when they stopped fighting.  My bunch had just started for the front when the firing stopped.  SPITLER is on the front.  TOTTS did not come over as I did but he is in Frances now.  He said, “They had a little accident close to the coast of England.  They ran into an English Uboat chaser and smashed it up.”  TOTTS is looking well and has one of the finest mustaches you ever saw.  If we had some furniture on it would seem a little liek home here.  The building we are in is over 1200 years old and is a pretty good old place yet.  The boys said Old Fritz came over twice in a aeroplane since they have been here but was soon driven back before he did any damage.  This town was in the hands of the Germans at one time not very long ago and is shot up in places pretty bad.  They said The ____ was something awful back here at night and they whole sky was lit up.  I would liked to have been here when the armistice was signed for I guess the firing was something great the night before they quit.

    Nov. 16: I got two letters yesterday, and one today, one from Eff___ was written the 17th of Oct. And the one from home was written the 15th.  The one I got today was wirtten the 8th.   It is hard to get writing material here only as we buy it.  I am awful glad the war is over but I would like to have been there when it stopped, but I guess I am just as well off and may be better off.  Some more fellows and myself are going to the trenches in the morning if it is a pretty day and see if we can’t get something for a souvenier.  I would like to get a German helmet or something.  I don’t expect we will go up to the front line trenches for that would be to far.  Some of the boys brought in a cow and a goat they had captured.  They found them in a cave where Germans had left them when they retreated.  It is a nice Holstein cow and a big fat goat.  There are some of the boys going into Germany a few days and we may go too.  I rather think that will be a nice trip.  I have been down under this building today, in some of the caves that were made a long time ago.  We went into nearly every place we could find; we saw where they put their prisoners in a real dark place, and the place where they hung the bodies of people and burned them when they do.  This is what an old Frenchman told us that could speak English.  We found an underground passage and we are about as far as two city blocks part of the time on our hands and knees and part of the time we could walk.  We finally decided to give it up.  I might have come out on the other side of town or in the Mense River.

    Nov. 17: I did not get to take my visit today to the trenches.  I was busy this morning and this evening I had to read my mail I only got 17 letters and eleven from home - two from Eli, two from Kansas, one from Rhea, and one from Baltimore.  Some of the boys got a big pile of mail as many as thirty letters and some only got about six.  One of the boys here said he wished they wouldn’t censor the letters, He did not want to write any war letters, he wanted to write some love.  I don’t know as I care to write any love of that kind but I would like to tell where I am and where I have been.  Two of the boys in my company got bad news in their mail one that his wife was dead and another that his father was dead.  I sure want you folks to all keep well and I will do my best to.  There are lots of the boys showing up, now that has taken French leave here in Frances.  They think maybe their company will go home right away.  They are being put in the Guard house.  I don’t know how they will make out.  I will close out this time.  

         Pvt. Otis HINES  - Co. F. Water Tank Train; Am. E.F. Via N.Y.

 


 

Anson A. Hinkley - “The Kinmundy Express” – May 3, 1945 – “Technical Sergeant Anson A. HINKLEY is spending a 21 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. H.O. HINKLEY, in Alma.  Sergeant HINKLEY is a Weather Forecaster with the Army Air Forces and for the past year has been stationed at Paramaribo, Dutch Guiana, to which place he will return at the conclusion of his furlough.”

 


 

 

(V-33) John D. Purcell, Dale Broom, and Henry O. Hinkley, Jr.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Henry Hinkley

 

(V-179) Henry O. Hinkley, Jr.

 

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - July 6, 1944 

"PFC Henry O. HINKLEY Killed in Action June 7th in Southwest Pacific Theater: A telegram was received Tuesday evening by Mr. and Mrs. H.O. HINKLEY, of Alma, stating that their son, PFC Henry O. HINKLEY, Jr., had been killed in action on Biak Island on June 7th. Needless to say this cast a shadow of gloom over the entire community. This was Alma’s first casualty. PFC Henry O. HINKLEY, the youngest son of Henry O. and Abbie KELSEY HINKLEY, was born March 4, 1924, in Elvsburg, Penn., and died at the age of 20 years, 3 months, and 3 days. Most of his life was spent in and around Alma. He attended the High School in Salem, graduating with the class of ‘41 and where he had attained a great athletic record. He spent 2 years in Carbondale where he attended Southern Illinois Normal University. He was inducted into the Army on March 5, 1943, and assigned to the Infantry. He left the states July 1943, landing in Australia on July _. He was moved to New Guinea in March 1944 and has seen a good deal of combat service. After entering the service, he was never granted a furlough in order to visit homefolks. Besides his parents, he leaves 2 brothers, S. Sgt. Anson A., now with the Weather Section of the Army Air Forces and stationed in Dutch Guinea, and Harlan K. of Carbondale, Ill. The only sister, Audrey I. HARRIS, was killed in an auto accident near Alma in 1937. We are told that a memorial service will be held for this lad in Alma but the date for this service has not be set as yet. Our hearts are truly saddened and our heartfelt sympathy goes out for this good family."

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Aug. 3, 1944 

"Memorial Services were held Sunday in the Alma Methodist Church for Pvt. Henry O. HINKLEY, who was killed in action on Biak Island, June 7. The service included: Song - LECKRONE Sisters; Prayer - Rev. HARD; Song - Alma Trio; Message - Dr. Roy N. KEEN; Remarks - Rev. Roy E. McGRATH; Taps. Henry Otis HINKLEY was born at Elysburg, Pa., March 4, 1924. He came to Greenville, Ill. with his parents in 1930 and to Alma, Ill. in 1934. He attended the grade schools in both Greenville and Alma and was graduated from Salem H.S. with high honors with the class of ‘41. He then attended the S.I.N.U. at Carbondale until called for duty with the U.S. Armed Forces on March 5, 1943. He gave his life for his country on June 7, 1944, immediately after a beachhead had been established on Biak Island, New Guinea. He was given military burial there and memorial services were held for him in Alma on July 30, 1944. (A list of those attending from a distance was included)."

 


 

Benton A. Hoard

 “The Kinmundy Express” – May 9, 1968 – “Army Private Benton A. HOARD, 22, whose parents, Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow Hoard, live in Alma, completed 9 weeks of advanced military training Apr. 26 at Ft. Polk, La.  His wife, Peggy, lives in Salem.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 3, 1969 – “Receives Purple Heart: Army Specialist 4  Benton A. HOARD, 23, son of Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow W. Hoard of Alma, receives the Purple Heart during ceremonies March 5 near Tay Ninh, Vietnam.  Congratulating him is Major Thomas Robinson, his battalion executive officer.  Spec. Hoard was presented the award for wounds suffered in action against hostile forcer in Vietnam.  The specialist, a truck driver with Company A, 4th Battalion, 23rd Infantry of the 25th Infantry Division near Tay Ninh, entered the Army in Nov. 1967 and was stationed at Ft. Polk, La., before arriving overseas in May 1968.  He holds the Combat infantryman badge.  His wife, Peggy, lives on Rt. 1, Salem.”  (A picture was included with this article.)

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 8, 1968 – “Benton HOARD, son of Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow Hoard of rural Kinmundy, received leg injuries from fragments of a rocket on July 18th.  He is under a doctors care, but has now been released from the hospital.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-204) H.C. "Bud" Howell

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 18, 1965 –“Mr. Bud HOWELL received his discharge from the U.S. Air Force Feb. 8th after 4 years service.  He arrived in Kinmundy Feb. 10th and visited until Sunday with his mother, Mrs. Lois Patterson.  He is now in Chicago visiting relatives.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Harold C. Howell - “The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 14, 1961 - “Airman Third Class Harold C. HOWELL, son of Mrs. Lois G. Howell Patterson, Salem, has graduated from the Aircraft Engine Mechanic School at Sheppard AF Base, Texas.   Airman Howell is now assigned to regular base duty.  The Airman attended  Kinmundy-Alma High School, and was employed by Town and Country Landscaping in Glen Ellyn, Ill. prior to entering service.”

 


(V-423) Charles "Chub" Hoyt  - WWI

 

 

 


 

George Hoyt - “The Kinmundy Express” – May 20, 1954 – “Pvt. George HOYT of Ft. Bliss, Texas is spending a 13 day furlough with relatives and friends in Salem and Kinmundy before reporting to Ft. Tiden, New York.” 

 


 

Jack Hoyt

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 19, 1953 – “Leaves for Korea: S. Sgt. Jack HOYT was guest of honor at a farewell party given by his aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph HOYT, on Nov. 15. Jack left Monday to report for Korean duty. Those attending the dinner were Mr. and Mrs. Carl JADWIN of Iuka, Mr. and Mrs. Guy WHITE and family of Salem, Mr. and Mrs. Marion EVANS, and Mr. and Mrs. Guy MOORE of Odin, Miss Joann HANKS, Miss Connie HOYT and Mr. Jesse HOYT of Kinmundy.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 1, 1955 – “S. Sgt. Jack HOYT arrived Wednesday for a 30 leave with his mother, Mrs. Hazel HOYT.  He just completed 22 months in Japan and Formosa.” 

 


 

John Hoyt

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 25, 1951 – “Pvt. John HOYT, who is stationed somewhere in Korea, subscribed for The Kinmundy Express for two of his friends, Lt. LOUTHITT and Sgt. WALLACE, as they are very much interested in the town of Kinmundy and like to read the paper.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 8, 1951 – “- Private John F. HOYT Getting Around Very Well With his Mail Cargo in Korea: The song “Don’t Get Around Much Anymore” doesn’t mean much to Pvt. John F. HOYT, Kinmundy, now serving with the armed forces in Korea, and one of the first Kinmundy men to enter the combat zone since the present fighting started.  Private HOYT, while serving as mail clerk for the 545th, Quartermaster Service Co., has seen quite a lot of Korea lately, both north and south of the 38th parallel.  In one instance, at Pyongyang, the North Korean capital, he left only a few hours before the first Chinese troops entered the city.  His comment on that occasion was typical.  “Darn it”, he said, “if they’d only let us stick around a little longer, I’d have been able to hire myself a Chinese General for a houseboy.”  At the present, his company is split up in many areas but all the mail is received at company headquarters.  To keep the mail flowing to the outlying troops, Private HOYT makes nightly mail delivery trips in his jeep, sometimes traveling as far as 50 miles in freezing weather and over rough terrain with his “morale raising” cargo.  His closest friend is a Korean soldier who serves as interpreter for the Korean laborers around the company.  Taking charge of the Korean labor, incidentally, is another of HOYT’s responsibilities.  Both men are 19 years old, but Nam is only 18 by American standards.  When a Korean baby is born, he is already a year old.  Each New Year’s Day he advances his age by one year, regardless of the date of his birth.  Private HOYT is a graduate of Kinmundy H.S. and entered the army in Nov. 1949.  He was stationed at Guam before he arrived in Korea last August.”

  

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 31, 1952 – “PFC John HOYT, son of Mrs. Cora HOYT, arrived home Tuesday on a 30 day furlough after spending the past 16½ months in Korea. At the end of his furlough, he will report back to Fort Sheridan, Ill.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 21, 1952 – “PFC John HOYT, who is a patient in the U.S. Naval Hospital in Great Lakes, Ill. would appreciate cards.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 18, 1952 – “Pfc John HOYT and Sc. Seaman Jack BROWN of Great Lakes Hospital visited the former’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank HOYT over the weekend. Pfc HOYT is to be stationed at Camp Atterbury, Ind.”

 


(V-452) Ralph G. Hoyt  (3rd row from bottom - far right)

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 10, 1946 –“With the 1st Calvary Division in Tokyo - Private Ralph G. HOYT, Kinmundy, Ill. of the 8th Army’s 1st Cavalry Division now in Tokyo, is among the latest group of men selected to return to the United States for demobilization.  Overseas 19 months, Private HOYT served in “F” Troop, 5th Calvary Regiment as rifleman.  A veteran of 4 campaigns, he wears the Asiatic-Pacific Theater-Ribbon with campaign stars for New Guinea, the Admiralty Islands, Leyte, and Luzon, the Combat Infantryman’s Badge and the Philippine Liberation Ribbon with 2 stars.  Employed by the Warren Pet. Co. in civilian life, Private HOYT entered the army in Aug. 1943.  His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jess HOYT, live in Kinmundy.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 7, 1946 –“Sgt. Ralph HOYT, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jess HOYT, arrived home Jan. 13, after receiving his discharge at Jefferson Barracks that same day.  Ralph entered the service Aug. 6, 1943 and shipped overseas Feb. 9, 1944, landing in Australia.  From there he went to New Guinea, then to Admiralty Islands, Leyte, Luzon, and Japan.  He left Japan Dec. 13, landing at Tacoma, Wash., Dec. 26.  He was forced to remain there about 10 days on account of the transportation congestion.  He was attached to the 1st Calvary Division.  Sgt. HOYT wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon, the Philippine Liberation Ribbon with 2 stars and the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with 4 stars representing the campaigns of New Guinea, Admiralty, Leyte, and Luzon.  As to his future, Ralph says at the present time, he is just going to rest.”

 

(V-424)


 

Robert Hoyt

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 20, 1949 – “Mrs. Hazel HOYT has received word from the American Red Cross and her son, Cpl. Robert HOYT that he was flown to the States from Japan on Jan. 4.  Our readers will remember that Cpl. HOYT was injured in a jeep accident and he is now hospitalized.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 10, 1949 – “Robert HOYT, who has been overseas for the past several years, and who was injured in a jeep accident in Japan spent the past week here with his mother, Mrs. Hazel HOYT.  Sgt. HOYT, who more recently has been a patient at Percy Jones Hospital, Battle Creek, Mich. will soon be transferred to Fort Valley Forge, Penn.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 18, 1952 – “Cpl. Robert HOYT left Tuesday for Camp Carson, Colo. where he is stationed with the U.S. Army.”


 

William Hoyt    

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 22, 1951 – “Cpl. William E. HOYT, son of Mrs. Hazel L. HOYT, of Kinmundy, is attending an aviation specialist course in the Technical Training Center, Chanute Air Force Base.  He will attend for approximately 8 weeks, and after completion will be reassigned to a permanent Air Force Base.  Cpl. HOYT has been in the military service 30 months.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 22, 1955 – “T. Sgt. William E. HOYT of O’Hare International Airport, Park Ridge, Ill., and Sgt. Robert J. HOYT of Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo., came Saturday to visit their mother, Mrs. Hazel HOYT.  The latter is on furlough after serving overseas.” 


 

(V-355) Thomas K. Hubbard

 “The Kinmundy Express” – July 5, 1973 –

"73d Aeromedical Airlift Squadron Commander, Lt. Col I.D. Richardson, on left, presents a Certificate of Recognition to Air Force Reserve Master Sergeant Thomas K. HUBBARD, on right, for his outstanding professional participation in the airlifting of Dept. of Defense patients within the United States, including flights transporting former prisoners-of-war during the recent "Operation Homecoming";

"Lt. Col. Irving D. Richardson 73d Aeromedical Airlift Squadron Commander, presented an Air Force Reserve Certificate of Recognition to Mr. Thomas K. HUBBARD for his meritorious service and outstanding contribution to the Squadron.  Recognized for his leadership, motivation, and professional knowledge, Mr. HUBBARD received the highest Air Force Reserve award for doing a superior job in the organization and administration of squadron medical activities.  During the last year, Mr. HUBBARD personally developed and supervised an intensive on-the-job training program with such remarkable efficiency that the unit received the highest operational readiness award, a C-1 rating and the top medical reserve unit award.  Mr. HUBBARD also contributed to the unit's "flying hospital" program during aeromedical evacuation flights.  His patient bedside manner, calmness, and mature judgment resulted in the highest quality of patient care and superb inflight management of medical technicians.  Mr. HUBBARD was also honored for his outstanding professional participation in the Military Airlift Command's "Operation Homecoming" which managed the return airlift of American POW's within the United States.  During a 15 month period, Mr. HUBBARD was one of only two medical service technicians to attain C-9A aircraft qualifications as a flight examiner.  He received a Certificate of Achievement for completion of over 1000 flying hours in the C-9A Nightingale aircraft and his participation contributed significantly to an increase in the medical technician/aircrew productive flying hours over the previous year.  His effectiveness in training and working with his active duty counterparts contributed significantly to the "togetherness" in missions and resultant professionalism which has been recognized by General Paul K. Charlton, Commander of the Military Airlift Command.  Mr. HUBBARD also did a superior job as Flight Examiner/Instructor in training medical aircrews.  His excellent instructor / student relationships created a positive learning environment for students during medical aircrew evaluations on flights.  He had the excellent ability to provide a constructive critique that is so necessary in training medical technicians to provide optimum patient care.  Mr. HUBBARD resides on a farm in rural Kinmundy with his wife, Junita, and daughters, Anita and Ava.  He recently retired from the U.S. Civil Service Commission"  (A photo of the presentation was included with this article.)


 

Earl D. Huddleston - “The Kinmundy Express” – May 6, 1954 – “Cpl. Earl D. HUDDLESTON, 22, son of Mr. and Mrs. Earl HUDDLESTON, of Kinmundy, will move to Yakima, Wash. firing center this month to participate in Exercise Hill Top with the 44th Infantry Division.  Cpl. HUDDLESTON, whose wife Maraladene, lives in Tacoma, Wash., is a gunner assigned to the division’s 123rd Regiment at Ft. Lewis.  He entered the Army in Jan. 1953.” 

 


 

James E. Huddleston - “The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 5, 1964 –“Captain James E. HUDDLESTON, son of Mrs. Marjorie Z. Correll, Highwood, Ill., completed a 6 week medical service corps office basic course at the Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas.  Capt. Huddleston received instruction in the duties and responsibilities of an Army medical corps officer.  The 25 year old officer is a 1956 graduate of Kinmundy-Alma High School, and a 1963 graduate of Indiana University School of Medicine.  He left last week for a 13-month tour of Korea.”

 


 

(V-78) Joe Hudson

 


 

Vernon Dee Hudson - “The Kinmundy Express” – July 12, 1951 – “Mrs. Mary BOSTON had a basket dinner Sunday for Cpl. Vernon Dee HUDSON, who is stationed in Korea and is home on a 30 day furlough.  The dinner was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. James BOSTON.  There were 63 people attending.”  (A list was included.)

 


 

Wally Hults

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 1, 1953 – “RMS/A Wally HULTS and RMS/A Xon HANNA have finished radio school at Naval Training Center, San Diego, Calif., and spent a 10 day furlough leave here. They returned to the west coast where they will go aboard ship.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 31, 1957 – “Rm2 Wally HULTZ received his discharge from the Navy Jan. 17, after serving 4 years in Hawaii and Japan.  Wally is now at home with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wallace HULTZ.”

