Kinmundy Area Parks and Lakes

                                                        Kinmundy, Marion Co., Illinois

                                                                 

                                  (Remember that you can also use CTRL-F to find a particular name within these pictures when you are on the page.) 

          


       

   We are looking for photos of people and/or places from around Kinmundy & Alma.  Can you help?

Or maybe you have stories or memories from the "Good Old Days"?  What do YOU remember?

        The Kinmundy Historical Society would be honored to preserve your memories and stories.  We also have the

equipment to scan (or copy) your photos so that they may be enjoyed now as well as for generations yet to come!

        We would love to hear from you!  For more information, please contact: 

       

   Dolores (Ford) Mobley – Dolores@ford-mobley.com

                       208 Joan Dr.; Divernon, IL  62530; (217) 625-7527

            or

           

            Gladys (Corrie) See – gsee49@yahoo.com

                                         408 S. Washington St.; Kinmundy, IL 62854; (618) 547-7731

 


 

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                                    Kinmundy City Park

 

Kinmundy Park

(PL-5) Kinmundy City Park (possibly Shelton's Grove purchased in late 1800's)

 

 

Kinmundy Park

(PL-4) Kinmundy City Park in the snow

 


 

                                       "Walnut Tree from George Washington’s home at Mt. Vernon

                                            “In the little city park of Kinmundy, [IL] on Route 37”

 

Excerpt from “My Hundred Years in Illinois 1876-1976,” - An Autobiography by Fred Otis Grissom, p. 63           

    During the presidential term of Harry Truman, after his 1948 election, Lillian and I visited in Hammond, Louisiana, with Mr. and Mrs. Ed Richardson.  Mrs. Richardson was Lillian’s sister.  Across the street from the Richardson home lived Congressman James Morrison.  During this period the White House was being renovated.  The Louisiana congressman sent the Hammond Women’s Club twenty-five of the old bricks from the White House.  Mrs. Richardson was the club president and had possession of the bricks.  I asked her to give me one, but she refused, saying that they did not belong to her.  I told her I was going to appropriate one for my use, and I did so.  In the little city park of Kinmundy, on Route 37, is a walnut tree that was sent to me by Congressman William Arnold, from George Washington’s home at Mt. Vernon.  This tree I planted, assisted by E. E. (Peck) Brown.  In front of this tree is a concrete block, and on this block is the brick which I took from the Hammond Woman’s Club without their knowledge!  With the assistance and the donation of a heavy chain anchored on iron posts, by Emmit Gray, the brick and the tree make a historical spot in the little park.

        Photos (taken in 2000) and information compiled (August 2007) by Connie Luker

 

(Note: The tree died prior to the Fall of 2013, and was cut down by the City of Kinmundy.)

 

(PL-68)  "Walnut Tree from George Washington’s home at Mt. Vernon” - Kinmundy City Park along Rt. 37

 

 

(PL-69)  "Walnut Tree from George Washington’s home at Mt. Vernon” - Kinmundy City Park along Rt. 37

 


 

                   Gunn's Grove (also known as Charlton's Grove)

 

Gunns Grove - Kinmundy

(PL-7) Gunn's Grove (also known as Charlton Grove).

In Aug. 1985, Sammy Lowe owns this land.  (West on 4th St. until you run into McCarty Rd. (just outside city limits).  6063 McCarty Rd.

 

 


 

(PL-70) "Greetings from Kinmundy, Illinois" Lake postcard

 

 


 

                                Old Mill Pond near Songer's Mill

 

Old Mill Pond - Kinmundy

(PL-1) Old Mill Pond near Songer's Mill

 

Old Mill Pond - Kinmundy

(PL-2) The Old Mill Pond near Songer's Mill

 


 

                                    Kinmundy Lake & Reservoir

 

Kinmundy Lake

(PL-13) Kinmundy Lake

 

Kinmundy Lake

(PL-14) Kinmundy Lake

 

 

Kinmundy Lake

(PL-16) Illinois Central Lake

 

 

Kinmundy Lake

(PL-11) C. & E.I. Reservoir

Northern pump station on left & C. & E. I. RR Water Tower in distance – taken 1902.