 


 

 

 

 

(V-262b) Dwight Ingram

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 8, 1945 – “Tec 5 Dwight INGRAM, son of Mr. and Mrs. Agnes INGRAM, arrived home yesterday after receiving his discharge from Ft. Sheridan the same day.  Dwight entered the service on Jan. 5, 1943, and shipped overseas in April 1944, landing in the Hawaiian Islands.  From there, he went to the Marshall Islands where he was stationed until he started back to the states on Oct. 10.  He landed in Seattle, Wash., Oct. 22nd.  He arrived here on Oct. 31 to spend a 5 day furlough before returning to Ft. Sheridan for his discharge.  Dwight wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon and the American Theater of Operations Ribbon.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Elwin Ingram

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 11, 1945 – “Sgt. Elwin INGRAM is spending a furlough here with his mother, Mrs. Agnes INGRAM.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 25, 1945 – “S. Sgt. Elwin INGRAM received his discharge from the army Oct. 9th at Scott Field, after serving 42 months with the Air Corps as a ground mechanic.  He is here visiting his mother, Mrs. Agnes INGRAM, but will soon leave for Lawrenceville, Ill., where he expects to enter business.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-263b) Glen Ingram

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 4, 1945 – “S. Sgt. Glenn INGRAM arrived here on Sept. 19th to spend a 30 day furlough with his wife, the former Miss Thelma OLDEN, and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed INGRAM of Meacham twp.  Glenn entered the service on Nov. 2, 1942, and shipped overseas on Oct. 6, 1944, landing in France.  From there he went to Germany, Austria and Italy.  He sailed for home on Sept. 9th and landed in New York on the 14th.  He wears the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Good Conduct Medal and the European Theater of Operations Ribbon with 2 stars, representing the battles of Europe and the Rhineland.  After his furlough has expired, he will report to Camp Grant for further instructions.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-264b) Joseph Ingram

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 8, 1945 – “Tec 5 Joseph INGRAM, son of Mrs. Agnes INGRAM, arrived home Nov. 2nd from Ft. Sheridan where he received his discharge the same day.  Joe entered the service May 22, 1942, and shipped overseas Aug. 30, 1942, landing in Scotland.  From there he went to England, then Algeria, then to Italy.  He started back to the states Oct. 7th and landed in Palm Beach, Fla., Oct. 14th.  He arrived here Oct. 18th for a 12 day furlough before returning to Ft. Sheridan to receive his discharge.  Joe wears the Good Conduct Medal and the European Theater of Operations Ribbon with 2 stars, representing the battles of Tunisia and the Rome-Arno Campaign.  Dwight and Joe will busy themselves opening their former place of business, Ingram’s Mill.  And we wish them the best of success in re-establishing their trade.  Another brother, Elwin, who was recently discharged from the army, will not re-enter business with them.  He and his wife moved to Lawrenceville where he expects to enter business in the near future.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-48) Ray Ingram

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - March 18, 1943 - "Swift School: Mr. and Mrs. Frank JONES received a telephone call recently from their daughter, Lora, in New York City that she would be home soon as her husband, Ray INGRAM, would be leaving New York for foreign duty soon."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 25, 1945 – “Ray INGRAM, PHM1 c, and Mrs. INGRAM are announcing the arrival of a daughter born in Centralia Hospital, Oct. 18, named Lynda Rae.  Daddy is sailing around Tokyo somewhere and is supposed to be on his way home.  So he really doesn’t know it as yet.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 29, 1945 – “Ray INGRAM, PhM1c, arrived here Tuesday night and is now a happy ex-sailor, visiting with his wife and small daughter, Lynda Rae, in the Frank JONES home west of town.  He is also visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. I.D. INGRAM.  He had received his discharge from the Navy on Tuesday at Great Lakes.   Ray entered the service Sept. 4, 1942, and spent 18 months in North Africa.  He returned home in Oct. 1944, and spent a very enjoyable 30 day leave with his wife and other relatives.  On Nov. 22, 1944, he was assigned to the Mine Sweeper WMS 458, which floated in the Southwest Pacific Theater.  He is entitled to wear the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Medal, The American Theater Ribbon, The Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon, and the African-Middle Eastern Theater Ribbon.  As to his future, Ray says his old job is waiting for him in Beardstown, but whether he wants to accept it, he hasn’t yet decided.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Robert Ingram

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 22, 1958 – “Receives Discharge: Robert INGRAM of Key West, Florida, received his discharge from the Navy and arrived Friday to be with his wife and daughter, who has been here with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert BEARD and family.”

 


 

Arthur Irwin - “The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 20, 1951 – “- Meacham (from last week): Arthur IRWIN of the U.S. Navy is spending furlough with his wife in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ros SMITH.”

 


 

Merle Jackson - “The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 8, 1945 – “Tec 5 Merle JACKSON, son of Mr. and Mrs. A.J. JACKSON, arrived home Nov. 6th, after receiving his discharge at Camp Grant on Nov. 4th.  Merle was among the first to enter the service from this community, April 17th, 1941.  But due to his age, he was temporarily released and was home again for 4 months.  He was recalled March 12, 1942, and shipped overseas April 17th, 1944, landing on the Isle of Oahu.  From there, he was sent to Guam, where he took part in the invasion.  He also was in the invasion of  Armoc, Leyte.  Here he developed a blood clot in his leg and was evacuated to Saipan and then to the General Hospital, Schofield, Oahu.  He started home Sept. 27, and landed in New York, Oct. 27th.  Merle wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Operations Ribbon with 2 stars, representing the battles of Guam and Leyte, the Philippine Liberation Defense Ribbon.  If you want to see Merle, you will find him right back at his service station, taking up just where he left off.”

 


 

Richard Jackson - “The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 8, 1962 - “Staff Sergeant Richard D. JACKSON, of Clinton, has been named honor graduate of the U.S. Air Force course for missile test equipment mechanics at Lowry AFB, Colo.  Sergeant Jackson, who attained a final average of 93 to win the honor, learned to maintain and operate test equipment associated with the Mace missile weapon system.  He is being reassigned to Orlando AFB, Fla.  A graduate of Clinton Community High School, he is the son of Mr. and Mrs. D.C. Jackson of Clinton.  The Sergeant and his wife, the former Dorothy H. Miggins of Piermont, N.Y., have 2 children.   S.Sgt. Jackson is a grandson of Mr. Charles Gammon of our city.”

 


 

Gene Jadwin - “The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 26, 1953 – “Mr. Gene (Zombie) JADWIN has returned home from Germany after 3 years.”

 


 

Leslie L. Jamison

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 30, 1963 - “Airman Leslie L. JAMISON, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter B. Jamison of Alma, is being reassigned to Lowry AFB, Colo. for technical training as a U.S. Air force weapons specialist.  Airman Jamison who enlisted in the Air Force a short time ago, has completed his initial basic military training here.  He is a 1962 graduate of Kinmundy-Alma High School. (A photo was included with this article.)

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 26, 1963 – “Airman Third Class Leslie L. JAMISON of Alma is being reassigned to a unit of the Pacific Air Forces following his graduation from the U.S. Air Force technical training course for munitions specialist here.  Airman Jamison, son of Mr. and Mrs. Burdette Jamison of Alma, was trained in the maintenance, storage, loading, assembly and safe disposal of explosive munitions.  The airman is a graduate of Kinmundy Alma High School in Kinmundy.  He entered the Air Force in April.”

 


 

 

(V-79) Charles Jasper

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - June 8, 1944 - "Here’s one from Pvt. Charles JASPER, who is mingling with the Chinks over in China. He says: Just thought I would drop you a few lines again and thank you for your trouble of sending the paper to me and to tell you that I am still receiving them. Most of the boys have written you 2 or 3 times and I really enjoy their letters, so I thought they might like one from China. I have been here in China now for about 7 months and I still don’t know much more about the place than I did when I wrote the first time. I got to go on a sight seeing tour awhile back, which proved to be very interesting, but a couple of the boys and myself were a little too venturesome and didn’t stay with the guide so everything wasn’t explained to us. I know what I seen but I don’t know what is was all about. Our first stop was a war plant out in the mountains and just to look at this place you would think all they could make would be straw hats or baskets. We really got a surprise though when we got in the plant because they had modern machinery just like our own. Of course, the plant was scattered among small buildings and part of it was in caves and not in one huge building. A lot of their machines were set right on the ground and in the caves there was no floor at all, only dirt and rock. I saw one machine in one of the caves that made small brass gears and there was a 16 year old Chinese boy at the controls. The machine was several times as big as he was but he knew every part of it. We all thought we would see a lot of crude equipment before we got to the plant, but we sure got a big surprise. We made 2 more stops on our tour after we left the plant where we also ate our dinner in Chinese style and beat our brains out trying to use chop sticks. One of our stops after the plant was some temples and the "Black Dragon Pool". This place was at the foot of a mountain and then the temples ran clear to the top. The Black Dragon Pool was just a small pool of very clear water with loads of fish, big and small. From the Pool there were stone steps leading up the side of the mountain to the temples. You go in one temple out of the other side to more steps leading up to more temples. After the temple we went to a laboratory where they were experimenting on different things, were too deep for me and they also ground lens for microscopes. I didn’t look around very much here because I was getting pretty tired after working all night and climbing up and down from the temples. I went back to the truck to rest while the others had tea with the Chinese. From there we had to go back to camp because it was time for chow and most of us were too tired to go anyplace. We had one more place to go to which was the "Copper Temples", but when the guide ask which it would be, the Temples or back to camp, and vote was back to camp. The trip was a lot more interesting than we all thought it would be and the first chance I get I want to make the trip again, but not when I have worked the night before. Just take my word for it, don’t come to China to see this stuff, because it isn’t worth it when you can see it in the movies back home. As for the rest of China, it is all the same as far as I know and the war still goes on. All of the boys over here are just waiting and hoping for the day when they can start home and every time they read about a strike back in the States, they say "send them gold bricks from over here for 6 months and they won’t strike again". If they had to come over here and work for $50 bucks a month, do without mail for a week or two at a time, and eat eggs when your grub runs short, then they would know how lucky they really are. You might say we would like to have some eggs and we would too, if half of them were not rotten. Now don’t get me wrong that we have eggs all the time 3 times a day, because we don’t, but some times when the grub runs low and they can’t get meat, we have eggs for a week or two. Most of the time our meals are good and we have swell quarters to live in. We have barracks which are divided into 6 rooms and 6 men to a room. We have double decked beds, which are pretty good only once in a while the man on top falls through as happened in our room a few nights back. We have a locker per man for our clothes and 2 dressers with a large drawer and a small one for shaving articles and other things you might have to put in them. We get our laundry done free by the Chinese and have house boys who make our bed and clean up the rooms. We have to drink bottled water, so the house boys get our water for us in our canteens. They also fix the holes and tears in our clothes or mosquito nets for a small charge of a few dollars in Chinese money. Of course, all GIs in China don’t have this nice a set up, but we were just lucky when we were assigned to this job and it sure beats driving trucks. I look to be back on trucks before we get back to the States, but I hope our time is up overseas before we do as driving over here on these roads is a man killer. Well, Mr. VALLOW, I have written about all there is to tell about this place and from the looks of the pages I have written enough. If I write any more I will have to sign my name a author. I hope this explains to you a little on how we live over here. We really have it soft although we have to work pretty hard sometimes only right now that the Monsoon season is on, we have it soft all the way around. I will close now before I think of something else, so will thank you again for the paper which I enjoy very much.

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Nov. 9, 1944 - "Here’s one from PFC Chas. JASPER, who is still sojourning in China. He says: Just thought I would drop you a few lines again to thank you and let you know the paper is still coming through. Sometimes I get 4 or 5 all in one bundle, and other times one at a time, but no matter how they get here, I always enjoy them. The last one I got as where Rex GAMMON wrote. I enjoyed his letter very much. I wish he would get to come over the hump sometime so I could see him. I got to see Dale BROOM not very long before he started home. I sure wish I could have left with him. I hope by the time this letter gets there, he is safe and sound. Tonight is my night off and I am in the recreation hall writing this letter. They have a big ping-pong tournament going on and some of the boys are beating out a few hot licks on the piano, bass fiddle, flute, accordion, and clarinet. We have some pretty good entertainment over here and I guess that is more than a lot of the boys can say who are stationed all over the country. Last week, Pat O’BRIAN, Jinx FALKENBERG, Betty EDEN, and a couple of others put on a show for us. They played 3 nights in a row so that all the boys would get to go. Tomorrow Jinx and one of her troupe are putting on an exhibition tennis game for the boys, but I won’t get to see that as I have to work. Pat O’BRIAN was a riot with his Irish jokes, but Betty EDEN was the most popular and I guess, the main reason was, she came out in a bathing suit. A white woman in a bathing suit who can twist herself up like a pretzel is really a riot over here. There was another fellow with them whose name I have forgotten, who played a guitar and sang "Senatra stay away from my Gal". That is a song you should hear if you haven’t already which I guess you have. Well Norris, it is getting rather late and I am missing out on a lot of good sleep, so guess I had better sign off. Maybe this is a good way to let some of the boys know that I would like to hear from them. I know they all like to get mail and I do too. So if they will write I will be very glad to answer. Also, if you ever come to China, just ask the boy with the Chinese soldiers who unloads your baggage which could even be me. If they know a guy by the name of JASPER, look me up, air freight, that’s me and any one who has ever seen me can sure remember a mug like mine. Thanks again, to you and every one else who helps in sending the paper to the boys. The best of luck to you all."

 

"The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 6, 1945 – “PFC Charles JASPER, son of Mr. and Mrs. Chris JASPER, arrived home Nov. 25 after receiving his discharge at Camp Grant the same day.  Charles entered the service March 12, 1943, and shipped overseas July 31, 1943, landing in India.  From there he ‘flew the hump’ into China, where he was stationed until he started home in Sept.   After spending 3 weeks on the high seas, he landed in New York, Nov. 21.  PFC JASPER wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon, the Presidential Citation, and the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with 1 star representing the Burma Campaign.  We are mighty glad to see Charles home again, this being his first trip home since he entered the service.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 21, 1946 –“Charles JASPER is a patient in the Veterans’ Hospital at Marion, Ill., where he is receiving treatment for a nervous disturbance.  Mr. and Mrs. Chris JASPER spent yesterday with him. “

 

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 28, 1946 –“Charles JASPER returned home from the Veteran’s Hospital at Marion last week where he had been receiving treatments.  He is suffering from a nervous disturbance but is reported some better at this time.”

 


 

(V-424) Shae Jamison

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-80) Charles "Beck" Jenkins

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 27, 1945 – “PFC Charles JENKINS is enjoying a 30 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert JENKINS near Alma.  As soon as his furlough has expired, he will report to Camp Grant for further instruction.  PFC JENKINS entered the service Dec. 2, 1942, and sailed overseas in Jan. 1945, landing in France.  He was a member of the 13th Airborne Division.  He wears the European Theater of Operations Ribbon with 2 stars representing the battles of Rhineland and Central Europe.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

(V-425) Dickie Jenkins

 


 

(V-426) Heath Jenkins

 


 

Jackie Jenkins

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 19, 1945 – “Pleasant Grove: Pvt. Jackie JENKINS of Camp Gordon, Ga. is spending a 14 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Paul JENKINS and other relatives.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 24, 1946 –“Pleasant Grove (from last week): Pvt. Jack JENKINS, who has been in the Hawaiian Islands, came home Wednesday for a 30 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Paul JENKINS, and other relatives.”

 


 

 

(V-65) James Erschel Jenkins

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Jan. 11, 1945: "This one is really not a letter but a little story written by Pvt. Erschel JENKINS, who is now in Holland. He entitles this "My Life in an Ordnance Evacuation". Here it is: A lazy fog was overhead, it was around the middle of the month of July. I, along with many soldiers strained my eyes for our first glimpse of France. The crossing had been calm and very foggy. The watch of our L.S.T. really had a job as at that time many mines were floating in the waters. Every box with an odd shape, we steered around. Soon land was sighted; a sailor who had been there many times volunteered the information that we were looking at the Cherbourg Peninsula. We dropped anchor along with the other ships in the convoy and the next morning around noon we ran our ship into the sandy beach. That afternoon at 2:30 when the tide had gone out sufficiently for us to disembark, the doors or mouth of the L.S.T. swung open and out of it passed vehicles of all types loaded down with men and baggage. I and the vehicle I was driving was among the last as the light vehicles were elevated to the top deck. Off we rolled in the sandy beaches. Here was a knocked out German 88 on one side. Barbed wire entanglements were only a few weeks before; many a man had shed his blood so we, the other thousands of other men, could land in France. Yes, we saw our first battlefield, where the beginning of the end of Germany started. On we rolled inland for a few miles, there we pulled off into a field to rest or eat as we could not go to our area except under darkness. Our vehicles were camouflaged and then about all the boys ate their K rations that were issued in England and if I remember correctly they tasted damn good. It was then some time before midnight we started on our way. It was really a hard blackout trip. I got the headache so I asked my buddy, Bob LANGFORD, to take over. The roads were a mess, as they had torn up things for miles and the roads were dusty and rough. Everyone was a little jittery because all round us was gun flashes and the sound of battle. That night I saw the flashes and heard planes roaring and flares falling. For the first time in my life after near 2 years in the army, the day had come - D-Day. After a nerve racking 7 hours, we reached our area. It wasn’t far, but as I said before, the French roads were not made for vehicles such as we have, especially the roads of Normandy. We set to work and put up our tents and then the shovel I had started to use, of course, a foxhole. A night or so passed then we were awakened by a (Jerry) German plane that came over regular to see what he could see, of course, it was a recon plane, but the AA didn’t bother to shoot as it would give our positions away. Anyway, we called him Bed Check Charlie, for the name we all figured, was best. Anyway my tent was pitched where I could roll right in my foxhole. We were in earnest, our practice was in the past. From day to day we saw the ruins of battle vehicles strewn along the roads and bomb and shell craters everywhere. We went thru the town of Volognes where nothing but shells of buildings were left. It is one of the most destructed towns I’ve seen in that vicinity to date. I couldn’t say that because Aachen has the record and some seem to think St. Lo. We were in the vicinity of the town of Bricquebec which you have known from the news of the past. The conquest of Cherbourg was over. We at this time, weeks ago can’t say when, but will tell you later we controlled the whole peninsula. After a few days of rain our enormous tank movers were sticking all over the orchard. Some of the boys sat in the old orchard on the first Sunday sitting on their helmets with their guns and gas masks by their side. After a few days rain, we moved to another apple orchard. Normandy is nothing but orchards and little fields. The people back there then were not too friendly as they had not fared so badly under the German. They finally warmed up to us and cognac and hard cider was produced by most of them, especially if they thought they might get a few cigarettes. We some times were given fresh eggs by many. Anyway the eggs were darn good compared to the C or K rations that we were getting. From this vicinity I often had runs into Cherbourg and Barneville. Cherbourg is a quaint old city of narrow streets built upon the bluffs over looking the sea. Here we saw the evidence of our Naval bombardments. They had done a good job and deserve much credit for the quick victory of Cherbourg. At Barneville was a large resort area along the sea. A Red Cross club was soon set up and we enjoyed many good baths in the sea. Salt water, as you know, doesn’t clean one too well, but we felt much better. In Bricquebec the public showers of a hotel was turned over to the Americans to use free. Here I had my first hot shower in France for about a month. In a few days after a big break through on July 25 we left Normandy for Brittany and was bivouacked in the vicinity of Fourgeres. Here we had a good area in a large timber. On our way to this area we experienced our first flower tossings and the people lining the roads with bottles of wine and cider waving their hands. We were moving otherwise, I am afraid there would have been some or many tipsy soldiers. Fourgeres was wrecked, the people seemed to not be certain whether the (Boche) Germans or Americans did it. Not many of the homes were left there for the people to come back to. One unforgettable sight was a house completely torn in half as if one had taken a saw to divide it for a show purpose. The bath tub and stool in the bathroom, table and a chair, bed and dresser were in sight along with a portion of the kitchen. Rain had blown in upon it for many days. They were lucky because many couldn’t find a piece of their stuff. We were not far from a little lake that was made into a (W.P.) Water Point. Again we took our baths below it. The first thing we looked for was a place to bathe as the roads were so dusty when dry. Mortain had not fallen then and the Germans were trying to cut us off from Normandy. It was useless as they soon found out. By this time we knew we were here to stay. Before we moved from that area, the people were returned to Foureres on wagons and carts pulled by donkeys or behind bicycles - people had all their worldly possessions. Many times the animal had all he could pull and the family wearily trudged along beside. The next city of any size that we moved close to was Lo Mans. The smaller towns around where we were camped had not felt the arm of war like the larger places. This time we were closed to a river. Here we got to swim a lot. It happed to be quite warm there. Le Mans is a nice city. It is one of the prettiest I have ever seen. They had some of the prettiest flower bed arrangements around the monuments in town of any place that I’ve ever seen. One was a sundial with each section a different color flower. Le Mans was off the limits so I didn’t see too much except going through after rations. Only the area around the rail road yards seemed to be damaged the most. It was through here on the Brest and Paris Railroad many Americans traveled during the last war or I may say World War I. It was not long until we moved again. The tanks we haul must reach where they are need quickly. Many of the crews have delivered tanks in areas under direct enemy fire and we would bring them back for repairs. With a system like ours, we couldn’t hardly loose and I say we are bound to win any war. We moved in the vicinity of Fountainebleau which is on the Seine River only 45 miles from Paris. When I say vicinity I mean it was the closest town of any size. It was here we first met the type of people that France is noted for. They dressed in the best clothes and enjoyed spending their evenings at the famous side walk cafes, which, I have heard so much about. Fountainebleau is a town of much historical interest. Here the castles of many Kings of France stands. It is the second largest in Europe. I spent a part of one afternoon in going through it. It has the harp of Josephine, Napoleon’s wife and his bed only 5 feet long and all the various paintings, etc. Oh yes, the wine the French make I first heard was the best but it didn’t taste too good. The champagne is excellent. It sells for 8 to 10 dollars a quart. It all depends on how much lingo you can talk. Most of us went to Paris for a day; our commanding officer wanted us all to have the memory of Paris to take home with us. Paris is undescribable. It would take a month to see it all. I went up the Eiffel Town, saw Notre Dame, The Arch of Triumph, and many other things that brought great interest. I thought the clothing, I mean hats our women wore were fantastic, but you should see what the women look like here with such odd looking hats. How they dress so well, no I don’t know, but as one English speaking Frenchman said, "they spend their last franc on their clothes." The girls are beautiful but can’t beat the American girls. I guess it is due to several things. If I could understand their words it would be easier to like them, is my opinion. Yes, Paris is the city of cities, it is nice and we Americans got a very warm reception there. It was about a week after it’s liberation. We have left all of that behind and it is just a memory now. Things are much different here in Holland, but I have seen some beautiful places in Luxembourg and Belgium, such as forest trees planted in rows, they however were tall pines. Holland I always thought was one windmill after another, but I’ve only seen one and again this is all in the past. Aachen is nothing but a city that will take many years to be the same. Believe me, if we do them all that way on the road to Berlin, they will surely think twice before the so-called Master Race raises it’s self toward war again. Well, the rest must wait for another day to be told. Perhaps the end is not far off. Naturally, we all want to get home but a lot remains to be finished here and in the Pacific. Let us hope the Japs fall soon after the Jerries."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 3, 1946 –“PFC James E. JENKINS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben JENKINS, arrived home on New Year’s Day after receiving his discharge at Camp Grant the day previous.  PFC JENKINS entered the service in Jan. 1943 and shipped overseas in May 1944, landing in England.  From there he went to France where he was stationed.  He wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon, and the European Theater Ribbon with 4 stars, representing the battles of Normandy, Northern France, Ardennes, and Central Europe.  He landed in Boston on Christmas Day.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 10, 1946 –“A picture was printed of PFC James E. JENKINS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben JENKINS, who arrived home on New Year’s Day after arriving back in the states on Christmas day.  He served in the European Theater.”

 


 

 

(V-81) Ralph "Pug" Jenkins

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - March 16, 1944 - "Here’s one from Pvt. Ralph JENKINS. ‘Pug’ recently landed in merry old England and appears to like the country. He says: Thought I would drop you a few lines to let you know I am in England, and I’m hoping to get a paper soon. I haven’t got a paper now for almost a month and I certainly miss it. Well I suppose you would like to hear a little about the country of England. Well, the weather here is awful, it is damp, foggy, rainy, and once in awhile the sun shines, the policemen wear tall steel helmets, just like the pictures you have seen in history books. The people here live a hard and difficult life on account of food rationing and we soldiers are also rationed, we get 2 razor blades a week and 7 packages of cigarettes. We are living on an old English Settlement and it is a beautiful place. The English people go for flowers and shrubbery and the grass is green now and the country is beautiful. I have changed my U.S.A. currency for English currency and it is some job to keep it straight and know how much one has got. Well, Mr. VALLOW, I got to close and hope I get the paper soon so I can read the boys letters."

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - July 13, 1944 - "Here’s our first letter received from France and it’s from Pvt. Ralph JENKINS, better known to his friends as "Pug". He rather liked England and from the way he talks, he might fall in love with France. He says: Well, here I am again and this time from France. Thought I would drop you a little about this country, etc. France is a very level country. They have a lot of rock and hedge fences. The people have seen lots of hardships and they are rationed terrible. They wear wooden shoes and only get 3 cigarettes a day. Just think how it would be if the people back there could only get 3 cigs a day. I know it would be awful on me. But we get plenty of cigarettes. That’s one thing that helps me out a lot. I haven’t had any mail since I’ve been in France and I am sure dying to get some. The mail man told us yesterday that there would be mail for us in about a week. So that isn’t so bad, as there are only 6 more days to go. Haven’t seen a boy from home since I have been in England and France, but hope to before long. My brother is over here but I haven’t heard from him in over 3 weeks now. The houses the French people live in look like our barns back home. And I sorta wish I had taken French in High School. I heard a couple of Frenchmen talking the other day and it seemed like children just learning to talk. Maybe I might get onto it before long. Well, I would like to write more, but I can’t think of anything else this time. So will close hoping we hurry up and get to Berlin, so we can come home for good and I’m telling you it can’t be too soon for me. Well, Norris, I want to thank you again for the paper and here’s hoping I get one before long. So for now I’m saying ‘Cherio’."

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Sept. 21, 1944  - "Here’s a letter from Pvt. Ralph JENKINS, better known as Pug, who is doing his bit in France. He says: Well, Mr. VALLOW, I have been in France for some time now, also my brother is over here but I haven’t had a chance to see him as yet. I tried awful hard to see him while we were both in France, but never got to see him. We get mail from each other in one day’s time so we can’t be too far apart. I haven’t seen any one that I know since I have been over here, but hope to one of these days. I met one boy from Kell, Ill. I was talking to him and he knew Harry BURGE and family, but that is the closest one that I’ve ever met from home. We sure are mopping up these Germans and make no different of what you hear on the radio, take my advice because I know as I am over here. We are really driving hard and fast. I don’t see how this war can last much longer and I am sure by Christmas time, we will see the end of it and what a happy bunch of boys there’s going to be in France. General PATTON and the boys in the tanks are really doing some splendid work. The war news certainly sounds good and it is good. I was working up in the front lines with Charles KLINE’s division and did we turn the heart on these Germans. I will have a few stories to tell you when I get back. Oh did I say a few? Sure would like to see some nice weather. It has been very chilly and it has been raining almost every day for over a week and it certainly makes it bad over here trying to sleep, etc. and especially when we eat. When we go through the chow line and it is raining it’s awful because by the time one gets started eating his messkit is full of water. The sun has started shining now but it is likely to cloud up and rain before long. Anyway, I certainly hope it doesn’t because I have a little washing that I should do. Sure am glad when I get my washing done, so I can get my correspondence caught up. Got a paper last night, first one I have got for a long time, and I certainly enjoyed it very much, believe me. It was the paper about PFC Henry HINKLEY of Alma being killed in action. Sure hated to hear of that and also about Manuel WELSH. Wish I could write to these people and try to express my sympathy toward them, because I know what these boys went through with, especially Manuel, as I was on the front lines the day he got killed. As I said, I would like to express my sympathy. I will in this letter to their folks and relatives, they can read this in the paper. Anyway, they gave their lives for a great country in the world. Although, I know how they feel about the situation. Well folks, maybe this war won’t last so long. Anyway I know you all back home are hoping and praying just like we are doing over here. I don’t see how this thing can last much longer. Mr. VALLOW, I’m sending you a couple of pieces of French money, paper bills. I am sending you a five franc note as a souvenir. It is worth 10 cents in our money back there. France is a beautiful country. It has beautiful grain fields. There are hardly any barb-wire fence, mostly thick hedge rows and rocks for fences. This area where we are at now is very beautiful. We can see for miles and miles. The people over here are rationed terrible. They get 3 cigarettes a day and a package of French cigarettes cost $3 a package here. Of course, all the soldiers get plenty of cigarettes through the cigarette manufacturing companies, who sends cigarettes to the Armed Forces. The people here, practically all of them, wear wooden shoes. They are certainly awful to look at besides trying to wear them. We trade cigarettes now and then for eggs. The French says F.’s and it is spelled aeuf in French. I have tried to learn French from them, but can’t and it sounds crazy. I hope I get out of here before I do learn it. Well, I suppose, the peaches are in full swing by now, how I could enjoy a good one to eat right this minute. From your paper I see where all of my buddies are getting married, and I also see by the paper we get over here and the radio that the St. Louis Cardinals are going fine, and I’m sure glad of that, as they are my team. Hope that the St. Louis Browns win the American League Pennant. What a time I would have if I was there. I would like to see them play. Only hope that the Cardinals win the world series. Well, Mr. VALLOW, I suppose you are tired of hearing me blow off, so will close for this by saying thanks for your paper and keep the good work up and maybe it won’t last much longer. Well so long for this time and tell everyone hello and here’s hoping to see every one real soon."

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Nov. 9, 1944 - "Here’s a nice letter from Pvt. Ralph JENKINS, who is now somewhere in Germany. He says: Haven’t written you for some time, so thought I would drop you a few lines to let you know I’m well and feeling O.K. Although I have sorta got a head cold. Well Norris, I received a paper yesterday, and it certainly seemed awful nice to get it after going about a month without one. The paper I received yesterday had my letter I wrote you and also Manuel’s, but Norris, was very surprised to hear my letter was the first one from France, now maybe, it will be the first one from Germany. I have got plenty of birthday cards and I’m saying thanks for everyone of them, and here’s hoping I’m home for my next one. Well, Norris, how is everyone around the old hometown, suppose it seems deserted. Well, I got my state ballot yesterday and have already marked it and sent it in. Well, last night the Cardinals won the World Series, my old team came in the pinches and won another World Series. We heard all the games over here and they came in very good. Maybe we will all be home for the world series next year. Well, how does the news sound back home, it sounds sorta good over here. I only hope the Germans get smart before too long and give up. America is too powerful for these other countries and we have so much more to be thankful for. If you could see how happy these Germans are when they are captured. They are very happy when they become our prisoners and they say they are glad because the war is over for them. Well, Norris, you have heard a lot of people talk about eating 3 meals in 3 states in one day. Well, I can say more than that. One day I ate breakfast in France, dinner in Belgium, and supper in Luxembourg. So that is a pretty good record and that’s something a lot of people can’t say and never will be able to say. I guess I was sorta lucky to do something like that. Well, I guess the weather is pretty nice at home, but it’s sorta damp and chilly over here. Well Norris, How is Guin coming along. Guess he is still in Michigan, anyway, I hope so. I hear from my brother often, who is over here and would like very much to see him. Maybe I will before long. And would like to see Charles KLINE. I was up one day with Charles KLINE’s outfit, rendering first aid for his 37th Tank Bn., but I never saw him. I was hoping to see him, but I guess I wasn’t lucky. I read your Zatso column and really enjoyed it very much and also a Sgt. from my company read it and he seemed to like it very much. Well, Norris, I don’t know much more for this time so will sign off. I’m sending you a post card from England. I’ve carried it with me ever since I left England. Anyway, it’s sorta a souvenir in a way. Well, I enjoy you paper very much and don’t know what I would do without it. So keep it rolling and thanks a lot for the fine work you have been doing. I hope before long I’ll be able to walk up personally and shake your hand and thank you for doing such a fine job sending us the paper. So for now, I’ll say be good and careful and I’m saying hello to every one in and around the old home town."

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Dec. 14, 1944 -"Here’s one from Pvt. Ralph E. JENKINS, who is now in Luxembourg. He says: Thought I would try and throw a little ink your way, as I haven’t written to you for some time and to let you know I have another new APO number. It seems as though every time I turn around I have a new number starring me in the face. Guess it is because I am moving around so much. We haven’t been moving around so much. We haven’t been moving hardly any the last couple weeks. But, of course, we can never tell exactly when we will. I have been thinking that the war might end one of these days and maybe it will, but I believe we will still be fighting until summer. Of course, we are progressing yet taking city after city, but the weather is awful on our troops. But old Blood and Guts is making another progressive drive and maybe this war won’t last too long at that. Anyway, let’s hope and pray. It’s horrible to see our boys fighting and night and day through this terrible weather. It is always snowing and raining and about a week ago we had four inches of snow and the ground is never dry it is always mud, mud and mud. I never saw such weather in all my life and here’s hoping I never see anything like this again, it’s simply awful. We haven’t seen sunshine for some time. It might shine for a few minutes a day, but don’t forget I said minutes. This place where we are is a small farming village and all the people here know is work. The women go out and do men’s jobs and lots of the men at home would say no, if they had to work like the women do here. These women pitch hay like a man and they get a sack of feed and carry it up these hills just like it was nothing. They drive the oxen and take care of them just like you would take care of your car. They are very religious and go to church every Sunday. Talk about people being rationed, they haven’t had a pair of shoes for 4 years and also clothing, but they get by. It is really awful to see how these people live. They don’t know hardly what candy is until we got here. We give them a piece now and then and when they get it they smile and say, "Danke" which means thank you. All of these people speak German because they had to put up with them for quite some time. The people here told us that the German soldiers ate very poor food and only had one suit of clothes. They never had enough clothes to supply every soldier with 2 suits like we have. We have a boy from New Jersey who can speak German very good and he is a good friend of mine. Well, how is everything around the old home town. Guess it is just like it always was. Got to close now and eat chow, will finish afterwards. (Just got back from chow). So will try to write you a few more lines. It has been about 2 weeks since I got a paper, but suppose will get one soon. All the papers are generally a month late but just the same I enjoy them very much. Keep up the good work, don’t know what the boys would do without it. Well, Mr. VALLOW, I don’t know much more, so will sign off and read the paper, "Stars and Stripes". Well, maybe this thing won’t last much longer, anyway, let’s hope so. So, until next time, I’ll say, so long and keep the press rolling."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 3, 1945 – “Here’s a nice letter from PFC Ralph JENKINS dated 15 April, Somewhere in Germany.  ‘Pug’ is a litter bearer in the medics.  He says: Well, here I am again.  It’s been sometime since I’ve wrote you and thanked you for the paper.  Our mail isn’t coming through any too well.  But I suppose it will soon.  Well, what do you think of the war situation?   It looks very good right now.  The Ninth Army was reported 17 miles from Berlin and PATTON is running loose again.  I don’t think this thing can last much longer.  Anyway, I certainly hope not.  By the way, I am in the Third Army under old Blood and Guts and my brother is in the Ninth Army.  I am away from my company right now; one of my buddies is with me.  We are sorta a dispensary for a company of engineers, and also giving first aid when needed.  Most of the time I am up with the infantry which isn’t any too good as you probably know.  This company of engineers are very good to us; they build bridges, etc.  Well, how is everything in the old hometown?  I suppose it’s practically the same old thing every day.  I haven’t had any mail for almost 3 weeks, but of course, with PATTON driving so much, guess it’s sorta hard for them to get it to us.  I would certainly enjoy some letters now.  Maybe, I’ll get some today.  This town where we are stationed in now is a rather large town.  It has 5 German Hospitals.  So the first day we pulled in, I went to get some medicine from a German doctor for a boy who has a skin disease.  And the hospitals are in bad shape.   For instance, they had some of their boys who had wounds and very severe wounds.  Well, believe it or not, they didn’t even have enough bandages to bandage their own boys wounds.  When we see things like that, we often wonder why they are still fighting.  Most of the German civilians are tired of war and are ready to see it end.  What a swell day it’s going to be when it is finished.  The weather here has been very changeable.  We have had some nice weather, but for the past 2 weeks, it’s been mostly cloudy and a little rain now and then.  Well, don’t know much more so will close by giving my regards to everyone and thanks a lot for the paper.   Keep the press rolling because I know all the boys like to receive your paper.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 14, 1945 – “First Class Private Ralph E. JENKINS, Medical Dept., Medical Collecting Company, United States Army, for meritorious achievement in connection with military operations against the enemy from 1 July 1944 to 19 March 1945, in France, Belgium, Luxembourg, and Germany.  During the months of active combat, Private JENKINS has consistently demonstrated the utmost conscientiousness and willingness to serve to the limits of his endurance and capabilities.  Disregarding the dangers to himself, he has repeatedly volunteered for duty in the front lines, always eager to be in the place where his services were most urgently needed.  The cool courage under fire and high devotion to duty displayed by Private JENKINS were an inspiration to others and a credit to himself and the armed forces.  He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben JENKINS of this city, and has been in the service for 2½ years.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 2, 1945 – “Mr. and Mrs. Ben JENKINS received a letter from their son, Cpl. Ralph E. JENKINS, telling how happy he was made by meeting a couple of boys from the old hometown, who were Harold ROBB and Russell SHAFFER.  The boys spent several evenings together talking about the good old days back in Kinmundy and they are planning on being together quite often.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 9, 1945 – “Here’s a nice letter from Cpl. Ralph JENKINS, dated 26 July, Bad Steben, Germany.  He enclosed a picture of himself, Russell SHAFFER and Harold ROBB, taken together.  Don’t you know these boys were tickled pink with this meeting.  Here is what he says: Haven’t written you for some time, so thought I would write you a few lines this morning.  First of all, I want to thank you for the paper, which I have been getting regular since the war ended.  And I certainly enjoy it.  When mother doesn’t write all the news, I get it in the paper.  As far as coming home soon I don’t really know.  We are doing a little training, waiting for the order to come in; where we are going, etc.  It seems funny to me - boys going home with 5, 6, 7, and 8 months overseas duty overseas and here we sit, been overseas 18 months going on 19, of course, by us being a separate company, I guess, they forgot us.  We have worked with a number of divisions such as the 82nd Airborne Div., 83rd Infantry Div., 8th Infantry Div., 9th Infantry Div., 4th Armored Div., 11th Armored Div., and others.  Now for the most interesting paragraph of this letter.  It is a story which won’t happen very often.  This town Bad Steben, is a very small town about the size of Kinmundy.  So here a couple of weeks ago, I was taking some prisoners to a hospital and on my way back I ran into Russell SHREFFLER, better known around home as ‘Germany’.  And he is the first one I met since I have been overseas.  I was really surprised and so was he.  So we stood and talked for about 5 minutes, then he said, “Do you know that Harold ROBB is here?”  Then I did nearly faint.  So after he told me Harold was in town, I said, “Well, let’s go see him.”  So we looked him up.  So when we looked Harold up, we went down to our Yank Club and had a nice conversation.  We talked about the old home the most, and our experience overseas.  I guess you can say we had a little reunion of our own.  And here the other day, Russell was shipped out to some other Infantry Division as he is a low point soldier like most of us, and Harold is leaving Sunday, but he isn’t being sent out of his division, he is only going to another company of the 385th Infantry Regt.  I have been with Harold practically every night.  We live on the same street, he lives about 2 blocks from me and to think I was here in this town for a week and a half so was he, and we never knew it.  Anyway we met and how happy we are.  We have been with each other practically every night.  One Sunday, Russell got a jeep and we went for a ride to take some pictures and to try and find Bill WILSON, but he had been shipped out 3 or 4 days.  So we missed him or there would have been 4 hometown boys from a little town meeting in a little town.  Anyway, we went over and saw the Russian soldiers where their line met ours and there took some pictures of the 3 of us together.  I am sending you one, they came out very good and we were certainly glad of that.  This world isn’t so big after all.  Well Norris, I don’t know much more so will close.  Hope you like the picture.  Thanks again for the paper and here’s hoping I’ll be there soon to come in and thank you personally and that will be a great pleasure.  So until I see you all I can say is keep the press rolling because every one of us is enjoying your paper very much.  Well, will sign off to eat dinner, as it is 10 minutes till 12 o’clock.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 9, 1945 – “Mr. and Mrs. Ben JENKINS received a letter from their son, Cpl. Ralph E. JENKINS, telling what a surprise he got when his brother, Pvt. James E. JENKINS came to see him on a 24 hour pass.  The boys were home together 2 years ago in July, and this is the first time they have met.  He went to see Harold ROBB, who is stationed nearby.  Pvt. James is stationed in Furth, Germany, and Ralph in Bad Steben, Germany.  They are about 100 miles apart.  The boys had a grand time together, visiting and taking pictures.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 6, 1945 – “Cpl. Ralph JENKINS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben JENKINS, arrived home Nov. 28 after receiving his discharge at Camp Grant that same day.  Ralph entered the service Oct. 20, 1942, and shipped overseas Feb. 10, 1944, landing in England.  From there he went to France, Belgium, Luxembourg, and Germany.  He started home Nov. 11, landing in Boston, Nov. 23.  Cpl. JENKINS wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon, the American Theater Ribbon, the Bronze Star Medal and the European Theater Ribbon with 5 stars representing the battles of Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Central Germany, and Ardennes.  As to his future, Ralph says after he gets filled up on his mother’s cooking, he will be in the market for a good job.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-338) Robert Jenkins