It was located between Log Cabin Village & Evergreen Cemetery. Picture is taken looking east.  [Used prior to building lake.]

 

Kinmundy Lake

(PL-12) Illinois Central Railroad Reservoir

 

 

Kinmundy Lake

(PL-19) Kinmundy Illinois Central Railroad Reservoir located south of Kinmundy on Rt. 37

 

 

Kinmundy Lake

(PL-20) East Side Lagoon

(Post mark on back of postcard was Nov. 24, 1910).  Located north of E. Cross St. across I.C. RR track.

This photo and PL-10 photo below are the same place, just different directions.

 

(PL-69) I.C. Lagoon looking south.  West side of I.C. RR – 1902.  West of Kinmundy-Alma High School (in 2011, the middle school).

 

Kinmundy Lake

(PL-10) I.C. Lagoon looking south.  West side of I.C. RR – 1902.  West of Kinmundy-Alma High School (in 2011, the middle school).

 

Kinmundy Lake

(PL-22) The Old Kinmundy Lake (beside Rt. 37)

 

 


 

                           Saylor Springs

 

 

 

(PL-48) John Smith, Carl Purcell, Chas Smith, John Purcell, Gillum Wilson at Saylor Springs for a family reunion

 


 

                                    Kinmundy Zoological Garden

 

 

Kinmundy Zoological Garden

(PL-30) Kinmundy Zoological Garden (photo taken Oct. 1909)

 

 

 

 

Kinmundy Zoological Zoo

(PL-31) Kinmundy Zoological Garden

 


 

                                    Snyder Springs

 

Snyder's Springs - Kinmundy

(PL-40) Snyder Springs (located in Kinmundy Township, Sec 12, north of Route 37) ["Schneider Springs"]

On page 30 of the Kinmundy Centennial book:  “Snyder Springs was the favorite place for Sunday School picnics for many years. 

The trip was made on a hay wagon or in your buggy or surrey.  A trolley ride which stretched from the grove down to the springs

below was the favorite amusement.  A pulley wheel, with a cross bar to hold on to traveled on the wire,

you hung on and whizzed through space to the bottom of the hill.”

 

 

Snyder's Springs - Kinmundy

(PL-41) Snyder Springs

 

 

Snyder's Springs - Kinmundy

(PL-42) Snyder Springs

 

 

                        FS-1 Herman Schneider, Sr and Lena (Knauer) Schneider                                                                                                            FS-2 Schneider Home

 

Christian Schneider was born March 29, 1815 in Gradshaw, West Germany.  He died December 1, 1876, and is buried in the St. Peter Lutheran Cemetery.  In 1839, he married in Prussia to Rosalie Beata Walcholz.  She was born March 17, 1821 in West Germany and died March 1909.  She is buried in Farina Cemetery.   Their children were Herman, Julius, Emil, Heneritta, Alwine, and Wilhelm Henry.  Christian Schneider and his family settled in Staunton, Ill., where Wilhelm was born.  Wilhelm was 9 years old when his parents moved to the St. Peter area.  Their first night in Fayette county was spent in a two story brick house on Rt. 40, east of Bluff City.  Christian owned land in Macoupin and Fayette County.  Christian and Rosalie’s first son, Herman Julius Frederick Schneider, was born Sept. 9, 1855 in Pantau Co., West Prussia, Saaben, Germany.  In 1862, he came to America with his parents.  He was confirmed Apr. 10, 1870 in the Evangelical Church. 

Herman Schneider and his family later moved to Fayette Co. in 1876.  In Oct. 10, 1878, he married Lena Knauer in Lone Grove twp.  They lived where Glenn and Mae Sigrist once lived, which was just across the Fayette Co. line  Herman Jr. was born here and they later moved to the large home north of Kinmudy where they finished building the inside of the house.  This is the location of the famous SCHNEIDER SPRINGS that Herman and Lena developed where people came from churches and around for their Sunday picnic.