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Apr. 22, 1948 - Robert Deane JENKINS, son of Robert M. and Mary (WRIGHT) JENKINS, was born May 27, 1927, in Alma, and died on Apr. 8, 1949 in the Veterans’ Hospital at Marion at the age of 20 years, 10 months and 12 days.   He served in the U.S. Navy for 14 months or more in WWII.  “Bob” as he was familiarly called, had been in ill health the past few weeks, but was never one to complain, bearing his illness cheerfully, although he suffered intensely near the end.  He graduated from Kinmundy H.S. on May 30, 1946, and entered the Naval Service June 2nd at the same year, enlisting earlier.  He never united with any church but before his death he said he was trusting in the Lord.  He was preceded in death by an infant sister several years his senior.  Others surviving are his parents, two brothers, Charles W. and Shirley E., two grandparents, Elder W.E. WRIGHT, and Mrs. Nellie JENKINS and step-grandmother, Mrs. W.E. WRIGHT, uncles, aunts, cousins and a host of friends.  Services were held in the Alma Methodist church and interment was in Martin Cemetery under the auspices of Kinmundy Post 519 American Legion.  Casket bearers were a very close friend of “Bob’s”, Robert GAIN of Salem; 3 classmates, Calvin BARBEE, Keith GREEN, and Junior GARRETT; also Richard GRAY and Wayne ROBB of Kinmundy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Aug. 31, 1944 - Edward Jezek

"Here’s one from Tec. 5, Edward JEZEK, who is in France. He dated his letter Aug. 10 and has this to say. It has been some time since I wrote you. So, now I can’t see any reason why, for it is a beautiful day, sun shining and a nice breeze, but one can’t get to comfortable in writing for we have to duck now and then. I will try to give you a brief idea of where I have been, what I have seen and done. First of all, I have been in half of the states, most of them Eastern ones, but none has been so nice as ours. Altho, they have their good points as we have. So much for that. I was in England for some time, found it very interesting in historical places. As I had always heard we had this and that in the old country, while here I had the opportunity to visit London. Quite some place, not as good as ours, but they certainly do have some good subways. I was told the best in the world, and on top of that they are used for several purposes, such as air raid shelters, transportation and other reasons. I also visited ‘Big Ben’, Buckingham Palace, the Whispering Gallery, London Bridge, and several other places that I’ll tell you about on my return home. Probably the other boys over here have told you the rest so I’ll not finish with it. For France, it is one terrible place, only God and Uncle Sam’s ground forces will know what is going on until after the war is over. You may read and hear a lot, but you people will never know. About Guin’s statement that he had about our wounded is exactly true. I am sure glad that he had the privilege to write it. And it will give the people some idea of how our wounded are cared for. Really marvelous. I am like Charles Joseph, if the people at home only knew how hard our boys are fighting at the front, they would sweat an extra drop more. For those pictures you people see are after a place is taken in a matter of hours or days. The front lines are hell, I know for I have been there. And about the paper. You should have done that a long time ago, for I see no reason why one man should carry such a load. It is not asking too much from our little city or town in sending the paper to each and everyone of us for the paper means as much to me as a letter from our mother or father. You see we can’t write when we want to, only as time permits us. So everyone at home do your best in writing or sending clippings of papers to a soldier. He will more than appreciate it. I will have to end this as I could go on forever, but it will keep until we get home. Thanks a million for the paper and tell everyone hello for me."

 


 

John E. Jezek

"The Kinmundy Express" - Jan. 6, 1944 - "Here’s V-Mail, written on Dec. 16th by Cpl. John JEZEK who is sojourning in North Africa. He’s in the hospital, or was at that time, but didn’t say what for. Here’s what he has to say: As I’m in the hospital now. I will take the time to write you these few lines, which I have been intending to do for quite some time, but just couldn’t get around to it. But now I just lay around, smoke cigs, and read, though first comes my letter writing. You don’t know how much I thank you for the paper. You don’t know how much you appreciate it until you are a long ways from home. So thanks again. As you probably know I am in North Africa and there’s not much I can tell you as Major A BROOM, Jr., has told you everything that I could tell you, so I won’t waste any time on the subject. I suppose the old town is the same old place, no new changes made, but any way it’s ‘Home Sweet Home’. Now I must take a dose of mineral oil, so I must say so long."

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Aug. 31, 1944 - "With the 1st Cavalry Division, U.S. Army in Korea - (Delayed) Kinmundy, Ill. Army man in serving on the Korean front at a signal man in the 1st Cavalry’s 13th Signal Co.;  Private First Class John E. JEZEK, son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis JEZEK, son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis JEZEK, Kinmundy, is in the 1st Cavalry’s 13th Signal Co.  JEZEK’s unit completely installs and operates all Calvary communications equipment, including hundreds of miles of telephone lines and scores of high frequency radios and teletypewriters." 

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Dec. 7, 1944 - "Here’s one from Cpl. John E. JEZEK, who is now in Southern France. He says: Here it is Sunday evening and what a dull evening. So, to keep my mind occupied, I could think of nothing better than dropping you a few lines. Since I’ve been in France, I’ve had no papers. So, I’ll have plenty of reading some day, and soon, I hope. We’ve been in Southern France now for sometime and I must say it is a very beautiful country. The people are so nice and friendly, and I must say it is quite an improvement over North Africa. Rather a nice city I’m in, and it is fairly large. So, I’ve been doing quite a bit of gazing about. I was amazed at some of the things they had on display. So, I’ve done a lot of window shopping. Mostly, civilian clothes. I’ll think no more of women window shopping. Anything that has gold or silver in it, we can’t purchase unless we have the equal amount in return. Their shoes no more are made with leather or rubber soles, maybe, still a few. But the majority has wooden shoes, like in Holland, I guess, but do they make a noise when walking down the street. I’m sending something here I should of several months ago, honest, had all the good intentions of sending it. It may be too old by now, but I don’t think so, or at least I hope not. My brother, Ed, who is in Germany now, been through France, Luxembourg, Belgium, and now Germany, saying he was paid in German money. That struck me rather strange. I’d think they wouldn’t want our troops to mix with German people. But I guess they are limited though. I know there are several from down around home over here, so I’m keeping my eyes open wide. Met two Illinois boys, one from Salem and the other from Effingham, getting close. Maybe, if my luck holds out I’ll meet some one yet. I’d like to say hello to the boys over here and good luck to you all. They sure have done a wonderful job over here and it can’t last forever. I’ll have to sign off for now, and thanks a million for the paper. And be careful you don’t eat too much turkey during the holidays."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 27, 1945 – “Cpl. John E. JEZEK, son of Mr. and Mrs. Louie JEZEK, arrived home Dec. 22 after receiving his discharge at Camp Grant on Dec. 17.  He spent a few days in Chicago with his brothers before coming home.  John entered the service Dec. 9, 1942 and shipped overseas March 27, 1943, landing in Ora, Africa.  From there he went to France where he remained until his journey homeward.  He was with a Communication Division of the 7th Army.  He started home Nov. 24, and spent 18 days on the water, landing at Camp Patrick Henry, Va.  Cpl. John wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon, the Unit Citation, and the European Theater with 1 star, representing the campaign of the Rhineland.  As soon as John has rested, he intends going to school.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 3, 1946 –“A picture was printed of Cpl. John E. JEZEK, son of Mr. and Mrs. Louie JEZEK, who arrived home Dec. 22 after receiving his discharge on Dec. 17.  He serviced in the European Theater.”

 


 

John E. Jezek

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 19, 1951 – “With the 1st Cavalry Division, U.S. Army in Korea - (Delayed) Kinmundy, Ill. Army man in serving on the Korean front at a signal man in the 1st Cavalry’s 13th Signal Co.;  Private First Class John E. JEZEK, son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis JEZEK, son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis JEZEK, Kinmundy, is in the 1st Cavalry’s 13th Signal Co.  JEZEK’s unit completely installs and operates all Calvary communications equipment, including hundreds of miles of telephone lines and scores of high frequency radios and teletypewriters.” 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 28, 1952 – “Sgt. John E. JEZEK, son of Mr. and Mrs. Louie JEZEK, arrived home Monday from Korea. He has been overseas for 13 months. He will spend a 30 day furlough here with his parents and other relatives before reporting back to Fort Sheridan.”

 


 

Vernon H. Jezek

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 26, 1956 – “T. Sgt.  Vernon JEZEK arrived home Monday after serving a 2 year tour of duty in Japan.  After a 30 day furlough, he will report for duty at Bunker Hill, Ind.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 15, 1970 – “Senior Master Sgt. Vernon H. JEZEK was among the 687 members of their grade notified of their pending promotions to the rank of Chief Master Sgt.  Sgt. Jezek, a veteran of almost 22 years in the Air Force, is unscheduled maintenance NCOIC with the 4780th Organization Maint. Sq.  He came to Perrin AFB from an assignment at Phan Rang AB, Republic of Vietnam.  The Sgt. and his family live at 125 S. Imperial in Denison, Texas.  He is the son of Mrs. Bertha Jezek of Kinmundy.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 11, 1970 – “Senior Master Sergeant Vernon H. JEZEK, son of Mrs. Bertha A. Jezek of Kinmundy, is a member of the Perrin AFB, Tex. Unit that has been selected as the best aircraft maintenance organization in the U.S. Air Force.  Sgt. Jezek is an aircraft maintenance superintendent with the 4780th Air Defense Wing, winner of the 1969 Daedalian Maintenance Trophy.  Wing personnel were cited for outstanding performance in supporting aircraft, including F-102 Delta Dagger fighter interceptors, used in training ADC aircrews who help protect the United States against aerial attack.  The sergeant, a 1948 graduate of Kinmundy-Alma High School, has completed a tour of duty at Phan Rang AB, Vietnam.  His wife is the former Bobbie L. Baldwin.”

 


 

 

 

(V-268b) - Charles Johnson

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - March 23, 1944 -"Here’s a nice letter from Sgt. Charles JOHNSON, who has been very busy seeing the sights of Hawaii. He says: I have been here in the Hawaiian Islands for some time and have just now gotten around to dropping you a line. So please excuse my apology. It’s pretty nice here but it rains a lot. I guess several of the boys have been here before I so I expect you have heard all about it. I can’t write about our trip or what I’ve been doing here but I may write a very exciting book afer the war. I am tired of pineapples and cocoanuts already. I’ve seen several dear and wild hogs. Even as many as 12 in one herd in a small garage the other night. I was on guard the other night when a wild hog nearly ran over me. If he hadn’t been where I could see him we would of had pork. There is not much news and we cannot express our opinion about when the war will end but it can’t be too soon if it’s tomorrow. I would like to have the paper sent to my address. The news from home is first with us except letters from my wife. I believe I had better close and maybe in the near future I will be able to write more."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 13, 1945 – “Cpl. and Mrs. Charles JOHNSON arrived here Dec. 6th to visit their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank JOHNSON and family and their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. George LENHART.  Cpl. JOHNSON received his discharge Nov. 24 at Camp Grant.  Since that time, he has been visiting with his wife in Chicago.  Charles entered the service Feb. 20, 1943, and shipped overseas Feb. 11, 1944, landing in Hawaii, later going on to Iwa Jima, where he was stationed.  He started home Nov. 3, and landed near San Francisco, Nov. 17.  Cpl. JOHNSON wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon, the American Theater Ribbon, and the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with 2 stars, representing the campaigns of Iwa Jima and the Marriannas.  After he has concluded his visit with homefolks, he will return to Chicago where he will again take up his work with the Carnegie-Illinois Steel Co.”

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Dannie Johnson

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 22, 1957 – “Pvt. Dannie JOHNSON returned last Saturday to Ft. Chaffee, Ark. after a 14 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank JOHNSON.  He has completed 8 weeks basic training at Camp Polk, La., and will now be attending a clerking school at Ft. Chaffee.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 24, 1957 – “Pvt. Dannie F. JOHNSON, 21, whose wife, Ellen, and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank JOHNSON, live on Route 2, Alma, Ill., was graduated Oct. 11 from the eight week Administration School at Fort Chaffee, Ark.  He attended Kinmundy High School.”

  


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  George A. Johnson

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Aug. 26, 1943 - "Capt. George A. JOHNSON has again received a citation for exception and meritorious service during an engagement with the enemy from May 6 to May 9 in the vicinity of Mateur, Tunisia. When the initial attack was stopped by heavy anti-tank fire, he so capably organized his forces and prepared for the next day’s attack that he overran all enemy opposition and advanced well forward into the enemy’s strong defense lines. Mrs. JOHNSON, who is making her home here with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.D. INGRAM, informs us that her husband has been promoted to the rank of Major."

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - June 14, 1944 - "Our whole community received a shock Friday evening when the following telegram was received by Mrs. George JOHNSON: "The Secretary of the War desires me to express his deepest regret that your husband, Major George A. JOHNSON, was killed in action on the 25th day of May in Italy. Letter follows. The Adjutant General". Yes, we were all shocked immensely. This was Kinmundy’s first death in the war. How we have escaped thus far has been nothing more than a miracle. Every person in the community felt this shock and are sympathizing with the bereaved family for every family has some boy or girl participating in this war and they know not when they might receive a like message from the War or Navy Department. We claimed Major JOHNSON as one of our boys because he moved his family here just before he was called into service. And this has been his home ever since. Though, there are 2 other communities which can lay claim to him namely Harrisburg, where he was reared, and Windsor, where he taught school preceding his induction. Nevertheless, he was a good soldier and all these communities are mighty proud to claim him. George, the son of Mr. and Mrs. W.T. JOHNSON, was born in Saline Co. on March 21, 1912, and died at the age of 32 years, 2 months, and 1 day. He graduated from the Harrisburg High School with the class of ‘30, and graduated with honors from the University of Illinois with the class of ‘35. He taught a year in Vocational Agriculture at McNabb, Ill., and 5 terms at the schools in Windsor in a like position until he was called into service. On June 3, 1935 he married Miss Lucille INGRAM of this city, and they had 3 children: Jimmy 8, Nancy 6, and Joyce 4. While attending the U. of I. he enrolled in Reserve Officers Training and upon graduation was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army Reserves. In 1939 he was elevated to the Rank of First Lieutenant. He was called to duty on March 28, 1941, and left for overseas on May 10, 1942 landing in Ireland. From there, he was sent to Africa and then to Italy. He was advanced to Captain in Dec. 1942, and to Major in July 1943. He had been in the thick of the fighting in North Africa and then in Italy. While serving in the Tunisian Front he was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action. During the period of Jan. 21 to 24, 1943, he distinguished himself in action against an armed enemy, and led his company against the enemy contributed much to the success of the operation. On one occasion, the example he set was by firing at an enemy tank after he had to borrow ammunition from another vehicle gave his men the inspiration to carry the engagement to a successful conclusion. It was during this campaign that he received a citation for exceptional and meritorious service. In May 1943 he received a wound in the right hand from a shell fragment which sent him to a hospital for a week. On May 9, 1943, he received another citation and the following month received the Purple Heart. Major JOHNSON was rather fortunate in having a brother, 1st Lt. Joseph JOHNSON, in his regiment, and although they were several miles apart, they did manage to see one another quite often. Another brother, 1st Lt. Robert JOHNSON is with the Army Air Corps in New Guinea. Three brothers-in-law are also in the service, namely Lt. Col. William C. INGRAM, Army Air Corps, stationed in Idaho; Ray H. INGRAM, Ph 1 c, U.S.N., now stationed in Casa Blanca; and Louis C. INGRAM, Ph 2 c at the present time a patient in a hospital in Long Island. Besides the immediate family and the 2 brothers, he leaves his parents, who are living in Beltsville, Md., 2 brothers, Cressie at home, and Dan, also of Boltsville, and 1 sister, Verda, a nurse in the Garfield Hospital, Washington, D.C. Truly, this man was a soldier, giving his last full measure of devotion for his country. And we feel as though he did not die in vain. He was a good Christian man. Although, he retained his membership in the Ledford Baptist Church of Harrisburg, he was always more than willing to work along side of his faithful companion in any church or community in which he resided. Memorial Services will be held in Kinmundy High School June 25th."

 


 

Loren Johnson

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 9, 1945 – “Meadow Branch: Word has been received that Loren JOHNSON was inducted into the Army July 18, and is now stationed at Camp Hood, Texas, in the anti-tank division.  The last few years, Loren has worked in Salem, but was raised in the Meadow Branch vicinity and graduated from Kinmundy H.S.  He is the 34th boy to be taken into the service, who once attended our school.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 27, 1945 – “Meadow Branch: Mr. and Mrs. Frank JOHNSON, and Charles JOHNSON and wife spent last Wednesday with Mrs. Effis JOHNSON BUTTS, near Iuka.  Loren JOHNSON had been back on furlough and just returned to his station in Va., the 14th.  Mrs. BUTTS had all her boys home with her at the time.  Her daughters could not be present.” 

 


 

 

 

 

 

(V-315) Neil Johnson

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 14, 1946 –“Sgt. Neil JOHNSON arrived here Tuesday morning after receiving his discharge at Camp Fannin, Texas, the day previous.  He will visit here with his mother, Mrs. Paulene JOHNSON, until Saturday when he will leave for Chicago to be with his wife.  Neil entered the service Sept. 19, 1942 and was assigned to the Air Corps.  He received his basic at Seymour Johnson Field, S.C., and was stationed there for several months.  From there he went to Mitchell Field, N.Y., then to Luethenthal Field, N.C., then back to Mitchell Field, then to Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Md., then to Kelly Field, Texas, where he was stationed until sent to Camp Fannin, the separation center.  Sgt. JOHNSON and Cpl. Gloria MATTHEWS of Chicago were married at Mitchell Field, May 5, 1945.  Mrs. JOHNSON was discharged a few months ago and is now attending Beauty Culture School in Chicago.  Neil intends to attend school in the near future also.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 21, 1946 –“A picture was printed of S. Sgt. Neil JOHNSON, son of Mrs. Paulene JOHNSON, who arrived home Feb. 12 after receiving his discharge Feb. 11.  His wife met him here Thursday night.  The couple left Sunday for Chicago where they expect to make their home for awhile.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

      

Pauline Johnson

These pictures of her were taken in her uniform during WWI.  (Her son was, Neal Johnson, also of Kinmundy.)

 


 

V-315) Arthur Robert "Robbie" Johnson - 1984

 


       Harvey Johnston    

 (V-109) Harvey Johnston                                    (V-110) Harvey Johnston                      (V-6) Harvey Johnston photo and letter - WWII

 


"The Kinmundy Express" - June 29, 1944 - Woodrow Johnston

"Sgt. Woodrow JOHNSTON home on furlough after being wounded in Italian Invasion: Here’s a letter from Sgt. Woodrow JOHNSTON, of Meacham twp., in which he tells of being wounded in the invasion of Italy. He says: Just a few lines to show my appreciation for the old home town paper. You don’t have any idea how it helps to keep up the morale of the boys who are overseas. Well, Mr. VALLOW, I was in the invasion of Africa and Tunisia and the invasion of Sicily, where I didn’t duck quite soon enough. I was hit in the back with shrapnel and was flown back to Africa where I was operated to remove the shrapnel. I had a little trouble and a second operation was performed to remove my right kidney. It has affected me in a few different ways, but I believe I will soon be batting them off again. I landed in New York city on June 9th, and arrived here on my furlough of 25 days and boy, are they going fast. Then I report to a hospital for medical care. I was in the hospital for 7 months. The doctors and nurses are sure doing a wonderful job on the battlefields. I was in the 9th Division until I was wounded at Randazzo, Sicily. Those are the boys who are doing such a good job on the Normandy beach today. God Bless each and every one of them, and also all of my friends from home that are overseas in the battle zones. I was only over 20 months. My experience was as a Sgt. in the Infantry keeping the transportation moving. I will thank you again for the paper, and boys, I am done in this one, but keep up the good work. It is not going to be much longer."

 


 

(V-476) Amber Jones


 

Carl Jones - “The Kinmundy Express” – June 9, 1955 – “Leave for Military Training: Four local youths enlisted in the Armed Forces and left for training this week.  Bill BOYD and Larry SULLENS left Monday for Lackland Air Force Base at El Paso, Texas.  Jerry MORRIS and Carl JONES left Tuesday to enter boot training at Great Lakes-Lakes Naval Base.” 

 


 

Carl P. Jones

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 22, 1963 – “Airman Second Class Carl P. Jones of Kinmundy has arrived in Bentwaters RAF Station, England for assignment with a unit of the U.S. Air Forces in Europe.  Airman Jones, a weapons mechanic, formerly was stationed at Chambley AB, France.  The airman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Jones of Kinmundy is a graduate of Kinmundy-Alma High School.  His wife is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Boscoe E. Simpson of Rutland, Ill.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 27, 1970 – “U.S. Air Force Staff Sergeant Carl P. JONES, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Jones of Kinmundy, participated in the recent United States Air Forces in Europe munitions loading competition at Ramstein AB, Germany.  The sergeant is a 1961 graduate of Kinmundy-Alma High School.  He has completed a tour of duty in Vietnam.  His wife, Roberta, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Simpson of Rutland, Ill.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-328) Cecil F. Jones

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 23, 1945 – “Assembly Area Command, France - Among the “early American settlers” in this area are members of a general hospital unit which operated in France from March 1944 until June, when they were ordered to prepare for direct shipment to the Pacific.  Now stationed at Philadelphia, one of the 18 redeployment camps in the Assembly Area Command, near Reims France, the unit of which Cpl. Cecil F. JONES, R.R. 3, Kinmundy, Ill., is a member has seen the mammoth redeployment center arise from the dusty plains and wrecked buildings of what was once a French Army encampment.  Activated in Oct. 1944, at Camp Ellis, Ill., the unit reached France in Jan. 1945.  Early in March it proceeded to this area, where it was remodeled and repaired a schoolhouse before opening a 600 bed hospital.  Three months later, the unit was ordered to the Pacific via Camp Philadelphia.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 11, 1946 –“Tec. 4 Cecil JONES, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. Frank JONES, residing northwest of this city, arrived home after receiving his discharge at Camp McCoy, Wis. on April 2nd.  Cecil entered the service Jan. 28, 1943 and received his basic training at Camp McCoy, Wis.  He was then sent to Fort Custer, Mich., where he underwent basic again and assigned to the Military Police.  He was later transferred to the Medical Corps and shipped overseas, Jan. 18, 1945, landing in France.  Here he was stationed until October when he was sent to Germany.  He started homeward March 18, landing in New York March 28th.  He was with the Medical Corps of the 3rd Army.  He wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon, the American Theater Ribbon, and the European Ribbon.  After getting caught up on his visiting, he will return to his old position in Chicago.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Charles E. Jones

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Oct.  15, 1953 – “Pvt. Charles E. JONES, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom C. JONES, Kinmundy, has completed a 16-week training cycle at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo, with a unit of the 6th Armored Division. He received 8 weeks basic training in fundamentals of army life and the use of infantry weapons. He is now completing an additional 8 weeks engineer training. At the end of the training, he will either be sent to specialist school or as replacements to other units. He left Saturday for Camp Kilmer, N.J. after spending a 10 day furlough with his parents.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Apr. 21, 1955 – “Pfc. Charles JONES, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom JONES, arrived home Friday from Ft. Sheridan where he received a discharge from the Armed Forces.  He had completed 16 months service in Germany with the Army Engineers.” 

  


 

Charles L. Jones - “The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 20, 1962 - “Army Pvt. Charles L. JONES, whose wife, Barbara, and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Jones, live in Meacham twp., recently completed 8 weeks of military police training at The Provost Marshal General School, Fort Gordon, Ga.  Jones entered the Army in March 1962 and completed basic training at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo.  The 22 year old soldier attended North Clay High School in Louisville, Ill.”  (A photo was included with this article.)

 


 

Claude D. Jones

 “The Kinmundy Express” – May 16, 1968 – “The United States of America honors the memory of Claude D. JONES.  This certificate is awarded by a grateful nation in recognition of a devoted and selfless conservation to the service of our country in the Armed Forces of the United States.  Lyndon B. Johnson – President of the United States.”

 


(V-385) Darvin V. Jones

 


 

Donald W. Jones

 “The Kinmundy Express” – July 18, 1953 – “Mr. and Mrs. Lewis JONES of Arnold Chapel vicinity, received word that their son, Don, was expecting to leave Korea, heading for home, July 4th. Don has been in the service since Aug. 22, 1951, and has been in Korea a year May 2.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 27, 1953 – “Sgt. Donald W. JONES received his discharge from the army Thursday after spending the past 14 months in Korea. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis JONES, motored to Camp Breckenridge, Ky, and accompanied him home.”

 


 

Emmerson Jones

"The Kinmundy Express" - Sept. 7, 1944 - "Here’s one from Emmerson JONES, F2 c, who is sailing the seven seas aboard the U.S.S. Pennsylvania. He says: While I have a little time to myself, I thought it was about time I wrote and thanked you and the other folks for the paper. I have just begun receiving them and I sure enjoy reading the letters which the rest of the boys from home write, especially, the one which Charles JASPER had written from China, as Charles and I used to run around together quite a bit and that was the first I had heard from him since he left for the service. I have a very fine buddy with me by the name of Michael BERRA and every time I receive a paper we sit and read every thing that is in it. He is from St. Louis and he enjoys very much reading about the Municipal Opera. I would like to tell you about where I have been and what we have done since I left the good old States, but they are pretty strict on what we write. So that will just have to wait until I can get home and tell you in person. Well, Mr. VALLOW, there isn’t anything else I can think of to write this time so I will close thanking you once again for the paper."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 22, 1945 - “Emmerson JONES, F2 c, who has been sailing the seven seas on the USS Pennsylvania, arrived here Friday night to spend a 27 day leave with his wife and 2 children as well as his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom JONES and family.  This is his second leave home since entering the navy on Sept. 16, 1943, his first leave being in Nov. 1943 upon completion of his boot training.  And this is the first time he has seen his 13 month old daughter, Donna Louise.  He also has a 3 year old daughter, Linda Kay.  On Tuesday evening of this week, his wife prepared a birthday dinner for him and invited his parents and family to help Emmerson celebrate his birthday.  The table was adorned with a birthday cake on which rested 24 candles.  Emmerson wears several ribbons representing American Defense, Asiatic-Pacific Theater with 6 stars for the battles of Quajlein, Pelieu, Eniewetok, Guam, and Anguar, and the ribbon for the Philippine Campaign containing 2 stars for the battles of Luzon and Leyte.  After his leave has expired, he will report back to San Francisco.  Emmerson has one brother in the armed forces, Corporal Richard JONES, attached to the Air Corps in Texas.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 13, 1945 – “Emmerson JONES, Seaman 1st class, arrived here Saturday evening to greet his wife and children and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom JONES and family.  He received his discharge at Great Lakes that day and road the Panama Limited to Centralia because he said, he wanted to travel in style for once in his life.  Emmerson entered the service Sept. 5, 1943, and received his boot training at Farragut, Idaho  He was assigned to and went aboard the USS Pennsylvania Jan. 5, 1944.  Since then, he spent most of his time in the Southwest Pacific.  His ship returned to the states last March and he was granted a 27 day leave with home folks.  After re-boarding his ship, he again sailed to the Southwest Pacific, where he remained until coming home.  EMMERSON wears the Victory Ribbon, the American Theater Ribbon, the Navy Unit Accommodation Ribbon, the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with 5 stars, representing the campaigns of the Marshall Islands, Guam, Saipan, Pelieu, and a Surface Engagement and the Philippine Liberation Ribbon with 2 stars, representing the campaigns of Luzon and Leyte.  Mr. and Mrs. JONES have 2 children, Linda Kay, 4, and Donna Louise, 2.”

 


 

Carl P. Jones

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 23, 1970 – “U.S. Air Force Staff Sergeant Carl P. JONES, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Jones, of R.R. W Kinmundy, participated in the recent U.S. Air Forces in Europe munitions loading competition at Ramstein AB, Germany.  Sgt. JONES was a weapons mechanic with the team representing the 348th Munitions Maintenance Squadron at Lakenheath RAF Station, England.  His unit is a part of USAFE, America's air arm assigned to NATO.  The sergeant is a 1961 graduate of Kinmundy-Alma High School.  He has completed a tour of duty in Vietnam.  His wife, Roberta, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Sim

 


(V-395) Floyd Jones in Japan - Jan 1946

 

(V-399) M. Sgt Pleasant H. "Bud" Robnett and T3 Darrell Floyd Jones - May 5, 1946 - Imperial Palace Grounds Tokyo

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 20, 1945 – “Here’s a nice letter from T4 Floyd JONES, written Dec. 5, in Japan.  It is the first letter we have received from this country.  He says: Guess it’s about time I dropped you a few lines.  I have been receiving your paper for a long time and never have written you.  Every time I change addresses I lose out on the paper for awhile.  Now I’m in Japan.  I really enjoy reading your paper and am glad to hear that some of the boys are getting out.  Bud ROBNETT is in Japan too, but he is on Hakkaido quite a distance from me and I am afraid I won’t see him over here unless we moved closer together but I did see someone from Kinmundy in Manila, just before I left.  It was Jewell LUTTERAL.  We sure were surprised to see each other!  I am stationed just a few miles out of Yokahoma and about 20 miles from Tokyo.  Have a pretty good set-up here; live in barracks, have lights, running water, stoves and hot showers fixed up, so it’s pretty comfortable.  I would certainly hate to live in a tent here; it’s a little cool.  Had our first big frost and a little ice this morning, but part of the time it is just cold and rainy.  Don’t know if we will have a White Christmas or not.  I like the weather here much better than I did in Manila tho, I don’t like hot weather at all.  We have our motor pool in an airplane factory and hangar, we just took bull-dozers and pushed the planes, parts and tools out into a big pile.  These Japs had some very very good tools to work with, and others weren’t so good.  That building sure is a big one; there are many others just as big along the Bay here.  Some of them have been hit by bombers and a lot of them are untouched.  The Japs are better fixed for transportation than the Filippinoes.  Electric trains and street cars run all over this place.  The Japs have quite a few cars; also, use a lot of three-wheeled motorcycles with a small bed on the back.  They use them as a light truck.  They even pull trailers behind bicycles and they work one horse to a small wagon, hauling wood, furniture, etc.  Of course, there aren’t any water buffalo here, but I’ve seen ordinary cows pulling loads.  The Japs carry loads and even babies strapped to their back, while the Filippinoes carried loads on their heads.  The most confusing thing I’ve run into was driving on the left side of the road, was mighty awkward at first, but I guess the Americans are fast to catch on to something like that.  I haven’t seen a wreck yet, caused by some one driving on the wrong side of the road.  I went into Tokyo yesterday on the train.  The trains stop right by the barracks so it’s pretty handy.  We can ride any train for nothing - cheap enough, but you almost earn your ride before you get there.  I wouldn’t have believed it was possible to put so many people on one train, if I hadn’t seen it myself.  Tokyo is a large place alright.  I know I didn’t see but a small part of it yesterday.  There are some beautiful buildings there, looking at some parts of Tokyo you wouldn’t know but what it was some city in the states.  I saw the building in which Gen. MACARTHUR lives and went to the main entrance of the Imperial Palace, but of course, we couldn’t get into the grounds.  There’s some beautiful scenery around there - large gravel drives and huge parks filled with trees and shrubs.  I haven’t told you about the other parts of Tokyo and Yokahoma, though, they have been completely flattened by bombing.  We certainly did some precision bombing for one block may be blown up and the next block hasn’t been touched hardly.  The Japs have cleaned most of the ruins up and planted some of the ground to garden.  I haven’t seen any large fields, it’s all just little patches, but about all they grow around here is vegetables, anyway.  They have even dug places out in the hills, made them into small flat places and cultivate that; it is something like terracing.  Well, I’m going to have to close for now.  Say, don’t kill all the quail this year!  Maybe I will get a chance at them next season.  Here’s a Merry Christmas to all.”

 

(V-427) Floyd Jones, Emmett Garrett & _______________

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-270b) Harold B. Jones

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 29, 1945 – “PFC Harold B. JONES, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank JONES, residing northwest of this city and a member of the famous 33rd Division, arrived home Tuesday afternoon after receiving his discharge at Jefferson Barracks the same day.  Harold entered the service April 16, 1941, but on account of age was released on Nov. 10, 1941.  He was recalled to active duty Feb. 11, 1942 and shipped overseas June 16, 1943, landing in Hawaii.  From there he went to New Guinea, then to Morotai, Luzon and finally to Japan.  He started home Oct. 30, landing in Portland, Nov. 11th.  PFC JONES wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon, the Philippine Liberation Ribbon, the American Defense Ribbon and the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon with 2 stars, representing the campaigns of New Guinea and Luzon.  As to his future, Harold says he had that planned at the time he went into the service.  He will just take up farming where he left off.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


(V-397) Harold W. Jones

 

(V-286) Harold W. Jones in Hiro, Japan - 1945

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 25, 1945 – “According to word received here by relatives, Harold W. JONES is now a PFC.  He is serving with the 41st Division in the Philippines.  The 41st made the initial landing on Mindanao the first of March.  Harold has received the Expert Combat Infantry Badge and his regiment has been cited by the President, so he is now entitled to wear the Presidential Citation Medal.”

 


 

(V-374) J. Carl Jones

 


 

(V-114) James E. Jones

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-271b) Leon Jones

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 8, 1945 – “PFC Leon JONES, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar JONES, arrived home on Oct. 29th after receiving his discharge according to the Aviation Cadet discharge system at the Armarilla, Texas, Army Air Field.  Leon enlisted in the Aviation Cadet Corps in 1943 while still in high school.  He was called into service June 10, 1944, and since that time has been studying Airplane Mechanics at the Amarilla Army Air Field.  We are glad to welcome Leon home again.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Miburn Jones

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois – March 27, 1919

 Niece, France – Feb. 18, 1919

Dear Mother,

           I received your welcome letters alright and am glad to hear from you.  I am writing to let you know that I am still in France, am O.K. and having a good time.  I am at Niece, a big city on the Mediterranean Sea coast.  I am sitting in a Y.M.C.A. building that is built out over the sea writing this letter.  I have a 17 day furlough and am going to see all I can down here, this place being called the garden spot of France.  It is where the oranges grow.  I am visiting Neice, Monte Carlo and Monaco, the prettiest cities in the world, have been up in Italy too.  This is a grand place and only wish I could be here all the time while in France, for I do not have it so good when I get back to camp.  We leave here the 19th for Camp Eve, near Dejoin, it isn’t very far from Verdun.  I have been through some of the oldest buildings and castles in the world, Napoleon and Caesar’s castles; some of them are 1800 years old. And the castles where they beheaded people in olden times, if they did not have a certain belief.