                Herman and Lena had 5 children to die from T.B. within a five year period. Herman died from apoloxy at the age of 74.  Funeral services were held at the Evangelical Church in Farina, Illinois.  Their children: Herman Wilhelm Emil Schneider, Matilda Alwine Emma, William Henry, Ida Emilie, Bertha Rosa, Minnie E., Adolph J., Lena Louise Maria, Emma Rosalia Caroline and Freida.  On Dec. 5, 1878, Herman bought land from William and Harriet Neeper from Maxon Co., Kentucky for the sum of $560.  On Feb. 15, 1879, they bought 160 acres from William and Harriet Neeper from Kentucky, for the same amount of $560.  Herman purchased 85 acres for $2000 on Jan. 27, 1883 from Thomas and Mary Meagher from Centralia, Illinois.  Herman lived at a Kinmundy address at this time.  They were from Fayette county when they made the first two purchases.

                By the early 1930’s, the springs area was no longer used for picnics.  This particular piece of land later belonged to Herman Jr. and Lillie Mae Barbee Schneider.  However, they did not live at the same location as the parents.  Herman and Lillie lived along R. 37 all their married lives.

                Herman and Lillie’s son Merle owned and raised cattle on this homestead until his death on Oct. 31, 1992.

Herman and Lillie’s children: Clarence Herman,  Naomi Tillie Lena;   Hilda Emma Marie;   Edna Mae Alvina;   Merle Willis;  Ervin Henry;  Dorothy Alice Frieda; Betty Jean Ella Mae;  Arlene Lillie Rose

(Information and family photos provided by Rena (Crain) O'Dell)

 


 

                                    Stephen A. Forbes State Park

 

Forbes State Park - Kinmundy

(PL-50) Stephen A. Forbes State Park located near Omega, Illinois - early arial photo

 

Forbes State Park - Kinmundy

(PL-51) Stephen A. Forbes State Park located near Omega, Illinois - later arial photo

 

Forbes State Park - Kinmundy

(PL-52) Stephen A. Forbes State Park boat dock - ca 1960's

 

 

Forbes State Park - Kinmundy

PL-52) Stephen A. Forbes State Park boat launch - ca 1960's

 

Forbes State Park - Kinmundy

(PL-53) Stephen A. Forbes State Park boat dock - ca 1960's

 

 

 

Fred Miselbrook - Forbes State Park - Kinmundy

(PL-54) "3,019 acre Forbes State Park and it's mushrooms coming alive"

Park Ranger Fred Miselbrook, at left, stands near a plot of ground devoted to native prairie grasses at Stephen A. Forbes State Park.  Many state parks

have such plots which require periodic burning as part of their maintenance.  The native prairie grasses are burned off every two to four years in order to

duplicate the fires on the original prairie which were started by lightening.  Fires on the original prairie prevented any trees and such from establishing themselves

through the vast prairies that once existed over the flatlands of central Illinois where today the farm's plow has exposed the black earth.  Miselbrook said studies

have shown that the prairie grasses are quite fragile and cannot sustain themselves if cultivated or even grazed upon with any intensity.  The map pictured at the

right is located outside the park ranger's office.  It locates some of the many public offerings the park has awaiting visitors.  Camping, fishing, boating, mushroom

hunting, and many other activities are available to park visitors.  The park is located just 14 miles northeast of Salem and is named in honor of a gifted Illinois

scientist who lived in the late 1800's and early 1900's.

 

Forbes State Park - Kinmundy - Leslie Eblin and Dwight Ingram

(PL-56) Dwight Ingram and Leslie Eblin

 

 

Forbes State Park - Kinmundy

(PL-57) Stephen A. Forbes State Park entry sign

 

Forbes State Park - Kinmundy

(PL-58) Constructing the beach at Forbes State Park

 

Forbes State Park - Kinmundy

(PL-59) Constructing the beach at Forbes State Park

 

Forbes State Park - Kinmundy

(PL-60) Forbes State Park beach - and looking toward the dam

 

Forbes State Park - Kinmundy

(PL -61) Fishermen at Forbes State Park

 

 

Forbes State Park - Kinmundy - the Leaky Bucket

(PL-62) Forbes State Park restaurant 'The Leaky Bucket" - 2014

 


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