           I do not know when I will get to come home but it some time this summer but not soon as I thought.  Do not worry about me for I am in the best of health and am wearing one gold service stripe and will be wearing two before I get home.  But we will be there sometime if they don’t start up another war and I hope not for we have had enough war.  It does not mean health for men and animals that the U.S. boys mustered into service and we showed the French how to muster the Germans out of the country.  We fed them Mustard Gas, Edison Gas, Machine Gun bullets and Shrapnel.  We mustered them back into Germany where they belonged.  We did not have to go up the Rhine River in Germany for when we got through fighting we were relieved and came back for rest.  We had been there for 2½ months fighting and got to rest until the Armistice was signed.  I hope I never have to go over those bloody battlefields again.  Keep on writing till I come home.

      Your loving son,   Milburn Jones - Co. F., 303 Ammunition Train, American E.F.

 


Murray Jones

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – Feb. 27, 1918;

 

Feb. 20, 1918

 Mrs. Jas. T. BROWN and all;

            Received your letter and was sure glad to hear from you and glad to know that some one thinks of the soldiers, for this is an unhappy life for a married man. I got the card and the box Monday and I thank you all very much for the presents.  Tell Jim we are on the rifle range now, guess we will finish this week, as we have had 12 days of it.  It has been summer here for about two weeks.  You asked me if I got the paper from up there.  I don’t get any appears at all.  I saw Sammy LOWE the other night.  He is in another company but I see him every once in a while.  How is everybody back in Kinmundy?  I sure would like to get back with my family, but perhaps it won’t be long.  I will close now again thanking you all for the box and hoping the war will soon be over and we can all come home.

 

Respectfully yours,  Murray JONES - Supply Co.  346 Inf., Camp Pike, Ark.

 


 

 

(V-480) Nick Jones

 


 

Richard Jones

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 13, 1945 – “Cpl. Richard JONES, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom JONES arrived home Dec. 11, after receiving his discharge at Chanute Field the same day.  Richard entered the service, Nov. 3, 1942, and was assigned to the Air Corps as a ground mechanic, but was later transferred to the Cadet Training Corps., in which he was being trained as a pilot.  He was stationed at San Marcos, Texas.  Cpl. JONES wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon, and the American Theater Ribbon.  As to his future, Richard says he would like to work a short time and then go on to school.”

 


 

(V-428) Sam Jones (Brother of Lewis, Carl, and Edgar Jones. He was with the American Red Cross)

 


 

Wayne Jones

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 7, 1945 – “Mrs. Wayne JONES, who is making her home with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde PRUETT, has received word from her husband stating that he has been promoted to the rank of Major.  He is in the Air Force and has supervision of several radio schools in all parts of the United States.”

 


 

Charles Kagy

AThe Marion County Express@; Kinmundy, Illinois; Jan. 2, 1919 - Chas. KAGY, son of Mrs. Idella KAGY of Meacham twp., arrived home last Friday night from Camp Grant, having been honorably discharged from the service.  He had received his overseas equipment when the armistice was signed.

 


(V-405) Earl Keen

 


 

(V-66) George Keen

 


 

Lavern Keen

“The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 21, 1946 –“Cpl. Lavern KEEN, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene KEEN, arrived home 2 weeks ago and is now at home with his wife, in the home of her mother, Mrs. W.B. VALLOW.  Lavern entered the service Feb. 5, 1943, and took his basic training at Camp McCoy, Wis.  He was then assigned to the Military Police and sent to Camp River Rouge, Detroit, Mich.  From there he went to Fort Custer, Mich, and then to Camp Van Dorn, Miss.  He was then transferred to the paratroopers and sent to Fort Benning, Ga.  He was next sent to the staging center at Ft. Meade, Md.  Here he failed to pass his oversea’s examination and was sent to Camp Howzie, Texas, where he became an instructor in the infantry.  He held the same position at Camp Hood, Texas.  He was next sent to Fort Lawson, Wash., and then to Ft. Lewis, Wash., where he received his discharge on Feb. 2nd.  Cpl. KEEN wears the Good Conduct Medal, the American Theater Ribbon and the Victory Ribbon.  On Jan. 2, 1945, Cpl. KEEN and Miss Jean VALLOW, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.B. VALLOW, were married in St. Louis.  This young couple expect to make their home in St. Louis where Mr. KEEN expects to be employed.”

 


 

James L. Kerley

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 22, 1952 – “Pvt. James L. KERLEY, son of Mr. and Mrs. Teddy R. KERLEY, Rt. 1, Alma, recently graduated from the Far East Command Chemical school at Camp Gifo, Japan. Before his arraignment, KERLEY was stationed at Camp Breckenridge, Ky. He formerly attended Kinmundy H.S.”

  

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 19, 1952 – “Pvt. James L. KERLEY, Rt. 1, Alma, is serving with the 2nd Infantry Division in Korea. The division was one of the first to fight in Korea and gained fame last fall by it’s conquest of "Heartbreak" and "Bloody" ridges. Pvt. KERLEY is a member of Company I, 39th Infantry Regiment, entered the Army last October. He formerly attended Vienna and Kinmundy Schools.”

 

  “The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 16, 1952 – “Pfc James KERLEY received the Combat Infantry Badge for excellent performance of duty under enemy fire in Korea recently. He is son of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore KERLEY of Alma. He entered the army in Oct. 1951 and is with the 2nd Infantry Division.”

 

 


(V-380) Robert E. Kessler


 

James Klein -  “The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 14, 1969 – “Army Private First Class James KLEIN, who parents Mr. and Mrs. William C. Klein, living in Kinmundy, was assigned July 21st to the 1st Signal Brigade in Vietnam, as a pole lineman.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Harold W. Kleiss

 

(V-272e) Harold W. Kleiss

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Nov. 16, 1944 - "Here’s one from Cpl. Harold KLEISS, who has just landed in England. From the way he writes, he forgot to take any lemons with him. He says: I guess you are beginning to think that I have forgotten all of you. Well, I haven’t. I’ve been rather busy and on the go so much since my furlough, that I haven’t hardly had time to write to the folks. As I guess you know by now, I am somewhere in England. I had a very nice trip across, as I was only seasick one time and that happened to be the very first night of the voyage. I considered myself rather lucky as I had only to look around me and see them "heaving it up" on the deck and over the rail. We are now at our new "home". As to how long we stay here is anybody’s guess. We are quartered in buildings and sleep on a mattress cover filled with wheat straw. That is about all I’m allowed to tell, so will sign off and hit the "straw"."

 

(V-334) "This is the first grave of Sergeant Kleiss in the Henri Chappele Cemetery in Belgium.

Photo by Capt. Leo E. Donovan of Springfield, who made a special effort to visit the grave.

 

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Jan. 15, 1948 - "The Sergeant Comes Home: Sergeant Harold W. KLEISS, Battery A, 307th Field Artillery Battalion, 78th Lightning Division, returned home Saturday morning, Jan. 10, 1948, after an absence of three years, three months.  But it was God’s will that he return home in a baggage car in a flag draped casket.  His journey was a long one but he was at home now, among his loved ones and friends.  As C. & E.I. Train number 123 pulled to a stop at the station, the baggageman gently slid the door open, exposing the flag draped box.  This brought tears to the eyes of many of the near 100 relatives, friends, and comrades, who had gathered at the early hour to accord him the utmost respect.  The trainmen very gently unloaded his casketed remains from the baggage car to an awaiting truck.  As the train pulled out, every train employee looked from a door and bowed their heads in respect.  Of course, they did not realize it, but no doubt but what this lad had waved at them while he was riding a gang plow or a corn cultivator as they passed by Sunnyslope Farm.  Sergeant Harold was just like any other farm lad, he always waved at the train crews as they sped by.  After the train had pulled out, an order was given by an officer in charge and six pallbearers stepped forward, lifted the casket from the truck and placed it in the hearse.  The hearse moved slowly toward the home of the parents.  The casket was removed and placed on a bier, and taken into the home.  The boys in olive drab and blue then proceeded the public square where they raised a flag, and then lowered it to half-mast.  This flag floated at half-mast for three days in honor of Sergeant KLEISS.  Sergeant KLEISS lay in state in his home with a burning candle at either end of his flag draped casket, a kneeling bench in front for those who care to offer a prayer for the repose of the soul.  At either end of the casket also stood the colors of the American Legion.  In the background was a large profuse of the prettiest flowers one could ever wish to see.  In reality, this wasn’t his home when he left.  But it was the home of his grandmother.  So it was just as near and dear to him as Sunnyslope Farm.  You see, Harold was a typical farm lad and did a great deal of the farm work.  But after he was called to the colors, the father, mother, and two sisters, kept right on, trying to do their best to keep everything going until he returned.  But in the last summer of 1944, the father contracted undulant fever which rendered him helpless as far as farm work was concerned.  This threw all the work on the two sisters.  They did not mind it in the least.  Their only thought was just to hold things together until Harold returned.  But after receiving that sad message from the War Department, they realized they could not carry on the farm work.  So they had a sale and moved to town to this house which the parents had purchased after the death of the grandmother.  Several days ago after word reached here that Sergeant KLEISS would return home, inasmuch as the church of his father was rather small and certainly could not accommodate the relatives and friends, it was proposed to the family that the funeral services be held in the school gymnasium.  The family consented.  The matter was taken up with the pastor.  He was favorable but had to have the consent of his superiors.  This consent was readily obtained.  In the meantime, the gymnasium caught fire and considerable damage was done to the interior.  But workmen worked like fury to get these necessary repairs done for the funeral.  Less the 24 hours before the funeral hours,  These workmen laid aside their tools, having completed their work enough to make the place look respectable.  At 9:45 o’clock, the remains left the home escorted by members of the American Legion, the family and friends.  The funeral cortege arrived at the gymnasium at 10 o’clock. The procession was met outside the door by the Rev. R. A.B. SCHOMAKER, pastor of St. Philomena’s Church.  After the usual short ceremony he led the procession into the gymnasium and immediately ascended to the improvised altar on the stage where he offered mass.  Although this was an improvised altar, we can truthfully say it looked beautiful.  Fr. SCHOMAKER was assisted at the altar by two lads in their army uniforms, namely, Charles VALLOW and Alva STOCK.  These two lads responded to the request of the family to be Mass Servers.  Harold had worked with them in that capacity on several occasions.  Although it had been serval years since they had done this, they just couldn’t have done better.  Their rhythm was perfect.  During the mass, three songs were sung by Mrs. W.B. VALLOW and Mrs. J.N. VALLOW, namely “Jesus Savior of My Soul”, “Take Me, My Jesus, To Heaven”, and “Face to Face”.  They were accompanied at the organ by Mrs. Paulene JOHNSON.  The gymnasium was filled almost to capacity with relatives and friends.  There was a little standing room left.  All business houses were closed, the school was closed, and people came from neighboring towns.  Most everyone present knew Harold or his family. It was heart rendering to glance over at the audience and see the tear bedecked eyes of several Goldstar mothers and fathers.  We well knew just what they were thinking. The gymnasium is so massive, those in the rear could not hear the mass being said.  The public address system was set up by Earl DOOLEN, over which Fr. SCHOMAKER delivered his sermon.  He did not dwell much on the life of Harold because, as he said, he was such a good boy there just couldn’t be enough good things said about him.  He well knew that this was the first Catholic Funeral several of his listeners had ever attended.  And so he explained at length, the ritual of the church, telling just why this and that was done.  His talk was very enlightening.  The procession left the gymnasium and the cortege wended it’s way to Evergreen Cemetery. The colors and firing squad preceding the hearse, the pallbearers and honorary pallbearers walking on either side of the hearse and other members of the American Legion walking behind the hearse.  At the grave, the regular ritualistic services were read by Fr. SCHOMAKER after which the firing squad fired three volleys.  Taps was sounded by Dwayne HANNA.  The flag was lifted from the casket by two of the pallbearers and presented to Sgt. Steve MITTL, who had escorted the body from Chicago.  Sgt. MITTL then, on behalf of the United States, presented it to the mother.  The casket was then lowered to its final resting place.  Harold William, son of Fred W. and Dora STOCK KLEISS, was born Aug. 17, 1917, on Sunnyslope Farm south of Kinmundy.  He attended Wilson School and was graduated from High School with the class of ‘35.  After his graduation, he engaged in farming and was a very successful young farmer.  He was inducted into the army on July 7, 1942, and spent the most of this army life at various camps in the States, becoming an instructor in his branch of service.  He applied for overseas duty against the wishes of his superior officers and sailed Oct. 14, 1944.  Soon after his landing, he was thrown into combat service, making his way up through France, Holland, Luxembourg, Belgium, and into Germany.  On Dec. 16, Nazi General Gerd VON RUNSTEDT commenced the Battle of the Bulge.   Two days later, Sergeant KLEISS was sent with a detail to an observation post.  They set up headquarters in a two story building.  The Jerries soon located the building and their aim was perfect.  A shrapnel came down through the roof of the building, on down thru the second story and exploded when it reached the first story Sergeant KLEISS happened to be on this floor. A fragment and this shrapnel struck him in the head, rendering him unconscious.  The medics were soon on hand and transported him to a base hospital.  His wound was serious.  The doctors and nurses did everything within their power.  The Catholic Chaplain offered prayers.   But his life ebbed away the following day.  And he was buried in the Henri Chapelle Cemetery in Belgium.  His cross was one of the 17,320 in this cemetery.  This happened just a week before Christmas.  Always before, he had been lucky enough to spend Christmas with homefolks.  But this Christmas homefolks knew it was impossible.  This Christmas happened to be a bleak cold day in this vicinity.  The father arose early to start the fires.  Mother lay in bed.  Both thought of their son.  Father shed a few tears because he knew Harold wanted to be at home and couldn’t Mother shed a few tears wondering if Harold was warm and had plenty to eat.   Neither knew the other was crying their hearts out for their son.  Within a few days, that expected letter did not come.  Nor did it come the next day nor the next.  Then they were just sure something had happened.  Finally on Jan. 8, 1945, the family received the expected telegram stating Harold had been seriously wounded.  It was certainly a hard task to break this  news to this good family.  But it was still harder on Jan. 15th, just a week later, to deliver to them the telegram announcing his death.  Memorial services were held the following Monday morning.  This did a lot toward consoling the members of the immediate family.  And yet, there was that thought that maybe the War Dept. might, be mistaken and Harold would show up later.  This memorial was just as trying on them as a funeral.  And yet, they realized the hard part was to come.   That was when the other boys returned home after the war.  Of course, they were glad to see all these boys come home again. They were broad-minded.  Yet, that loneliness or longing for their son was evidenced on several occasions.  Many a tear was shed which no one knew about.  Three years has now elapsed since his death.  Time has partially healed Those of us who knew the Sergeant KLEISS, having nothing but the fondest memories of him.  He did no deed which would cause us to have any other kind.  He was certainly a good lad, we would say one of the best.  We know that everyone of us will cherish his memory in our hearts.  Yes, Sergeant KLEISS is now resting beside loved ones, and we know it is a great relief to the father, mother and two sisters to know that he is there.  Some time ago the family had a large stone placed upon the lot in his memory.  They frequently visited this place and placed flowers in front of the stone.  This was satisfying to some extent, and yet, there was a vacancy that existed.  But now it is different, he is there.  Sergeant KLEISS was the first war dead to be returned to Kinmundy.  And the citizens of this community did their utmost toward showing respect to this honored boy as well as extending every courtesy possible to the immediate family.  And it is our intention to pay the same respect for all the lads who are returning to us."

 

(V-330) "Sergeant Harold W. Kleiss, ASN 36062574, Battery A, 307th Field Artillery Battalion, 78th Lightning Division,

arrives in Kinmundy, his old home town.  Train was met by relatives and friends."

 

 

(V-331) Harold W. Kleiss - "The flag draped casket is carried into the home by friends and comrades. 

Left: Earl Doolen, Charles Kline, Dale Wright.  Right: John McCulley, Charles Diss, Ralph Jenkins."

 

 

(V-332) Harold W. Kleiss -  "Funeral services are held in the school gymnasium before an improvised altar. 

The Rev. Fr. Schomaker is delivering his sermon to friends of Sergeant Kleiss."

 

 

(V-333) Harold W. Kleiss - "The flag draped casket sets above it's final resting place in Evergreen Cemetery. 

The flag was removed and the casket lowered.  Note the beautiful memorial stone."

 

Harold W. Kleiss

 


 

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - June 22, 1944 - "Word has been received by relatives here from Charles KLINE and Dale WRIGHT, both in England, that they spent June 6th together. We are happy our boys can meet in other countries."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 26, 1945 – “Mr. and Mrs. Chester KLINE have received word from their son, Charles, stating that he has been promoted to Master Sergeant.  Charles is still on the Western Front.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 25, 1945 – “Sgt. Charles KLINE arrived here Saturday evening to spend a 10 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chester KLINE and family.  After the expiration of his furlough he will report back to Ft. Sheridan where he will receive his discharge.  Charles entered the service Feb. 3, 1942, and shipped overseas on Dec. 29, 1943, landing in England.  From there he went to France, then to Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, and Czechoslovakia.  He started back to the states on Oct. 7th and landed in Boston October 15th.  He was with the 4th Armored Division 37th Tank Battalion.  Sgt. KLINE wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Bronze Star Medal, Presidential Citation and the European Theater of Operations Ribbon with 5 stars, representing the battles of Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Central Europe, and Ardennes.  We are all very happy to see Charles at home again and we know he is mighty glad to be back.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 25, 1945 – “Wilson School: M. Sgt. Charles KLINE came home last Saturday on a 10 day furlough.  He has just returned after almost 2 years in the European Theater of War.”

 

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 15, 1945 – “Wilson School: M. Sgt. Chas. KLINE is now at home and has received his discharge from the army.  “Welcome Home, Charles.”

 

 

 

 

 

(V-82) Charles B. Kline

 


 

(V-429 & V-430) Chester Kline  (WWI)

“The Marion County Express”; Kinmundy, Illinois – March 13, 1919

            Chester KLINE, son of Mr. and Mrs. Cal KLINE residing southwest of this city, arrived home early Tuesday morning from Camp Grant where he had been sent upon his arrival from France, for demobilization.   He left Kinmundy in February, 1918 and was sent to Camp Taylor where he trained for some time.  In September of that same year, he sailed with the 84th Division, with quite a number of Kinmundy boys.  Soon after his arrival in France, he was transferred to another division and started toward the front but failed to get into the action before the signing of the armistice.  His many friends here are indeed glad to welcome him home and extend him the greetings due one of “Pershing’s Crusaders.”

 


 

Clark E. Kline

 

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – March 14, 1918;

Great Lakes, Ill.; Feb. 23, 1918

To the Red Cross Society; Kinmundy, Ill.

I have just received the box from mother containing the sacks donated by your society and wish to take this opportunity to express my appreciation and thanks for them.

We will no doubt have considerable cold weather up here yet this winter, although right now it is quite warm and springlike.  I am sure I will have much need of the socks as we will be out of doors a great deal from now on.  I will write just a line about myself since coming to this station.  I enlisted at Omaha on November 28th and reported here December 9th, and was at once placed in the detention camp, which is the home of all recruits for the first twenty-one days after their entrance.  Those 21 days seemed like as many weeks to us but the last one finally rolled around and we all felt free as birds but our freedom did not last long as three days later we were placed under quarantine and from then on until about two weeks ago we were free for about ten days, so you see we have been greatly handicapped.  In spite of all we have done pretty well having finished our period of drilling and instructions in general seamanship preparatory to entering the Radio school which by the way is the branch in which  by the way is the branch in which I enlisted.

The station has been pretty crowded and especially the schools so we have been held back on that account, but they are getting them thinned out now and I think we will soon be going ahead unhindered I will no doubt have more to tell then and a better opportunity to write so will close now with best regards to you and all the old friends in Kinmundy. 

 

Sincerely,  Clark E. KLINE; Co. L  rst Reg. Camp Dewey; Great Lakes, Ill.


 

(V-274) Francis Kolb


 

Clark Krutsinger - “The Kinmundy Express” – March 13, 1952 – “Pfc. Clark KRUTSINGER visited Mr. and Mrs. Ivan DEVORE Sunday evening, he is on leaving before going to Alaska.”

 


 

(V-380) Harlas Dean Krutsinger

 


 

Ralph Krutsinger

“The Kinmundy Express” – June 7, 1951 – “Miletus: PFC Ralph KRUTSINGER spent last week with homefolks.  His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ira KRUTSINGER, Francis, and Jr. BUTTS accompanied him to Evansville, Ind. Monday enroute to Camp Rucker, Ala.”

 

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 8, 1951 – “Miletus: PFC Ralph KRUTSINGER and PFC Charles N. MONICAL, who have been stationed at Camp Rucker, Ala. for the past year, were transferred to Camp Kilmer, N.J. enroute to Germany.  They were given a 2 week pass and the two went to Ft. Belvour, Va. to see Ralph’s brother, Pvt. Clark L. KRUTSINGER.  They walked into his barracks at 10:30 Saturday night and spent the night until 2:30 Sunday.  Clark was given an evening pass and all went to Hyattsville, Md. to visit with Mrs. Clark KRUTSINGER, who is at present residing with her cousin, Mrs. Leonard HEICHER and family.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Kenneth Lacey

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 21, 1958 – “Major Kenneth LACEY killed in plane crash Wednesday: An Air Force Major, Kenneth P. LACEY, of Kinmundy, was among 10 U.S. servicemen killed Wednesday in the crash of a four engine serial tanker near St. Vith, Belgium.  The plan was on a routine flight from Germany to it’s home base at Sculthorpe, Norfolk, England.  He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Milton LACEY who live on farm in Meacham twp. about 6 miles east of Kinmundy.  Major LACEY, 37, entered the service in 1942.  He had been stationed at Sculthorpe, R.A.F. Base near Norfolk, England, since March 1957.  Born in Meacham twp., he graduated from Farina H.S. in 1939.  On July 2, 1943, he married Betty Jane MAHON, Vandalia.  Mrs. LACEY and her two children, Candyce Lynn, 11, and Johnnie Keith, 8, are living at the base in England.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 4, 1958 – “Funeral services for Major Kenneth LACEY will be held in the Farina Gymnasium Friday and interment will be made in Elder Cemetery.  He was stationed at Sculthorpe R.A.F Base, Norfolk, England, and was one of 10 on an KB50 Ariel tanker which crashed at St. Vith, Belgium, Aug. 13.  All men were killed.  Mrs. LACEY and her 2 children, who were living at the base, arrived in Farina last week.  The children are attending school and making their home with Mr. and Mrs. Hugh LACEY.  They intend to make Farina their home for the present.”

 


 

Robert L. Lacey - “The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 16, 1967 – “Doctor (First Lieutenant) Robert L. LACEY, son of Mr. and Mrs. Morris E. Lacey of Kinmundy, has completed the orientation course for officers of the U.S. Air Force Medical Service at Sheppard AFB, Texas.  The doctor was given instruction in specialized aerospace medical subjects and administrative procedures of the USAF Medical Service.  He is being assigned to Kadena AFB, Okinawa, to practice as a veterinarian with the Pacific Air Forces, America’s overseas air arm in Southeast Asia, the Far East and the Pacific.  Dr. Lacey, a graduate of LaGrove High School in Farina, attended Southern Illinois Univ.  He received his B.S. and D.V.M. degrees from the Univ. of Ill.”

 


 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 21, 1952 – “Pvt. George A. LAMBIRD, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter LAMBIRD, Kinmundy, is nearing completion of a 16 week training cycle at Ft. Leonard Wood with a unit of the 6th Armored Division.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 1, 1953 – “The following letter was printed: "Seoul, Korea; Dec. 23, 1952; Dear Editor, I wish to thank the very thoughtful people who sent Christmas cards. It sure is good to know that people at home haven’t forgotten me completely, even if I am thousands of miles away. Thanks very much and keep the home fires burning, but not too high.

      Pvt. George A. LAMBIRD.

           P.S. I would like to subscribe for the paper. If it isn’t too much trouble." Thanks George, for this nice letter. Many who send these cards sometimes wonder if the boys get them O.K.”


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-401) Charles E. Lambert

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Harold Lambird

 

(V-339) Harold Lambird

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Apr. 6, 1944 - Meacham: PFC Harold LAMBIRD is at home on a furlough. He has been serving in the Southwest Pacific for the past 18 months.

 

March 29, 1945 - PFC Harold LAMBIRD, Son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter LAMBIRD, Dies of Wounds on Iwo Jima: As announced last week, Mr. and Mrs. Walter LAMBIRD of Meacham twp., received a message from the War Dept. stating their son, PFC Harold LAMBIRD, had died from wounds received in action in Iwo Jima, 9 March. He was in the Marine Corps. Again, our hearts go out to this good family and we extend sympathy in your loss of this noble lad. We know that he was a good boy and we know that he will be sadly missed, like many other lads, when the rest of our boys come marching home. Harold, son of Walter and Minnie MERRITT LAMBIRD, was born Dec. 13, 1921 in Warrenburg, Ill. When just a small lad, he moved with his parents to the present homestead in Meacham twp. Here he acquired his education in Booker School. After finishing school, he helped his father with his farm work for a while and then went to Champaign where he found employment in a foundry. He enlisted in the armed services July 31, 1942 and was sent to the Southwest Pacific Theater in Oct. of 1942. There he fought on Guada canal, Tarwawa, and other islands. In March 1944, he was sent home on a month’s furlough. After his furlough, he was sent to North Carolina, where he remained for 4 months. He was then shipped back to the Southwest Pacific Theater in time to help take Saipan. And died of wounds received in Iwo Jima March 9, 1945. Besides his parents, he leaves the following brothers and sisters: Carl LAMBIRD of Madison, Ill.; Leonard LAMBIRD of St. Peter; Geneva HAYS of Wichita, Kansas; Pauline and George at home. Also an aged grandmother, Mrs. Cora MERRITT of Champaign. Thus closes the life history of another lad who gave his full measure of devotion for his country. His memory will linger on.

 

 

 

"The casketed remains of Marine Corporal Harold Lambird leaving the family home, under military escort for the Methodist Church Sunday, where funeral services were held."

 

Apr. 15, 1948 - Last Funeral Rites Held Here Sunday for Marine Hero PFC Harold LAMBIRD: The casketed remains of Marine Cpl.  Harold LAMBIRD arrived here last Thursday night on I.C. Train No. 29, accompanied by Marine Cpl. CLARK.   They were taken to the home of the parents in this city where they remained until the funeral hour.  Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon from the Methodist Church Rev. Orlando BRAKEMEYER, officiating.  Interment was in Evergreen Cemetery with full military honors.  The flag on the public square, as well as those throughout the business district and in front of many homes throughout the city, floated at half-staff on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.  The church was filled almost to capacity and a large profuse of flowers symbolized the sympathy extended to the immediate family of this lad who laid down his life for his country.  Harold, son of Walter and Minnie MERRITT LAMBIRD, was born Dec. 13, 1921, at Warrensburg, Ill.  When just a small child, he moved with his parents to their home in Meacham Township.  Here he grew to manhood, attaining his education in the Booker School.  He helped his father with the farm work and then went to Champaign, Illinois, where he found employment in a factory.  Harold enlisted in the U.S. Marines on July 31, 1942.  In October 1942, he was sent to the Southwest Pacific Theater of Operations.  Here he saw much action on Guada Canal and Tarwawa.  In March 1944, he was returned to the states and granted a 30 day furlough, which was spent here with his parents.  After the expiration of his furlough, he was sent to North Carolina where he remained for four months.  He was then sent back to the Southwest Pacific.  His last assignment was in the ragged campaign of Iwo Jima.  Here his conduct reached a high point when he became No. 1 gunner of machine gun squad, taking the place of men who were casualties before him.  He remained at this post for several days under the heaviest of rifle, machine gun and mortar fire, doing a difficult job with never a complaint.  On March 6th, he was wounded by rifle fire and was evacuated to the Hospital ship, U.S.S. Samaritan.  The ship’s chaplain, Clarence F. CROUSER, in a letter to the bereaved family, written 3 days after Harold’s passing had this to say “Undoubtedly you were informed by our government of the death of your son, Harold, on this ship.  After his injury upon the field of battle, he was transferred to this Naval Hospital Ship for treatment.  Our doctors are among the best in the profession and they did everything possible to save his life.  Our nurses and corpsmen did much to make him comfortable during his last hours.  Human efforts failed and God called him to his eternal home at 11 a.m. on March 9th.  I was with him shortly before his death and offered a prayer.  Our prayers have been with him all during his suffering and with his dear ones at home, that they might be strengthened in the hours of affliction.  Cpl. LAMBIRD was laid to rest in the Marine Cemetery in Guam.  Besides his parents, he is survived by the following brothers and sisters: Carl LAMBIRD of East St. Louis; Leonard LAMBIRD of Vandalia; Mrs. Geneva HAYS of Kinmundy; Pauline and George at home; and an aged grandmother, Mrs. Cora MERRITT of Champaign; six nieces and four nephews.

 


 

Rock A. Landes

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 1973 – “Marine Pvt. Rock A. LANDES, of Rt. 1 Alma, graduated from basic training at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot at San Diego, May 23rd."

 


 

Carl B. Lane

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 27, 1954 – “Pvt. Carl B. LANE, 20, son of Mr. and Mrs. Cecil LANE, Kinmundy, is serving with the Army on Okinawa.  He is a member of Heavy Mortar Company in the 29th Regimental Combat Team.  He entered the Army in April 1953, and completed basic training at Ft. Riley, Kansas.” 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 5, 1955 – “Carl B. LANE, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Cecil H. LANE of Kinmundy, recently was promoted to Corporal while a member of the 75th Regimental Combat team on Okinawa.  He is a mechanic in Heavy Mortar Co. and entered the army in April 1953 and has been overseas 12 months.” 

 


 

Eugene Lane - “The Kinmundy Express” – Feb. 28, 1946 –“Pvt. Eugene LANE of Ft. Sheridan, Ill., spent the weekend with his folks, Mr. and Mrs. Earl LANE and family.”

 


 

(V-404) James Lane

"The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 24, 1953 – “Pvt. James LANE, arrived home Sunday from Korea. He will spend Christmas at home before reporting for a discharge.”

 


 

(V-165) Paul Richard "Dick" Lane

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-206) Robert Lane

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 9, 1946 –“Pvt. Robert E. LANE of Ft. McCellan, Ala. is spending a furlough here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Earl LANE.  At the end of his furlough, Pvt. LANE will report for duty at a camp in N.J.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

"The Kinmundy Express" - Nov. 9, 1944 - Everett Lansford

"Here’s one from PFC Everett LANSFORD, who is somewhere in Germany. He says: Here is some lines to let you know I am getting the paper. There is lots of news in it that is kinda old by the time it gets here, but you know it takes some time for mail to travel this far. There are some boys from around Salem, Alma and Kinmundy here that I know and I guess there are a lot more. I got a letter from Raymond MOELLER the other day. I sure wish I could run into him sometime. I have been here for some time you know, and I can’t say how long. It is a little rough here sometimes. I will say I am in Germany somewhere. I have sure seen lots since I have been here. I hope the war will soon end. It sure keeps a fellow busy ducking. It is not near so bad now as it was, and I know I’ve seen all I want to see right now. I was reading Lawrence BASSETT’s letter where he said he would like to see some snow. Well, it has been a long time since I saw snow, but I will probably get to see some later on, but I hope not. Well, I better stop for now. Thanks a lot for sending the paper and good luck to you all."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Aug. 9, 1945 – “With the 30th Infantry division in Assembly Area Command, France - PFC Charley S. NEAL of R.R. 4, Kinmundy, and PFC Everett D. LANSFORD, of Alma, enroute home from Europe with the “Old Hickory” Division which broke up Germany’s supreme counter-offense in Normandy, is now being processed at Camp Oklahoma City, an infantry deployment center operated by the Assembly Area Command.  Landing on the French coast on D plus 4, the 30th, commanded by Major General L. S. HOBBS, spearheaded the St. Lo breakthrough, poured across northern France, Belgium, and Holland, and then crashed through the Siegfried Line to complete the encirclement of Aachen.  On Dec. 17, 1944, the division wheeled south to help stop Runstedt’s lightning attack in the Ardennes.  After some bitter fighting in the Stavelot-Malmedy sector they sent the Germans reeling back frustrating Nazi plans to seize Belgium’s northern ports, stunned SS Panzer troops taken prisoner and gasping Nazi radio commentators spoke of having yielded to “Roosevelt’s SS” in this battle.  Out for the kill, the 30th led the 9th Army’s assault crossing of the Rhine on March 24 and fought it’s way more than 200 miles to the Elbe of Madgeburg where the Russians and Americans clasped hands in an historic meeting.  PFC NEAL is the son of Roy E. NEAL, R.R. 4, Kinmundy.  He holds the following decorations Good Conduct Ribbon, and ETO Ribbon with 5 stars.  PFC LANSFORD is the son of Myrtle LANSFORD, Alma, Ill.  He holds five battle participating stars.”

 


 

Earl Leat - “The Kinmundy Express” – June 28, 1945 – “Cpl. Earl LEAT, brother of Mrs. Reindl BAYLIS, has been awarded the Combat Infantry Badge for outstanding performance of duty with the 103rd Infantry Division in ground combat against the enemy.  He is serving with the 410th Regiment of the Cactus Division.”

 


 

Billy Lee - “The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 15, 1951 – “Mrs. Shirley LEE and daughter, Mrs. Shirley WATSON and son, Sgt. Billy LEE of Ludlow, visited with Mrs. Margaret GRAY, Mr. and Mrs. R.D. HANNA, Harvey HANNA and other relatives Monday.  Sgt. LEE had just returned from Korea.”

 


 

(V-275b)  Glen Lee with his mother Mrs. Stella Lee

 

"The Kinmundy Express" - July 8, 1943

"Ever since the sinking of the Transport McCawley in the battle of Rendova, Mrs. Stella LEE of this city has been somewhat worried because her son, Glen, was one of the crew on that ship. Although the release stated that there were no casualties, she just couldn’t help worrying. Then a later broadcast stated a few members of the crew were lost. Her mind was greatly relieved Tuesday when she relieved a call from Glen’s wife, who stated that she had wired and also telephoned Washington and they stated that Glen’s name was not on the casualty list. Glen has been in the Navy for 20 years and holds the rank of Chief Boatswain’s Mate. He is 39 years old."

 


 

John Lee

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 25, 1954 – “Mrs. John LEE of Breese and son, John, who is stationed with the Navy in New York, spent Sunday with Mrs. Stella LEE.” 

 


 

Robert E. Lee - “The Kinmundy Express” – March 1, 1956 – “Robert E. LEE of Breese was recently promoted to specialist third class in France where he is a member of the 7825th Army Unit of the U.S. Army Europe Communications Zone.  LEE, a clerk in the unit’s station complement detachment, entered the army in Aug. 1954 and completed his basic training at Camp Chaffee, Ark.  He arrived in Europe in Jan. 1955.  LEE, son of Mr. and Mrs. John C. LEE of Breese, Ill., graduated from Eastern Ill. State College in 1954.  He is the grandson of Mrs. Stella LEE of this city.”

 


 

William D. Lee

“The Kinmundy Express” – Nov. 24, 1966 – “M/Sgt. W.D. LEE has pulled his trailer to Paxton, Ill., where his family will reside while he has a tour of duty in Viet Nam.  He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Shirley Lee.  Mrs. Lee is the former Ruby Hanna.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Sept. 19, 1968 – “Sgt. William D. LEE Receives Bronze Star for Meritorious Service in Vietnam”: “Sgt. William D. LEE, son of Shirley and Ruby (Hanna) Lee of Ludlow, former Kinmundy residents, received a Bronze Star for distinguishing himself by exceptionally  meritorious service in connection with ground operations against a hostile force in Vietnam, while serving with the 9th Division of the U.S. Army during 1967.  Sgt. Lee retired Aug. 31, 1968, after serving 20 years, and is now residing in rural Paxton with his wife, Edna and family, consisting of two boys and a girl.  His service included tours in Japan, Korea, Honduras, Germany, and Vietnam.  He is now employed as control technician with Magnavox in Urbana.”

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-318) Clifton Lemay 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – March 14, 1946 –“Cpl. Clifton LEMAY, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred LEMAY, arrived home March 9 to be with his wife and daughter, after receiving his discharge at Camp Grant the day previous.  Cpl. LEMAY entered the services Jan. 18, 1944, and shipped overseas Sept. 20, 1944, landing in France.  From there he went to Belgium, Germany and Austria.  He sailed for home from Bremerhaven Feb. 15, landing in a New York Feb. 26.  Cpl. LEMAY wears the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon and the European Theater Ribbon with 2 stars representing the campaigns of the Rhineland and Central Germany.  As soon as he has caught up on his visiting, Clifton will return to his old job on the Signal Gang of the Illinois Central Railroad.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


William Lemay 

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – April 4, 1918;

 

Camp Logan, Houston, Texas; March 24, 1918;

Mrs. Mayme BROWN,

I will try and write you a few lines to let you know how us boys are getting along in Texas.  We like it fine down here and are in the best of health.  We went out on maneuvers Friday and pitched our tents just in time to get out of the rain.  Then when it stopped raining we went out patrolling and when we got about two miles from our camp it began raining again and before we could get back we were wet as could be.  When we got back to our pup tents the water was about a foot deep.  Then we tore down our tents and rolled our blankets and went back to camp.  It was the biggest rain I have seen since I have been in Texas.  But it didn’t hurt us and we did not mind the rain.  We are drilling hard all the time, so we will soon be in shape to go to France.  We are all anxious to go, but it seems like they are a long time about sending us across.  We drill with the bayonet some every day.  We practice on dummies made out of wood but it sure teaches us a whole lot about it.  Our company is on guard tonight and most of the boys are gone, but I did not have to go on guard this time.  I will send you a picture of myself and two BAYLIS boys in this letter.  Will try and write more next time.

William LEMAY, Co. G, 130th Inf.

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 4, 1945 – WWI - “William LEMAY, son of George and Eliza LEMAY, died at the Veteran’s Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, Oct. 22, 1945, at the age of 56 years.  Bill was born in Kentucky, coming to Kinmundy when just a boy.  He attended school in Kinmundy.  After World War I was declared, he was one of the first to go.  He received 3 medals of bravery, also the purple heart. 

 


 

(V-371) Harvey Lewellen - seaman

 


 

Kenneth Lewis - “The Kinmundy Express” – June 28, 1945 – “Here’s one dated June 17th from Kenneth LEWIS, B2c, who is sailing on the U.S.S. Rigel in the Southwest Pacific.   He says: It has been quite some time since I wrote you to thank you for the paper, so I thought it my duty to write today.  I’m in the Philippine area again.   This place is practically Japless.  (Wish the world was.)  Am sending you a copy of our ships’ paper.  It’s published daily, and I think it will compete with any ship’s paper in the fleet as for news.  You might notice that only advertisement in it is one ad given to the sale of War Bonds.  Oh, yes, the pictures in it are treats for us fellows.  They are well described on the front page.  I would like to know Kenneth WILKINSON’s address.  Suppose some of the boys are getting back from Germany.  It would not surprise me for this to end over here anytime, but of course, it might last for a year or more.  The one thing is certain, it must be a complete job, regardless of how long it will take.  Several of the boys have got leaves in the last few months and now with the men coming over from Germany soon and the Okinawa Battle in its final stages, it really looks much brighter to us.  Give my regards to all and thanks again for the paper.”

 


 

Leroy Logue

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 13, 1955 – “A 3C and Mrs. Leroy LOGUE and family left Saturday for Manchester, N.H. after spending a 41 day leave with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ellis JOHNSON.  They were accompanied by Mrs. Pauline DEAN and daughter.

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – July 21, 1955 – “AC3 and Mrs. Leroy LOGUE and son, Terry, were

guests of honor at a family picnic in the City Park Sunday.   Leroy is spending a few days here enroute to duty in Japan.  Those present were Mr. and Mrs. Cliff OLDEN and sons of Tolono, Mr. and Mrs. Vernon STOCKER of Savoy, Mr. and Mrs. Eddie HALLER of E. St. Louis, Mr. and Mrs. Ed BRASEL and Mr. and Mrs. Ellis JOHNSON.” 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Jan. 31, 1957 – “A2c Leroy LOGUE, who has been stationed in Japan, arrived home Monday.  He is now visiting with his wife and son in the Ellis JOHNSON home.”

 


 

Joseph Lovett

"The Kinmundy Express" - Nov. 2, 1944 - "Here’s a letter from Joseph LOVETT, S1 c, who is now doing duty on a LST. He says: Well, I suppose you think I have forgotten you and all the people in Kinmundy, but no such luck. That’s a town that will always be favorably remembered in my mind. I have just been too busy every minute to get a chance to write to anyone. Now for the events which have taken place since I last wrote to you. First of all, I was transferred from the Life Saving Station the 26th of June to Berkley Receiving Station in Norfolk, Va. On the first of July, I was again transferred, this time to the Amphibious Training Base, Camp Bradford, just outside Norfolk. I went into rigorous training there for about 2 months (including a 10 day cruise). Then I was sent to Pittsburg where I stayed a few days at the Carnegie Institute of Technology. I picked up my ship and proceeded down the river. I’ll not go into details as that may be military information. I’ll not explain what an LST is for. I think everyone knows that by now. They are playing a large part in all invasions now. I can’t say how I like them either for I’d rather tell the truth and the Navy Dept. might not appreciate my view points. I’m working in the office now doing general yeoman’s worker and hope to be a striker for the same. As time is getting closer to liberty time I better close and get a shave."

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – April 5, 1945 – “Here’s a letter from Joseph LOVETT, S1 c, who is sailing the seven seas on LST.  Haven’t heard from Joe for some time and here is what he says: I suppose that you think I’ve gotten so far from the states by this time that the mail will not reach me.  Well, I’m a long ways away alright, but not that far.  First of all, I want to thank you for sending me your paper.  I have received quite a few up until the past 2 months and I enjoyed them very much.  I enjoyed your Zatso column, for it really took me back to the days when I used to go hunting.  I haven’t received any papers in the past couple of months and just suppose they are held up in the mails.  Mail isn’t any too regular where I am right now but I shouldn’t be complaining.  I am out here where men are men and the women, if they could see them, would be damn proud of them.  These are the times that try men’s hearts and either proves him a man or a boy.  Most that I’ve seen, disregarding age, have been men.  Occasionally you will find a boy among them though; but as a rule not many.  Well, I’ve been away from home, I mean Illinois, for about 6 years now and at last I’m homesick.  I think that everyone who comes out this way experiences it one time or another.  I would give plenty right now to be in the states enjoying myself, but there’s a war being fought and I’m needed as are all the other fellows.  As for liberty outside of the states, well, as far as I am concerned, it doesn’t exist.  I spent some time in and around Hawaii, went to Honolulu and saw all the places of interest; but I didn’t think it was so wonderful.  I haven’t been on liberty since December and haven’t seen a woman in that length of time; in fact, I haven’t seen anyone except the faces around me, quite lonesome, I’ll admit, but really I haven’t missed liberty too much for I’ve been rather busy.  Well, I suppose, I’d better bring this rambling letter to a close and get some work done.  It’s piled up just now and is just yelling for attention.  Thanks again for the paper”

 

 “The Kinmundy Express” – Oct. 18, 1945 – “Here’s a nice letter from Joseph LOVETT, S1c, who is sailing around on the USS LST 764.  He says.  Due to the mail situation, I haven’t been receiving your paper regularly but very soon now we should be in a position to receive all of our mail which is long overdue.  At the present time we are in the port of Jensen in Korea, unloading troops and cargo.  I shall be very happy to see this operation over because it rains out here almost continuously.  According to the scuttlebutt going around we will leave here tomorrow afternoon for Leyte where we will pick up another load of troops and take then in Shanghai.   Since leaving the states on the 28th of June, we have been to Guam, Pearl Harbor, Eaiwetock, Uluthi, Leyte, Hoilo PANEY, and finally we wound up here at this God forsaken place.  We are expecting to return to the states sometime within the near future to have this water wagon decommissioned.  After this job is completed I expect to get a leave and Kinmundy will be my destination.  Cooking is somewhat of a job these days because we are living almost entirely out of cans and dehydrated food is a very popular item with everybody except the fellows that have to eat it.  During our brief visit here, I have had the opportunity to pick up some foreign money which I will show you upon my return to the old home town.  I find trading is the Philippines to be a very profitable; in fact, a carton of cigarettes will bring as much as five dollars and clothing is even higher.  Inflation is terrible.  We have a number of high point men on here that have been eligible for discharge for sometime and today they haven’t done anything for these fellows.  Apparently the Navy can find more excuses to keep a man then the law allows.  Some of these fellows are a military necessity, but yet others are not and about all they are doing is riding.  I suppose the Government will let them got at their convenience.  Once we hit the states again, I don’t expect to be out before my time is up, which will be July 8, 1946.”

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – Dec. 20, 1945 – “We received a short note from Joseph LOVETT, a former resident of this community, telling us that he was now a civilian first class.  Joe enlisted in the Coast Guard in July 1942 and received his discharge Dec. 8.  He saw duty along the east coast for quite some time and then went to the southwest Pacific.  Joe wears the American Theater Ribbon, the Good Conduct Medal, the Victory Ribbon with 1 star, denoting that he was overseas when the war ended, the Asiatic Pacific Ribbon with 1 star and the Philippine Liberation Ribbon with 1 star.  Joe is now at home in Keller, Va., where he is going to open a grocery store.”

 


 

(FL-10) Cecil Lowe with his wife Agnes (Morgan) Lowe

"The Kinmundy Express" - Dec. 7, 1944 

"Here’s an interesting letter from Capt. Cecil LOWE, who is a chaplain stationed in England. He says: We would take this opportunity of expressing our appreciation for the local information and news received through the columns of your paper. Second class mail is rather irregular in reaching us, but we have the pleasure of looking forward to it’s arrival. This is the first opportunity we have taken to write you from England. A very pleasant and uneventful journey was enjoyed in crossing the Atlantic, and it was with thankful hearts that we welcomed land. The English people have been found very congenial. Although, many of the Americans have their grievances, most of them are not serious. The British women are certainly doing their share in the war effort as most of the transportation, and much of the factory work is done by women. The Chaplain has many opportunities to speak to the factory workers and the different social and religious groups. I consider this to be a very profitable means of developing congenial international relationship and harmony. I have spoken from Anglican pulpits, which is not usually accorded the Free Churchman, and might be considered a special privilege. Our Hospital carries on some what of a specialized, and experimental program which seems to be serving its purpose quite well. There are other Patient Chaplains on the Post most of the time, but I am the only assigned chaplain. These Chaplains are usually able to assist with the services. The Sunday Morning Service is well attended. Communion Service is held the last Sunday in each month. Only recently I returned from a short leave which took me to London and Oxford. It was indeed a pleasure to visit the historic and renowned places in these cities. We saw the impressive ceremony of "The Changing Guard" before Buckingham Palace, and sat in the "Whispering Gallery" of St. Paul’s Cathedral. The ancient architecture of "The Tower of London" located at the corner of Tower Bridge takes one back to the eleventh century and in thought to the deeds and crimes of the early English Monarchs. Other places of interest were "Madame Tussand’s Exhibition of Wax Figures", National Arts Museum, British Museum with it’s magnificent Library, Oxford and Paccadilly Circus, Trafalgar Square. Beautiful Westminister Abbey boasts the honor of being the place of crowning and final resting place of many of the rulers of England. Of great interest to a Methodist Chaplain are the home, church and burial place of John WESLEY, the founder of Methodism. It offered me a thrill to be able to stand in the enclosed and uplifted pulpit of this 18th century church of his building. Observations on the damage from the "blitz’ and "flying bombs" remains for future consideration. In many ways Oxford gives a person the feeling of having come to a very old city, as the first colleges of the University were founded several centuries ago. Each of the 27 colleges has its own chapel, hall, quadrangle, library and dormitory. Five of these colleges, built more recently, are for women. The women students have only1 room each. Meals are eaten in the common hall where lectures are also given. For me, the atmosphere of these halls was not to congenial for meditation and absorption of wisdom as there was the invariable odor of fish everywhere, although everything seemed spotless and shining. Each college is enclosed, and the great gates are closed at night and securely locked. To the student desiring a secluded life - "This is It." All students wear sleeveless, short, black gowns, but the Scholar who is unusually brilliant or privileged, has a like gown with full, long sleeves. The university enrollment is restrictive and is much less than an American university. As the students race down the narrow streets on their bicycles with black gowns streaming out behind, they remind one (as our lady, faculty guide suggested) of a horde of black witches. I attended 4 church services on Sunday (rather starved for preaching I guess?) while at Oxford. Two of these were in the larger of the college cathedrals. Two were at the Memorial Methodist Church. These are a few of the many places of interest encountered during our present brief stay in England. We have little reason to complain, as we minister to the needs of others who have been less fortunate than ourselves. Still, the old USA would look good to almost 100% of the American soldiers that I have met. Two officers of Roy DOOLEN’s Group have been under my jurisdiction recently. We thus receive information from the active Theatre of Operations. We had considerable nice weather during August and September, but it is becoming worse now as winter draws near. We can expect bad weather ahead. Best regards and good wishes to all for the Holiday Season."

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Kinmundy Express” – May 2, 1946 –“David LOWE, Coxswain, son of Mr. and Mrs. E.R. LOWE arrived home last Thursday evening and is now enjoying a 30 day leave with his parents.  David entered the Navy in July 1944 and received his boot training at Great Lakes.  From there, he was sent to the west coast.  He shipped overseas, landing at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 1, 1944.  Two weeks later, he was assigned to the USS LSM 77.  He spent Christmas Day at Pearl Harbor.  From there he went to the Russell Islands, Guadalcanal, New Heberdees, and entered Okinaw on D day plus 6.  Here he remained for 6 months.  From there he went to China, Korea, Guam, and spent Christmas Day 1945 back in Pearl Harbor.  He left Pearl Harbor in January and headed for the states landing in San Diego.  From there, he sailed through the Panama Canal to Galveston, Texas, where his ship was decommissioned.  After the expiration of his leave, he will report to Great Lakes, where he will receive his discharge.  And then back home again to his loved ones.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(V-378) David Lowe

 


 

Edward Lowe

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – May 2, 1918;

 

France, March 29, 1918;

Mrs. J.F. DONOVAN, Ladies of the Red Cross, Women’s Club and Fellow Citizens of Kinmundy, Ill.,

Dear Friends – I wish to thanks you and all for remember me in so many ways.  I received candy at Christmas time from the Womans Club, a dandy warm sweater just before I left the states and many good friendly words at different times.  Everybody seems extra good to me and to all the U.S. soldiers.  All but the Heathen Huns and we’ll either pound some sense into them or pound the life out of them before we are thru.

            All the boys are extra strong for the Red Cross and the Y.M.C.A.  You cannot realize how much good they have done for the boys.  One can see Red Cross flags on sox, gloves, sweaters, helmets, comforts and any other thing that would give comfort to a boy.  Comforts for mind, soul and body and the big red “Y” triangle is always seen the first thing in every camp.   The first thing we saw when we docked at England was a long counter where we could get hot coffee and buns and may be you think we did not go for lunch stand.  The big “Y” triangle and circle over a money exchange and coffee for an English penny and a fat graham bun for one penny.  American or U.S. money.  A feed for 4 c.  If we could get at the German’s food supply, we could eat enough to starve them out in a week’s time.  Sea breeze and English rations on the boat made the boy eat like hounds.  We passed thru a part of England and all the boys say it is the most beautiful country they ever saw.  We got to a camp in the middle of the night but it was not too dark to see a circle and triangle - oh there’s a big “Y”,  the boys all know Uncle Sam is looking after his boys.  When we got to France and marched to a camp we sighted a “Y” about the first thing.  We passed thru some pretty country and some where the poor peasants live.  The trains in England and France are the small compartments with side door entrance, only room for 8 men, and the engines look like toys but make fairly good time.  When we arrived at the camp, the Y was right here with a hearty welcome for all.  Last night they had a fine entertainment, violin and piano music, singing, a good talk, and a good sketch artist.  Something every night and services on Sunday and always plenty of writing paper, etc.  and soldiers mail does not even need a stamp. If anyone ever says anything against the Red Cross, Y.M.C.A., or Uncle Sam, have him see a doctor and pity him as a poor grouch.

            The trip across the water was O.K., the boat was large enough and the sea calm enough so only the real land lubbers got sea sick.  I did not even get dizzy, but I had crossed one ocean before.  Did not see a sign of a submarine so outside of a few boat drills did not have very much excitement.  One time when it was real dark I was on deck and saw a big black wave with a crest of foam and my imagination worked enough so I thot it was a sub just going down cutting the water with the periscope.  I got an idea that it would not be an impossible just to scare Edward R.  I was like some fellow said, “For a few seconds my heart got down behind my liver, then jumped up so I had to clear my throat and take a deep breath.”

            One time when we were just leaving England and it got too foggy to travel, the anchor was lowered and the chain made such a noise that almost one hundred men grabbed their life belts and started for the upper deck, thinking that a torpedo was coming straight thru.  It was a funny sight.

            The time we spent coming from England on a cattle boat with the rest of the army mules was not altogether pleasant, but I seem to thrive on canned corn beef and my teeth are  good so I got the hard tack where it did me the most good  and got a winks of sleep in my stall the same the way the mules got theirs so I am like a good mules do not kick.  Some of the boys who were grumbling accuse me of being happy but I see not need of keeping quiet when there is no order against laughing  and Mr. and Mrs. W.W. never had any trouble over a few laughs and smiles, so I am not worrying.

            I saw some grave stones in England date 176 – 198 – 207 and etc. which seemed like a long time ago to me.  Saw an old stone crucifix  built in the side of a wall said to be made by one of the apostles and part of a church build in 900. 

            Have been in two French towns and everything seems old fashioned and I do not understand anything they say, so cannot do much but look.  Five centimes make once cent so one can have a lot of money and then have little.  I got an English pound changed into French money so got lots of Francs and centimes but still have little real money.

            We have all kinds of airplanes here so get to see all kinds of flying, but there is only one place that I would really like to fly and that is Kinmundy, Ill.  If I could fly in some evening I could tell all the people where I had been and the name of ‘owns and etc.’ and Illinois in peace is better than England, France and all the travels.

            Thank all the good people in Kinmundy and tell them I do not kick on what I get in the army, and will not kick any if peace is declared.  Here’s hoping.

              Your friend,    Edward R. LOWE  - 147 Aero Squadron; A.E.F. France, via N.Y.

 

                                               

“Marion County Express”, Kinmundy, Ill. – May 23, 1918;

 France; April 8, 1918;

 Dear Folks,

I have been so busy working and having a good time that I do not believe I have written a letter this month.  Can hardly realize that the U.S. have been in the war a year already and it is getting to be such a business that it does not really seem like war to me.  If I was as close-up to the enemy as some of our friends, I guess I’d think very different and have less time for sight-seeing.  If a shell came over with my name on it, I would not be able to even tell what a sight it was.  Our officers advised us to see all we could and write as often as we liked but say as little as possible so if I give you a guess work letter or you get one with a few lines marked out, just remember Safety First.    I’ll tell you all the names of places and full particulars just as soon as I get home which will be just as soon as I can.  I will not stop for any hesitation waltz or any monkey business when I get the peace note song finished, I’ll join in good and strong on “It’s home boys, home, it’s home you ought to be.”

            Easter Sunday, I heard the best Easter sermon or talk the Y that I ever heard.  It was a true talk, wish you all could have heard it.  I was kept quite busy of days all thru the week, but went to the Y nearly every night and enjoyed myself.  Had pictures, talks, and a fine musical concert.  Am getting some good experience on different kinds of airplane motors.  Some of them are quite different from any I ever saw in the states.  I go to work at regular time, quit at a given time and eat as often as I get a chance and chances are pretty good only there seems to be many others who feel the same symptoms at the same time, so I often have to stand in line for 30 minutes or more before eating and half that long before I can wash my mess outfit.  I feel like I had been asleep about 20 minutes only when first call goes every morning.  You know how it is, spring fever is not so bad but it is very common and seems almost bad sometimes.

 &nb